Caliper Rebuild - Subaru Outback - Subaru Outback Forums

SubaruOutback.org is the premier Subaru Outback Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
Old 06-03-2012, 07:29 AM   #1 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Boston
Car: 2007 Outback Ltd
Posts: 8
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default Caliper Rebuild

Does anyone have advice on replacing caliper piston dust boots? I checked YouTube but didn't see much.
duco820 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-03-2012, 12:57 PM   #2 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: WV
Car: OBW H6 VDC, H6 OB Sed, XT6's
Posts: 5,161
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Default

they're easy. just disassemble and reassemble, you'll figure it out in a matter of minutes.

pop the pistons out first. you can remove the caliper from the caliper bracket and leave the hydraulic brake hose intact - then keep pressing the brake fluid to force the piston out. have a bucket underneath to catch the fluid and piston.

you can also try compressed air in the brake line fitting if it's already remove to push the piston out.

then simply remove and replace whatever seals/dust boots/clamps there are.

I've seen a few different arrangements in Subaru's - some have a clip retaining the dust boot and some don't.

either way it's really easy. groove around piston - remove seal and install new one.

takes a minute looking at how the dust boots install but put the caliper side boot down in the groove in the piston bore and the top of it on the piston. this new probably uses a retainig clip inside the bore.

takes a minute to decide how to install it...like do i push the piston in first, then install the bottom boot...or...etc.

and while i've done a few i can't even recall what the order is, but it's very simple to figure out.
__________________
H6 VDC OBW, H6 OB Sedan, XT6's, castrated LSi - FWD EJ18
grossgary is online now   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-03-2012, 09:02 PM   #3 (permalink)
Super Moderator
 
rockhopjohn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: ID, MT, ND, I'm a transient
Car: 2004 Outback Wagon, Mystic Blue Pearl
Posts: 4,907
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default

Nice, thanks for the quick how-to. When I did my front brakes a few months ago I noticed the dust boot on my the passenger side front caliper had a tear in it. Will have to give this a shot sooner or later, and will try to take pictures and do a right up when I do, if someone else doesn't do on first.
__________________
I'm not retarded, I just don't proofread my posts
rockhopjohn is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-07-2012, 08:08 PM   #4 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Bend, OR
Car: 2012 Outback 2.5 CVT Premium
Posts: 49
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default

Just one more thing to consider (if you hadn't already) is that you should really do both calipers and not just one. You'll probably end up with a brake imbalance if you don't do both. I've done lots of caliper rebuilds before and Gary's write up is a great guide. I actually took pics of a caliper rebuild on my old FJ62 Landcruiser. I was going to post it on the IH8MUD forum but my hard drive decided to crap itself and i lost the pics

Good luck with your rebuild and let us know how you get on.

Joe
JoeJukka is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-08-2012, 11:41 AM   #5 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: WV
Car: OBW H6 VDC, H6 OB Sed, XT6's
Posts: 5,161
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Default

for those of you with torn dust boots (actually I think one of mine is torn too on one of my daily drivers). we might even simply entertain the idea of just replacing the dust boot, that's simple. remove boot and replace it. that would avoid removing the piston, seal, fluid, bleeding the brakes, etc. i've never thought of that before but if attended to promptly and if you don't have any or prevent any rust in the bore from the dust boot being cracked - there's no reason to disasemble it.

mine may be too rusty at this point, i'll have to see.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeJukka View Post
You'll probably end up with a brake imbalance if you don't do both.
actually i've never seen brake imbalance, there's no physical reason for it on Subaru's (other makes may vary - i know "everything" about Subaru's and "nothing" about anything else).

if a brake caliper is properly working there's no reason for an "imbalance", it's practically impossible to have that actually.

brake calipers are really simple - a piston sliding in a bore - it is either sliding properly in the bore or it's not. there's really no reason for imbalance.

and outside of simply saying that - i've done it a ton of times and have dozens of other experiences to verify this.

most imbalance of brake calipers on the roads right now is due to the brake caliper sliding pins. they are filled with grease and degrade at WILDLY different rates in terms of loosing grease or being compromised due to dirt, dust, temps, and rust. you can easily find cars with one seized rusty pin and the others on the entire vehicle are operating perfectly. that's common.
__________________
H6 VDC OBW, H6 OB Sedan, XT6's, castrated LSi - FWD EJ18
grossgary is online now   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-08-2012, 12:09 PM   #6 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 55
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default

Hi guys, I just bought an 05 Legacy Wagon and would like to change the brakes myself, can you guys point me to materials that will help.

Thanks
goguy is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-08-2012, 12:34 PM   #7 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: WV
Car: OBW H6 VDC, H6 OB Sed, XT6's
Posts: 5,161
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by goguy View Post
Hi guys, I just bought an 05 Legacy Wagon and would like to change the brakes myself, can you guys point me to materials that will help.

Thanks
Subaru brakes are really easy, there's not much to it. once the wheel is off you can literally change brake pads by removing TWO bolts, on some older Subaru's it was only ONE. ONE...or TWO bolts. Real easy. Has to be write ups out there for something this simple...NASIOC no doubt has one, here probably does.

