Squishy Brakes and oh yeah, Speed Bleeders - Page 2 - Subaru Outback - Subaru Outback Forums
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post #11 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-26-2019, 01:39 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by guntherrex View Post
my brakes were a bit squishy too (always had been) and vibey, so had them replaced a few days ago. Apparently the glide pins were seized making the pads bend to touch the disc. With new discs and refurbed calipers it's much much better.

I checked all of the guide pins. They were newer on the front. The rears were still in good shape. I did clean them up and applied new grease to all of them and there was good movement throughout. I may do the lines in the next few months and see where it stands after that.

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post #12 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-26-2019, 04:56 PM
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Here's what I do when the brake pedal just doesn't feel right.

Check brake fluid in reservoir, if it's not clean, pull it out with a baster and replace.
Jack up and support vehicle, remove wheel/tire.
Drain pan/hose from bleeder
C clamp from back of caliper through opening in the front to the outer pad
Crack open the bleeder, slowly compress the caliper, then close the bleeder again.


This does 3 things:
1. Removes almost all the old fluid from the caliper. This is usually the most contaminated fluid in the system, and bleeding the system is not effective at replacing the fluid in a caliper, especially if the piston is extended (pads aren't new). The lines themselves don't hold that much volume of fluid. If the fluid from the caliper looks nasty, I'll push some fresh fluid through the lines with the brake pedal, but rarely.
2. Allows you to check the slide mechanism of the caliper (with the piston compressed, even with the pads in place, you can slide the caliper back and forth on the pins by hand). Most importantly, that they are working together. I have seen calipers where a slide pin moves pretty well by itself, but bolted to the caliper, the system binds.
3. Ensures that the caliper piston itself is not stuck


If everything moves freely, I put the wheel back on
Step on the pedal until it feels firm again (re-extending the piston in that caliper)
Then refill the reservoir to replace the fluid pushed out of the caliper

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post #13 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-26-2019, 06:57 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Numbchux View Post
Here's what I do when the brake pedal just doesn't feel right.

Check brake fluid in reservoir, if it's not clean, pull it out with a baster and replace.
Jack up and support vehicle, remove wheel/tire.
Drain pan/hose from bleeder
C clamp from back of caliper through opening in the front to the outer pad
Crack open the bleeder, slowly compress the caliper, then close the bleeder again.


This does 3 things:
1. Removes almost all the old fluid from the caliper. This is usually the most contaminated fluid in the system, and bleeding the system is not effective at replacing the fluid in a caliper, especially if the piston is extended (pads aren't new). The lines themselves don't hold that much volume of fluid. If the fluid from the caliper looks nasty, I'll push some fresh fluid through the lines with the brake pedal, but rarely.
2. Allows you to check the slide mechanism of the caliper (with the piston compressed, even with the pads in place, you can slide the caliper back and forth on the pins by hand). Most importantly, that they are working together. I have seen calipers where a slide pin moves pretty well by itself, but bolted to the caliper, the system binds.
3. Ensures that the caliper piston itself is not stuck


If everything moves freely, I put the wheel back on
Step on the pedal until it feels firm again (re-extending the piston in that caliper)
Then refill the reservoir to replace the fluid pushed out of the caliper

This is great advice and something I hadn't even thought about! I'm going to give this a whirl this weekend. Thanks!
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