2001 a bunch of related problems maybe - Page 3 - Subaru Outback - Subaru Outback Forums
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post #21 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-15-2019, 05:36 PM
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Drove the car to Home Depot (5 minutes up the road). When I was almost home the steering starting shaking again. Pulled into the driveway, put the batteries in the new thermometer gun and checked the temps...



Driver's side front was 164 degrees (F).



Passenger side front was 513 degrees!



Looks like I'll be doing some brake work soon.
I'd say that's very hot. Lol. Read my last post about the rubbers before changing calibers though. May save you some money.

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post #22 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-15-2019, 05:41 PM Thread Starter
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Instead of doing this while hot, you could also take all the lower caliber slides out and remove that rubber piece and grease it before putting it back in. Check that the top slides move freely as well. Those almost always do because they dont have the rubber on them.
Are you talking about the rubber boot that the slide pin goes in? Or the little rubber piece at the end of the pin?

I was going to pull it all apart (probably change pads and rotors while I'm in there) and grease up the slide pins. Or replace them if they look bad. If that fixes it, great. If not then I'll change the calipers. I didn't want to do that righ toff the bat cuz I hate bleeding the brakes.

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post #23 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-15-2019, 05:44 PM
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Are you talking about the rubber boot that the slide pin goes in? Or the little rubber piece at the end of the pin?



I was going to pull it all apart (probably change pads and rotors while I'm in there) and grease up the slide pins. Or replace them if they look bad. If that fixes it, great. If not then I'll change the calipers. I didn't want to do that righ toff the bat cuz I hate bleeding the brakes.
I hate bleeding too especially alone. Lol

I'm talking about the rubber at the end of the pin. Will fail drastically at some point. So I remove them and grease it very well.

Clearly your issue is the front. So you can start with just those but I would remove it on the rear too when you get a chance.

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post #24 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-16-2019, 08:46 AM
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Brakes came to mind when you said the light was on and the fluid low. So let me explain that first. When new brake pads are put on and the fluid is flushed or topped off, the system is at capacity. The pistons at the calipers are in due to the thickness of the pads. As the pads wear, the piston moves out of the caliper and stays out. The fluid in the system keeps the void behind the piston filled, making the fluid level in the reservoir go down as the pads wear. When the fluid gets low enough for the light to come on, that means it's time for pad service or a leak check.

The temperature in combination with the shaking is indicative of a possible bad wheel bearing. If the bearing is bad it will create heat as well as friction and the friction inhibits wheel rotation, like a sticking caliper. It could also be a sticking caliper, you would have to look at the pad wear at the suspect wheel in comparison to the opposing wheel to determine accelerated wear due to piston seal damage. (The piston seal is what pulls the piston back in to the caliper just enough to remove brake pressure.) The other thing that can cause a singular wheel brake issue is a stuck valve in the ABS module not allowing the fluid to back up to the master cylinder. And on the master cylinder, if the master cylinder relief valve is hanging up, you would get the same type issue, no fluid pressure release.

With temperatures that high, if the brake system is causing it the rotor will be blue, or red with extreme heat.

Run the car to the point it acts up and be close to where you can park it and jack it up shortly after. Pull the hot wheel and check the temperature of the rotor then the hub. If the hub is hotter, it's the bearing.

Another thing I noticed in the video is the alignment is off. If you are driving on a straight road and the wheel is cocked like that, the rear wheels are definitely out of alignment and the car is dog tracking. Your rear wheels are steering to the left. This will also cause vibration at speeds as well as accelerate tire wear. AWD cars with wheel assemblies out of alignment will handle crappy and shake. On your Bean, all the wheels need the toe-in set at 0.00". Front camber is good at -0.5 to -0.75. There's no rear camber adjustment, if it's off there's something bent.


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post #25 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-16-2019, 11:07 AM Thread Starter
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@cardoc, That is some excellent information there, thanks very much!

I knew the alignment was off but wanted to get all the other issues worked out first. Tires, maybe inner & outer tie rods and now this brake problem.

I pulled off the passenger side wheel this morning to see what was going on. There are two pistons on the caliper, the top one moves freely but the bottom one is completely frozen. I couldn't move it with my brake piston tool or even a big c-clamp. Unfortunately none of the local parts places have the calipers in stock so I won't have them until Monday.

