I'm making an Index for Service Manuals... - Subaru Outback - Subaru Outback Forums
 
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post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-07-2010, 01:46 AM Thread Starter
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I'm making an Index for Service Manuals...

I figure it's a small reciprocal gesture for all of the amazing information that the many folks on this forum help provide!
In any event, I'd greatly appreciate a Moderator/Administrator contact me to inform me how best to proceed from a practical standpoint. Additionally, any suggestions on how best to approach the material is appreciated.
My current approach is to simply list the actual Chapter Contents that correspond to the numerical heading for each Chapter.
Additionally, I am pasting the Text-Only contents beneath the entire list of Chapters. Although the diagrams and charts cannot be captured from the Service Manual files, it's my opinion that it's worth having all of the data in text form for convenient immediate reference. Other opinions welcome.
I have pasted a sample below for review and feedback before proceeding to transfer the remaining Manual Indeces.
I'm also trying to complete a synopsis on the History of the EJ25 Head Gasket Failure, as well as a brief overview of 'Box Motors' and related considerations.
Yeah, as a matter of fact I am an out-of-work writer with no life...
All feedback/advice greatly appreciated!
Gypsy
Sorry to paste all of the text below, but it's a mystery to me how to attach files (MW WORD .doc's) on this forum. So: HG essay first, 'Box Motor' second, Service Manual Index last, and I used the "Clutch" section as it was comparitvely short.
__________________________________________________ __________
Synopsis on Head Gasket failure in 1996-2004 Subaru’s

Subaru first introduced their 2.5 Liter, Four-Cylinder EJ25 motor in their Legacy Outback of 1996. The short-block is still used in their new Outbacks and has developed a sterling reputation for reliability. There are 1996's with over 400,000 miles on the original bottom end of the motors. The EJ25's reputation for power-to-weight and reliability have made it a favorite of home-built aircraft.
HOWEVER, in the 1996-2004 model years the top-end of the motor suffers from chronic Head-Gasket (hereafter referred to as “HG”) failure. The frequency of the HG failure has prompted a Class-Action lawsuit enjoining Original Buyers seeking compensation from Subaru.
The technical cause of the chronic HG failure is believed to be an engineering design flaw. Unlike most conventional engine designs where the thermostat is located above the water pump, at a relatively upper tract of the cooling system, the fine minds at Subaru located the thermostat at the lowest point of the Cooling System. This causes residual air pressure to become trapped in the upper-end of the cooling system. Consequently, when any accumulated air pressure is not regularly bled from the cooling system it will eventually far exceed the systems designed PSI tolerance and find the weakest point to vent. In the 2.5 liter version of the '96-'04 EJ25, that weakness has proven to be at the HG between the coolant journal and exhaust port.
Importantly, this specific type of failure does NOT affect the vehicle's 'apparent' drivability. Typically, the coolant does NOT leak into the oil journals or piston chambers and therefore does not contaminate the oil reservoir or ignition system or notably affect the compression and apparent power at the pedal.
Instead, Only One symptom: The Car Overheats. As the vehicle warms and the coolant system begins to pressurize, coolant is forced into the exhaust system and is often visible dripping out the tailpipe. Virtually ALL professional mechanics who have ANY knowledge of Subarus are aware of this issue. Unfortunately, too often they don't fully explain these facts to under-informed Owners. Often they'll pander to an Owner's understandable desire to keep the repair costs as low as possible, usually suggesting that maybe the overheating problem is a result of a failed Radiator Cap ($30, installed) thermostat ($100) a bad radiator ($2-400) or water pump ($400-?) as opposed to the bad news that the likely problem is failed Head Gaskets ($1500-2500 parts/labor). The radiator can be diagnosed by a coolant system pressure test (leakage) or a flow test (blockage) before simply Removing and Replacing (mechanics nomenclature “R&R”ing) the radiator as a solution. Regardless, the simple (half-hour) diagnostic procedure of dropping the exhaust-pipe manifold flange and observing any dripping coolant will reveal if there's coolant leakage through the Head Gasket.
The reason for the large spectrum in the quotes for HG repair are many. Any particular repair shop's overhead and subsequent hourly shop rate, the shop's location, etc. are all factors. Primarily, however, the reason for the disparity is that while doing the HG R&R there are many legitimate decisions that must be made regarding additional related work: should the cylinder heads be re-surfaced (Very good idea $2-300) valves replaced (not critical unless damaged, add $3-600) or the heads replaced entirely (very rarely necessary, $8-1200).
It is foolish not to agree to the additional expense to replace the: timing belt ($75), timing belt tensioner ($250), water pump ($100) and thermostat ($30). All of these parts must be removed for the Head Gasket replacement procedure anyway, therefore you are only paying for the replacement parts (typically $300-500 non OEM vs. OEM), typically with no additional labor charge. Replacing all of these parts insures that the expensive repair of the HG's won't soon be repeated due to the failure of some comparitively insignificant part. This is also an argument for replacing the radiator even though it likely hasn't yet failed.
A crucial aspect to the HG R&R is the procedure for bleeding air from the coolant system after completing the work. Subaru also has a required coolant additive (usually referred to as a "wetter") that coats the coolant journals making them 'slippery' which helps prevent any air in the system from becoming trapped in any one location where it may potentially cause component or gasket failure.
This HG's don't seem to fail in Subaru's 2.2 liter version of the engine, presumably this is because it has a smaller bore and therefore more HG gasket area dividing the coolant journal and exhaust port. Additionally, maybe the fact that the Original Buyer chose the less powerful motor reflects less aggressive driving habits and consequently translates into less stress on the motor...
Considering that Subaru dealers were forced to absorb the expense of repairing cars with failed HG's while still under warranty, Subaru redesigned their Head Gakets and are currently on the third version. The current OEM HG, released around 2006, is comprised of FOUR gasket-layers, (thin/thin/thick/thin). It is possible to determine if a car has the latest HG's by inspecting the protruding edge of the gasket, visible beneath the intake manifold spider in various places. While this is no guarantee that the overheating problem is NOT HG-related, it is cause for hope that any overheating may be caused by the thermostat, radiator or water pump, all of which can be replaced without removing the motor, as is required for the HG R&R.
Hopefully this tutorial has been useful.
__________________________________________________ ______

