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-   -   Clutch Engagement Point Changing (https://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/111-gen-1-1995-1999/507081-clutch-engagement-point-changing.html)

Jon98EJ25 03-11-2019 10:08 AM

Clutch Engagement Point Changing
 
Hi Everyone,

In or around August of last year, I replaced everything clutch related (flywheel, disk, pressure plate, throw-out bearing, master cylinder, and slave cylinder.

A few days ago I noticed when I'm on the highway (or haven't pressed the clutch pedal for several minutes), the engagement point gets a lot closer to the floor. If I pump the pedal about four or five times, it comes back up where it's supposed to be and will stay like that unless it's not pressed again for awhile.

My question is if the master or slave need to be replaced, and if so, how can I tell which one? I don't want to end up throwing parts at it.

Also, could it just need a bleeding again?

I had a problem with this on my Maxima back in the day where I had to constantly replace the "lifetime" warranty slave cylinder. I attributed that to haggard Autozone parts.

Is it worth going to Subaru to buy legit parts to replace whichever one is going bad already?

Thanks!

dukey33 03-11-2019 10:51 AM

I would try bleeding it again first. If you are not losing any fluid that you can tell (no drips, reservoir level constant) it is possible some entrapped air is still in the system.

Andrew Claus 03-11-2019 11:47 AM

I assume there's a new hydraulic hose too. If not, that's a possible problem.

Jon98EJ25 03-11-2019 11:52 AM

Andrew, I should've mentioned that's the one thing I did not replace. How would the hose affect that? Does it balloon outward or something?

subiesailor 03-11-2019 12:06 PM

The hose is known to get soft and have some stretch and once things get warmed up usually first noticed in hot weather the clutch pedal would nearly bottom out before getting enough pressure to release the clutch.

Jon98EJ25 03-11-2019 12:20 PM

Ah okay. Maybe I'll pick one of those up and bleed everything out again. Thanks for the help.

not12listen 03-26-2019 01:45 PM

I've run into similar. Bleeding typically is the solution.


Standard bleeding doesn't work though. Get yourself a C clamp (screw style) and then unbolt the clutch master cylinder from the transmission. Put the C clamp on the slave cylinder (use a small socket to create a 'flat' end on the rod end) so it cannot extend (just snug it on). Position it so the bleeder valve is facing UPWARDS to the sky, attach your clear bleeder hose, crank open the valve on the slave cylinder then do the usual pump/hold method.


The C clamp is used to not allow the rod to extend, thereby forcing all fluid to the evacuation valve. The valve needs to face upwards due to the design allowing air pockets to collect inside. With the valve upwards, gravity will do some of the work for you - allowing air to naturally go towards the evacuation valve.


Please be aware - do NOT use full force on the clutch pedal - use GENTLE hand/arm pressure. Because the C clamp is stopping the expansive motion, 100% of that force is going to the evacuation valve. I learned the hard way - I used full foot force and broke my C clamp (that sucked).

Once you are 100% certain that all the air pockets are gone, close the evacuation valve, remove the C clamp, bolt the clutch slave back onto the transmission (be sure to NOT go near the clutch pedal during this process) - and give it a test run.

chanrobi 03-26-2019 02:08 PM

The easiest way of doing this, when I did my MC and Slave is to actually take the entire system off the car and just lay it out.

The MC, hose to the slave, (I bypassed the clutch damper), can be connected and bled off the vehicle and reinstalled as a unit. Just as the above poster described.

There will be NO question whether there is a bleeding issue.

Old hoses can be swollen or be worn out but you may not be able to see this wear.


I bled the MC seperately before replacing the hose to make the entire process easier. then connected everything off the vehicle.

Bleeding the system by pressing the clutch pedal as demonstrated by a million crappy youtube videos is not the proper way of doing it. (without blocking slave)

not12listen 03-26-2019 04:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chanrobi (Post 5800137)
The easiest way of doing this, when I did my MC and Slave is to actually take the entire system off the car and just lay it out.

The MC, hose to the slave, (I bypassed the clutch damper), can be connected and bled off the vehicle and reinstalled as a unit. Just as the above poster described.

There will be NO question whether there is a bleeding issue.

Old hoses can be swollen or be worn out but you may not be able to see this wear.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vwjrh4ezwdU

I bled the MC seperately before replacing the hose to make the entire process easier. then connected everything off the vehicle.

Bleeding the system by pressing the clutch pedal as demonstrated by a million crappy youtube videos is not the proper way of doing it. (without blocking slave)




That video is where I learned of 'blocking' the slave cylinder! It is absolutely f'n magic!


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