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Old 06-01-2011, 08:57 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Clutch adjustment

I am just wondering if there should be any slop in between the slave cylinders pushrod and the clutch lever or should it be hard up against it?
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Old 06-01-2011, 11:14 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Yes. There is always a gap between a pedal and whatever it pushes or pulls.
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Old 06-02-2011, 12:26 AM   #3 (permalink)
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That's not how a hydraulic system works. There is no true freeplay in a hydraulic clutch. Due to the nature of the system, a newer disc will create the 'feel' of freeplay, but that is due to the mechanics of the pressure plate and its relation to the friction material. No adjustments can be performed to change this like you could on a mechanical linkage.

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Old 06-02-2011, 12:37 AM   #4 (permalink)
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That is how the brake system works AND the clutch pedal works on every car. There is a bit of freeplay between the pedal and the actuating rod, it is a very tiny amount but it is there. There is always a little freeplay to allow for the expansion of the fluid due to temp changes.

The better question is where exactly is this freeplay?
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Old 06-02-2011, 01:14 AM   #5 (permalink)
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You are correct, brakes do have freeplay. With disc brakes, the rotor will aid the specially designed seals in the calipers in the retraction of the friction material. Drums, however, are retracted solely by springs. The clutch system is spring controlled, and does not have any constant spinning action between fixed and moving parts. In normal use, the clutch disc is held tight, with no movement between it and its adjacent components. The spring action of the pressure plate ensures both maximum holding power of the clutch disc and the return action of the throw out bearing. When clutch disengagement is desired, maximum stroke is needed from the release mechanism. This can be adjusted in a mechanical setup, although most cars with a cable are not serviceable in this way. The hydraulic system maintains zero lash and is referred to as self adjusting because it requires no adjustment. The pushrod in the slave cylinder maintains contact with the release fork at all times. After the operator has released the clutch pedal, there is nothing to return the pushrod except for the tension from the pressure plate. A properly operating slave cylinder, when removed from service, will 'pop' away from its mounting because of this slight, but constant, pressure.

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Old 06-02-2011, 01:56 AM   #6 (permalink)
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There is a return spring for the pedal i do beleive. i dont have access to my manuals now
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Old 06-02-2011, 03:23 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Yes the pedal has a return spring. It also has adjustablility on the master cylinders pushrod on the pedal.
My clutch is worn and I have a replacement on it's way. But for now my clutch is slipping. Because there is no free play between the lever and the slave cylinder I am assuming that the throw out bearing is in contact all the time due to the thinning of the friction disc.
In all of my other cars which used cable operated clutches there was free play as the lever had to pull the throw out bearing away from the pressure plate (achieved via a return spring) so you could push the lever and compress the spring by hand. But because there isn't a return spring and all I can figure is the pressure plate is returning the lever to original position it is too hard to compress the pressure plate finger springs.
Ok I think I made that all sound too complicated than what it all actually is. But, I think my clutch isn't clearing all the way due to being worn. And to get another 2 or 3 weeks out of it I was hoping I may be able to adjust it to clear again?
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Old 06-04-2011, 01:24 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Yes, the pedal has a return spring, and yes the pedal is adjustable. The only change you will achieve, however, is a new pedal position. You cannot change the relation of the throwout to the pressure plate at the pedal. This is the unfortunate way of the hydraulic; as they wear, the freeplay that we feel goes away. The fingers on the pressure plate are mostly released onto the worn clutch disc, so it takes much less movement of the pedal to release the disc from the plate and the flywheel. This is a heads up to disc replacement time. It does not, however, mean you must do it now. If you drive conservatively, locally, and flatly, you may find you can extend the time into several thousand miles. Is it slipping? Mine slipped in third for literally 20k miles, but I waited until it was slipping in 5th to replace it. I did not, however, live in the mountains at that time. People may complain about low power from a subaru 4 cylinder engine, but this is one of their many advantages, they do not tear things up so readily!!

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Old 06-04-2011, 07:13 AM   #9 (permalink)
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It slips in every gear.. I noticed it not gripping as well when I went offroad in the sand the other month but just the other day it slipped while trying to over take in 5th gear going 80kph up to 100kph. When I put my foot down the revs went from 2200 to 3500 without any speed increase. Happened very quickly and as soon as I notices (engine is so quiet) I backed off. Since then I've been driving very carefully. Personally I find the 2.5L to have plenty of guts. I've driving many cars including V8's and turbo 2.2L fords. It goes very well for a 1450kg car with only a 2.5 litre.
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Old 06-04-2011, 11:55 PM   #10 (permalink)
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I agree, the car is pretty peppy. The most powerful I have owned! My point was that for the power it has, the clutch is harder to accidentally abuse unless you completely do not know how to drive a standard shift vehicle.

Sounds like it is time for you to replace your clutch. I am happy with the setup I installed, but I do not know what will be available for you. I am assuming you are not in the USA. I have some non-stock parts.

James
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