Explanation: the term “Box”, “Crate”, “JDM (Japan Domestic Motor)” Engine

In Japan, at the five year-old mark they have a very expensive ($1,000's) government-mandated inspection fee. Essentially, this is a federal policy device intended to pressure drivers to buy new cars every five years. To a large extent it works, and the trade-in cars have only five-years of Japanese driving, typically 35K miles. An industry has grown around these cars in which they pull the entire drive-trains, "Crate" them up (hence the term 'Box Motor'), containerize and ship them to West Coast US ports. Dozens of companies from San Diego to Seattle are involved in the wholesale and retail sales of these engines. Typically, A customer can purchase either a short-block (Engine minus Cylinder Heads), a long-block (complete, assembled engine, including Cylinder Heads), or purchase Cylinder Heads separately. Product line and availability varies among importers.
Each company (usually) modifies the engines as necessary for each specific engine type to meet California Emissions Standards. Often, this includes drilling and tapping an EGR port where necessary in the Cylinder Head(s). Always ask if the engine you are buying will meet local emissions requirements, as some engines are not modified by the US Importer/Seller and remain stock only to Japan's domestic emissions specifications.
Another crucial consideration with ‘Box Motors’ is that most Sellers do nothing to the engines other than what is basically required. This means that they DO NOT replace ANY Head Gaskets, Oil Pumps, Oil Seals, Gaskets, etc., NOR do they perform ANY Valve Adjustments or other mechanical work to their engines.
Unfortunately, the Six-Month engine warranty that most Sellers provide is immediately voided if a Buyer removes the Cylinder Heads or performs other work to the engine. Some Sellers may be willing to negotiate with a particular Buyer to perform any/all of this work before delivery. This extra expense may be wise for the less-mechanical Buyer because it preserves the warranty while simultaneously giving the Buyer confidence that the ‘Box Motor’ has all-new peripheral parts. Prior to agreeing to a price with the Seller, obtain a quote for identical work (mention that the engine is already out!) from a reputable shop to insure that they the Seller is asking a comparatively reasonable fee for the additional engine prep.
Regardless, while the engine is conveniently out of the vehicle, any Buyer must weigh the trade-off of a six-month warranty versus the long-term reliability of installing new engine parts. In the case of the Subaru EJ25 (2.5 liter, issues from 1996-04), it only makes sense to replace the inferior original-release Head Gaskets with the latest generation OEM Head Gaskets. The six-month warranty is no hedge against the extreme probability that the original Head Gaskets are going to fail, and their warranty does NOT cover the labor costs to R&R (remove and replace) the engine a second time. And even though the “Box motor” may only have 35K miles, it only makes sense to replace all of the oil seals and gaskets before installing the engine
That's the extent of my knowledge regarding the origination and background of the 'Box' motor industry and related issues.
Any corrections or additions are welcome.
Gypsy
__________________________________________________ ______________
Note: The Legend below is based on the LAST THREE numbers in the downloadable manual lists. Example: “MSASTCD99L129” is 129 below.
All text –without diagrams- continues beneath the numbered Legend, which may be useful for rapid data retrieval. The diagrams were not transferable so please refer to the manual for all Diagrams and Charts. Gypsy
__________________________________________________ _______

