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Old 01-31-2013, 02:00 PM   #11 (permalink)
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If you're changing wheels for the season, when pulling into the garage or driveway come to a short stop and that also helps break up any tension between the wheel and hub.

And while actually swapping wheels, a wire brush, some paper towels and a small tube of antiseize go a long way. Brush off any existing rust, wipe down the wheel hub and apply a SMALL amount of antiseize and spread it around the hub (like others mentioned above, avoid getting it in the lug holes). Repeat this every time you switch wheels and they'll come off in a pinch.
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Old 01-31-2013, 02:28 PM   #12 (permalink)
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I thinking lubing the wheel studs is a very low concern. The running torque of lugnuts I put on is in the few ft lbs range at most. When you are torque to 76 ft lbs, what's a few extra ft lbs? It's within the measurement accuracry of your torque wrench. You know, the one you use to put that spare on out in the snow by the side of the road when you change a flat?
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Old 01-31-2013, 02:37 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Quote:
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I thinking lubing the wheel studs is a very low concern. The running torque of lugnuts I put on is in the few ft lbs range at most. When you are torque to 76 ft lbs, what's a few extra ft lbs? It's within the measurement accuracry of your torque wrench. You know, the one you use to put that spare on out in the snow by the side of the road when you change a flat?
It is more than a "few". We're talking a possible difference of 50 or more footpounds. Certainly enough to ruin the stud and risk breaking them. You aren't putting as much torque on the lug nut to get it to tighten the same number of threads. So you tighten it further, stretch the stud, and risk breaking it. This is the same reason why you don't use an impact wrench to install wheels.
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Old 01-31-2013, 04:28 PM   #14 (permalink)
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I don't lube my wheel studs, and have never seen anti-seize on them, and I liberally cover the mating surface on mine with anti-seize, and I'm a slob.

By the way, if using cast rims and chasing a balancing-type vibration, check for very strong black corrosion on the wheels mating surface. On mine it caused enough runout to cause a vibe at speed, and I had to chip it off with a hammer and blunt punch, it laughed at my wire wheel, but it shattered like glass.
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Old 02-01-2013, 08:48 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Got empirical evidence? This has been standard practice for decades. Adding lube to a fastener will not double the torque. It reduces the torque required to turn the threaded portion. Most stud applications call for lube, generally an oil. Some fastener manufacturers even sell their own brand of lube for this purpose. What a lube will due is increase the applied torque. Your torque wrench will not waste as much effort in just turning the fastener.

See this link, it has good info.

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It is more than a "few". We're talking a possible difference of 50 or more footpounds. Certainly enough to ruin the stud and risk breaking them. You aren't putting as much torque on the lug nut to get it to tighten the same number of threads. So you tighten it further, stretch the stud, and risk breaking it. This is the same reason why you don't use an impact wrench to install wheels.
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Old 02-01-2013, 09:00 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Your torque wrench measures the amount of pressure you are putting on it to tighten the nut. Because it requires less effort to tighten the lug nut, your torque wrench gives a false reading it will read much lower than it actually is, resulting in you OVER tightening the nut, although you have "torqued it to specs".

Source: Been through ATS training through TIA (Tire Industry Association), certified as a tire tech, also certified Goodyear Tire Expert, and I work in tires every day.
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Old 02-01-2013, 09:16 PM   #17 (permalink)
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I have been a mechanic for a decade. I understand perfectly well how a torque wrench works. Read what I posted up. Torque wrenches, indeed, read the rotational torque applied to the fastener. The torque spec is a clamp load spec.

The less friction used in rotational torque, the more accurate the applied torque. This is why high torque load applications typically use studs, rather than bolts. Instead of turning a long bolt that twists and has a lenghty thread, a much shorter nut can be turned. The bottom end of your GM uses studs for the rods. They may not have an especially high torque applied to them, but they are subjected to dynamic loads, much like a wheel end is.
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Old 02-01-2013, 09:34 PM   #18 (permalink)
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Torque is nothing but a way of guessing at the measure of the clamping force.

The nut tightens with less effort. The less effort required the less measured torque, the more you have to turn the wrench to measure the proper torque. Torque measure is not a perfect measure. That's why there are torque ranges and you should double check and triple check everything.
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Old 02-02-2013, 01:55 AM   #19 (permalink)
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I use the NAPA store brand of silver anti-seize (8 ounce can). The back label specifically states that it does NOT affect bolt torque. I have used it on every conceivable type of fastener for decades with no issues. Including wheel studs (threads only, not the cone seats). I always recheck the lug nut torque after 50 or 100 miles and rarely find that the nuts have moved, even a tiny amount.

I can't comment if this applies to only this product, or to all brands.

Interesting thread here: ... Use of Anti Seize on Vehicle Lug Nuts

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Old 02-02-2013, 12:11 PM   #20 (permalink)
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As I've used a number of aftermarket wheels (winter tire packages from TireRack that often include fitment rings), the possibility of a cold weld (intermetallic formation) between aluminum and iron is a big problem. After it happened to me, I wire brushed the hubs and mating surfaces to a nice polish, and applied anti-seize. I refresh it with every rotation.
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