I'm going to replace both front calipers, slider pins and other hardware (including the rubber parts @mprosco91 mentioned), plus pads and rotors. I assume I'll have to bleed both fronts since I'm changing the calipers, do I have to do the rears as well?

This "cheap" car I picked up is costing me a fortune...
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post #26 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-16-2019, 11:19 AM
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@cardoc, That is some excellent information there, thanks very much!

I knew the alignment was off but wanted to get all the other issues worked out first. Tires, maybe inner & outer tie rods and now this brake problem.

I pulled off the passenger side wheel this morning to see what was going on. There are two pistons on the caliper, the top one moves freely but the bottom one is completely frozen. I couldn't move it with my brake piston tool or even a big c-clamp. Unfortunately none of the local parts places have the calipers in stock so I won't have them until Monday.

I'm going to replace both front calipers, slider pins and other hardware (including the rubber parts @mprosco91 mentioned), plus pads and rotors. I assume I'll have to bleed both fronts since I'm changing the calipers, do I have to do the rears as well?

This "cheap" car I picked up is costing me a fortune...
Normally I would say you do have to bleed all 4. However I have had luck with a "technique" if you will.

Keep the old calibers attached until the very end of the job (hanging from strut or whatever). Once you have all new stuff mounted, disconnect old caliber and relatively fast, use new banjo bolt and washers to attach hose to new caliber.

Doing it this way I've had great results just bleeding the front or back (depending on what you're working on). You lose almost no fluid this way. And because you lose almost nothing, you're really just bleeding the air out of the new calibers.

Hope this helps. And hope you get everything worked out.

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post #27 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-16-2019, 06:25 PM
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I would check the wear on the rear. There's a chance it may need pads as well. As for bleeding, since the calipers are lower than the master cylinder and ABS module, gravity will let the fluid run out if the bleeder or hose is open. You can clamp off the hose to keep it from dripping out while you swap the calilpers. Parts stores usually carry simple clamps with wing nuts, or you can use vise grips if you have them. See here: https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

I would suggest that you flush out the rear while you're working on it to at least get the old fluid and water out of the system whether you do any repair at the rear or not. The water is what causes interior damage to the calipers. It's good to flush the brake fluid every couple years or every 20k miles anyway. Anther reason my VDC has the factory installed master cylinder, ABS/VDC module and calipers; because the system gets a regular flush keeping the interior clean. The outside of the calipers is rusty, though. I may have to paint them. Color suggestions?????



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post #28 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-17-2019, 10:12 AM Thread Starter
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I would check the wear on the rear. There's a chance it may need pads as well. As for bleeding, since the calipers are lower than the master cylinder and ABS module, gravity will let the fluid run out if the bleeder or hose is open.

I would suggest that you flush out the rear while you're working on it to at least get the old fluid and water out of the system whether you do any repair at the rear or not.
I thought about it overnight and as much as I hate bleeding brakes decided that I would do the rears too. When I do that I'll take a look at the rear pads & rotors (and calipers) and if they look bad I'll replace them too.

My plan for this car was to drive it myself until my son comes home from school in a few months, then let him use it through the summer since the A/C doesn't work in his car but does in this one (I think). So I figured I'll do the brakes all around, better safe than sorry.
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post #29 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-17-2019, 10:18 AM
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I thought about it overnight and as much as I hate bleeding brakes decided that I would do the rears too. When I do that I'll take a look at the rear pads & rotors (and calipers) and if they look bad I'll replace them too.



My plan for this car was to drive it myself until my son comes home from school in a few months, then let him use it through the summer since the A/C doesn't work in his car but does in this one (I think). So I figured I'll do the brakes all around, better safe than sorry.
Not a bad idea. I gotta bleed mine too. Fluid doesnt look too healthy. Lol

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post #30 of 55 (permalink) Old 03-18-2019, 07:48 AM
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On your son's car, what make/model is it? Majority of AC issues can be linked to a leak in the service ports or a joint in an AC line/hose. The seals at these areas harden and lose the ability to seal. Changing them and recharging the system usually gets them going again. You can check the compressor clutch operation by hot wiring the relay (depending on the car - European and Dodge, some Fords, use a different system that does not utilize a compressor clutch, but instead use a variable system controlled by a solenoid on the compressor. The AC is on all the time and flow is determined by several factors).



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