1999 Service Manual CLUTCH section Legend:

129. Clutch Specs.
130. Parts Diagram
131. Parts Diagram B
132. CAUTIONS
133. Cautions con’t, ADJUSTMENTS
134. Release (throw-out) bearing, & DISC Service
135. 134 Con’t. & COVER (Pressure Plate) Service
136. Slave Cylinder Service
137. Master Cylinder Service
138. Fluid Procedures
139. DIAGNOSTIC CHARTS


1999 Service Manual CLUTCH section, text only:

1. Clutch System
2200 cc 2500 cc
Clutch cover Diaphragm set load kg (lb) 450 (992) 550 (1,213)
Clutch disc
Facing material Woven
O.D. ´ I.D. ´ thickness mm (in) 225 ´ 150 ´ 3.5 (8.86 ´ 5.91 ´ 0.138)
Spline O.D. (No. of teeth) mm (in) 25.2 (0.992) (24)
Depth of rivet head mm
(in)
Standard 1.3 — 1.9 (0.051 — 0.075)
Limit of sinking 0.3 (0.012)
Limit for runout mm (in) 1.0 (0.039) at R = 107 (4.21)
Clutch release lever ratio 3.0 1.6
Release bearing Grease-packed self-aligning
Release lever
Stroke mm (in) 24 — 26 (0.94 — 1.02)
Play at release lever center mm (in) 3 — 4 (0.12 — 0.16)
Clutch pedal Full stroke mm (in)
140 — 150
(5.51 — 5.91)
130 — 135
(5.12 — 5.31)
2
2-10 [S100] SPECIFICATIONS AND SERVICE DATA
1. Clutch System
1. Clutch System
A: MECHANICAL APPLICATION TYPE
B2M0632C
(1) Clutch cable bracket
(2) Clutch release lever sealing
(3) Retainer spring
(4) Pivot
(5) Clutch release lever
(6) Clip
(7) Clutch release bearing
(8) Clutch cover
(9) Clutch disc
(10) Return spring (Models without
hill holder only)
(11) Clutch return spring bracket
Tightening torque: N·m (kg-m, ft-lb)
T1: 15.7± 1.5 (1.6± 0.15, 11.6± 1.1)
3
[C1A0] 2-10 COMPONENT PARTS
1. Clutch System
B: HYDRAULIC APPLICATION TYPE
B2M1890A
(1) Operating cylinder
(2) Washer
(3) Clutch hose
(4) Bracket
(5) Clamp
(6) Pipe
(7) Master cylinder ASSY
(8) Clevis pin
(9) Snap pin
(10) Lever
(11) Clutch release lever sealing
(12) Retainer spring
(13) Pivot
(14) Release lever
(15) Clip
(16) Release bearing
(17) Clutch cover
(18) Clutch disc
(19) Flywheel
Tightening torque: N·m (kg-m, ft-lb)
T1: 15.7± 1.5 (1.6± 0.15, 11.6± 1.1)
T2: 18± 3 (1.8± 0.3, 13.0± 2.2)
T3: 37± 3 (3.8± 0.3, 27.5± 2.2)
4
2-10 [C1B0] COMPONENT PARTS
1. Clutch System
2. Master Cylinder and Reservoir Tank
S2M0005A
(1) Reservoir cap
(2) Reservoir tank
(3) Oil seal
(4) Straight pin
(5) Master cylinder
(6) Washer
(7) Diaphragm spring
(8) Seat
(9) Return spring
(10) Piston
(11) Push rod
(12) Piston stop ring
Tightening torque: N·m (kg-m, ft-lb)
T: 46.6± 7.4 (4.75± 0.75, 34.4± 5.4)
5
[C200] 2-10 COMPONENT PARTS
2. Master Cylinder and Reservoir Tank
1. General
A: PRECAUTION
When servicing clutch system, pay attention to the
following items.
1. MECHANICAL APPLICATION TYPE
1) Check the routing of clutch cable for smoothness.