1. remove wheel
2. remove brake caliper slide pin bolts
3. compress piston with c-clamp (after removing cap on brake master cylinder)
4. clean and regrease the slide pins with brake caliper grease
5. clean the brake pad clips with a wire brush if yo'ure not going to replace them. just pry them out, they pop right out with a little screwdriver persuasion
6. remove and install pads
7. reassemble

if you're replacing rotors you remove the two 17mm (or 19) brake caliper bracket bolts to remove the bracket. the rotor then comes off. if it's hard to get off - pound it off or use a M8x1.25 (i think that's the size) bolt to thread into the two holes in the rotor - keep screwing the bolt until it "pushes" the rotor off the hub. you often need 2 bolts for each rotor - one for each hole and the threads get mangled due to the forces involved and the bolts are not reusable.

new clips are nice to get and some pads (very few and they're going to be more expensive) will have new clips in them. i bought some Adaptive One pads from NAPA that had new clips with them.

the clips get dusty/corrosion build up and eventually over time that can prevent a pad from sliding properly in and out. doesn't happen often but nice to avoid too.

brake jobs are really easy - the hard part is stuck rotors and seized guide pins, tricky things like that. but just changing pads is super simple.
__________________
H6 VDC OBW, H6 OB Sedan, XT6's, castrated LSi - FWD EJ18
grossgary is online now   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-08-2012, 01:33 PM   #8 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Bend, OR
Car: 2012 Outback 2.5 CVT Premium
Posts: 49
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by grossgary View Post
for those of you with torn dust boots (actually I think one of mine is torn too on one of my daily drivers). we might even simply entertain the idea of just replacing the dust boot, that's simple. remove boot and replace it. that would avoid removing the piston, seal, fluid, bleeding the brakes, etc. i've never thought of that before but if attended to promptly and if you don't have any or prevent any rust in the bore from the dust boot being cracked - there's no reason to disasemble it.

mine may be too rusty at this point, i'll have to see.

actually i've never seen brake imbalance, there's no physical reason for it on Subaru's (other makes may vary - i know "everything" about Subaru's and "nothing" about anything else).

if a brake caliper is properly working there's no reason for an "imbalance", it's practically impossible to have that actually.

brake calipers are really simple - a piston sliding in a bore - it is either sliding properly in the bore or it's not. there's really no reason for imbalance.

and outside of simply saying that - i've done it a ton of times and have dozens of other experiences to verify this.

most imbalance of brake calipers on the roads right now is due to the brake caliper sliding pins. they are filled with grease and degrade at WILDLY different rates in terms of loosing grease or being compromised due to dirt, dust, temps, and rust. you can easily find cars with one seized rusty pin and the others on the entire vehicle are operating perfectly. that's common.
So you've never had a piston sticking in a caliper ever?

I would've thought you'd come across that in at least one of the many caliper rebuilds that you've done.

Sticking pistons are a very common cause of a brake imbalance, as are sticking pins so you also said.

You said that the piston is either sliding in the bore or it's not........well if one is sliding correctly and the other one isn't, then you will have a brake imbalance won't you.

This is more of a 'brake' issue rather than a 'Subaru' issue. So even though you 'everything' about Subarus the real issue is with the mechanics of the brake caliper which operates the same way, whether it's a Subaru Outback or a BMW M3. Subaru's brake components will be made by a big, well know brake manufacturer. The brake calipers on my cousins 2011 WRX STI are made by Brembo not Subaru.

I'm not trying to argue with you but all i'm saying is that i've come across many sticking or seized caliper pistons in my 16 years as a mechanic.

Good luck with the project duco820. Let us know how it goes.
JoeJukka is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-08-2012, 01:46 PM   #9 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Bend, OR
Car: 2012 Outback 2.5 CVT Premium
Posts: 49
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Default

Just to clarify, if you're only going to change the dust boot on one caliper then this won't cause an imbalance, but if you decide to go and strip the caliper down and replace the seals, then you might end up with a brake imbalance because one side will have nice new seals and fluid and the other side will have old less supple seals and older fluid.
JoeJukka is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-08-2012, 03:32 PM   #10 (permalink)
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: WV
Car: OBW H6 VDC, H6 OB Sed, XT6's
Posts: 5,161
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeJukka View Post
So you've never had a piston sticking in a caliper ever?
of course, i live in the rust belt, you can't work on stuff here without seeing this, that's why i think i've got good experience to share very specifically with. lots of rust, lots of piston/caliper/rebuilding/replacement - i've replaced singles, pairs, and more. Folks here see more rusted/corroded stuff in a week than others would see in a lifetime and hate every minute of it! YIELD, presses, torches, high quality left handed drill bits are required here. half the time a seized piston also means a pitted/corroded caliper bore that gets replaced instead of rebuilt. two of my daily drivers (80's eras Subaru XT6's) i had shipped from California and Texas because I wanted zero rust. it's terrible.

agreed - calipers hydraulically are the same, just keeping things focused.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeJukka View Post
I would've thought you'd come across that in at least one of the many caliper rebuilds that you've done.
i have - and every time i've replaced or rebuilt one caliper - i've seen zero issues with "imbalance".

if you believe in imbalance and as a rule always avoid it - then i would have far more experience than you in end results and actual driving performance since i do it all the time, as a rule and i've done it by replacing everything at once as well.
__________________
H6 VDC OBW, H6 OB Sedan, XT6's, castrated LSi - FWD EJ18
grossgary is online now   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Subaru Outback - Subaru Outback Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:31 PM.



Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2
Copyright 2009-2010 SubaruOutback.org. All Rights Reserved.