H6 Head gasket replacement - Page 5 - Subaru Outback - Subaru Outback Forums
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post #41 of 144 (permalink) Old 06-01-2011, 05:40 PM
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3.0 H6 Head gasket replacement photos

I decided to add to the collection of photos related to replacing the head gaskets on the H6. I just got the engine out today, and the teardown starts tomorrow.

Link to Flickr set

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post #42 of 144 (permalink) Old 06-01-2011, 05:43 PM
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H6 service

One fun discovery: the wrench end of my deep 1/4" drive sockets fit perfectly into the holes in the crankshaft pulley, so with a breaker bar I essentially recreated Subaru's special tool for keeping the crank from turning while you remove the pulley.


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post #43 of 144 (permalink) Old 06-02-2011, 09:55 AM
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That gives a good view of why headers on the H6 3.0 (vs 3.0r etc) really don't do much...


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post #44 of 144 (permalink) Old 06-03-2011, 06:41 PM
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H6 innards

Album updated with more pictures. Here are a couple with and without the inner timing chain cover:





Rounded off about ten of the stupid little allen socket cap screws holding the cover in place. Managed to remove six with vise grips, but I had to drill off the heads of four. Not so bad, though, since the socket guided my drill bit right down the center. A 1/4" carbide bit was the perfect size to remove the entire head without the risk of damaging the cover since there's a bit of clearance around the threads.

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post #45 of 144 (permalink) Old 06-03-2011, 06:42 PM
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Socket trick works on the cam sprockets, too:

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post #46 of 144 (permalink) Old 06-10-2011, 05:58 PM
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Finally got the heads on. There are so many surfaces to clean up on this engine.

Shot of the bare block:



Those divots in the pistons had me worried for a bit, but they were filled with carbon deposits, so I think they were made that way. They're only visible because I spent a couple of hours removing all that **** carbon.

Copper-sprayed head gasket in place:



Freshly milled cylinder head:



Fully installed (opposite side):



Unlike the 4, the 6 requires all eight bolts to be tightened to the same torque (25Nm), then all are tightened 90 degrees, then the inner four are tightened another 90 degrees but the outer four are tightened only 45 degrees more. All the marks on the bolt heads started at 12 o'clock.

I had a slight clacking before the head gasket failed, and I'm pretty sure I found the culprit. The clearance on one of my right-side intake valves was 0.014", way outside factory spec (0.008"). Heading to the dealer tomorrow to pick up a new power steering pump ($470, ouch) and order a new shim.
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post #47 of 144 (permalink) Old 06-10-2011, 10:00 PM
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hate to see it, but nice to see folks digging into and posting about H6 work.

any comments on doing timing chain work with the engine in the car?

seems like the hardest part would be installing the sealant covered timing cover without rubbing or messing up the sealing bead?
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post #48 of 144 (permalink) Old 06-10-2011, 11:30 PM
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hate to see it, but nice to see folks digging into and posting about H6 work.

any comments on doing timing chain work with the engine in the car?

seems like the hardest part would be installing the sealant covered timing cover without rubbing or messing up the sealing bead?
I can't imagine doing it. If it were just my timting chain cover leaking, I would just keep adding oil. Even after removing the 57 bolts (eight of which rounded out), it was a pain in the butt to break the seal to remove the cover. Cleaning all the mating surfaces is a nightmare.
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post #49 of 144 (permalink) Old 06-11-2011, 02:26 PM
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I can't imagine doing it. If it were just my timting chain cover leaking,
hmmm. mine is due to a noisy timing chain guide. it's been there for over 50,000 miles so obviously i can live with it. but seems like i should think about doing it this summer.

i'd pull the radiator and condensor and other stuff, i'll probably try it without pulling the motor. last one i pulled a couple weeks ago took like 4 hours, it sucked. i've done tons of subaru headgaskets in the car so i can probably swing it, have extra cars and can pull it if i have too.
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post #50 of 144 (permalink) Old 06-11-2011, 02:37 PM
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hmmm. mine is due to a noisy timing chain guide. it's been there for over 50,000 miles so obviously i can live with it. but seems like i should think about doing it this summer.

i'd pull the radiator and condensor and other stuff, i'll probably try it without pulling the motor. last one i pulled a couple weeks ago took like 4 hours, it sucked. i've done tons of subaru headgaskets in the car so i can probably swing it, have extra cars and can pull it if i have too.
You'll definitely need to remove the radiator. You may have enough clearance without removing the condenser, though, so I'd give it a try before adding the expense of recharging your A/C system. I had a **** of a time breaking the seal loose, though. There are a couple of indentations in the cover where you can slip a pry bar between the outer cover and the block for leverage. Start at the corners and work a sturdy, thin scraper into the silicone and then gently work it around. Careful not to hammer it in, though, because you could hurt the chains. Try to stay as shallow as possible. My alignment pins at the top were corroded, so even after breaking the silicone loose I had to lever it off. Just be careful not to pry against the inner cover, because they're both soft aluminum. I was surprised at how much the outer cover flexed.

If you have timing chain noise, it could be the guide or one of the tensioners. I'd check them all for any breakage of the plastic guides or any problems with the tensioner springs. Also make sure the oil passages behind the tensioners are clear. I found a few chunks of hardened sealant wedge in nooks and crannies and in the oil pickup screen.
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