2) Excessive tightness or looseness of clutch
cable have a bad influence upon the cable durability.
3) Apply grease sufficiently to the connecting portion
of clutch pedal.
4) Apply grease sufficiently to the release lever
portion.
5) Position clutch cable through the center of toe
board hole and route it smoothly. Adjustment is
done by moving the outer cable.
6) Make sure not to let the clutch chatter when
starting forward or rearward. If clutch chattering
occurs, readjust so that the bend of clutch outer
cable becomes flatter.
2. HYDRAULIC APPLICATION TYPE
1) Check fluid level using a scale on outside of
reservoir tank. If the level is below “MIN”, add
clutch fluid to bring it up to “MAX”.
Recommended clutch fluid:
FMVSS No. 116, fresh DOT3 or DOT4
brake fluid
CAUTION:
I Avoid mixing different brakes of brake fluid
to prevent degradation of the fluid.
I Be careful not to allow dirt or dust to get into
the reservoir tank.
I Use fresh DOT3 or DOT4 brake fluid when
refilling fluid.
S2M0351A
2) Make sure that brake fluid does not leak from
master cylinder, operating cylinder and piping.
3) Apply grease sufficiently to the release lever
pinion.
4) Check for proper clutch disengagement and
clutch pedal return ability.
2. On-car Service
A: ADJUSTMENT
1. MECHANICAL APPLICATION TYPE
1) Remove release lever return spring from lever
(Models without hill holder only).
2) Adjust spherical nut so that the play is within the
specified value at the lever end (center of spherical
nut).
Play:
3 — 4 mm (0.12 — 0.16 in)
Full stroke:
24 — 26 mm (0.94 — 1.02 in)
CAUTION:
Take care not to twist the cable during adjustment.
G2M0234
3) Upon completion of adjustment, securely lock
spherical nut with lock nut.
G2M0235
4) Install return spring on lever (Models without hill
holder only).
NOTE:
Hook the long hook side of the return spring with
the lever (Models without hill holder only).
6
2-10 [W1A0] SERVICE PROCEDURE
1. General
3. Release Bearing and Lever
A: REMOVAL
1. MECHANICAL APPLICATION TYPE
1) Remove transmission assembly from vehicle
body.
<Ref. to 2-11 [W2B0].>
2) Remove release lever return spring (Models
without hill holder only).
3) Remove the two clips from clutch release lever
and remove release bearing.
CAUTION:
Be careful not to deform clips.
4) Remove release lever seal.
B2M0633D
(A) Release lever return spring
(B) Clip
(C) Release lever
(D) Release lever seal
(E) Retainer spring
(F) Clutch release lever
5) Remove release lever retainer spring from
release lever pivot with a screwdriver by accessing
it through clutch housing release lever hole. Then
remove release lever.
B2M0174A
2. HYDRAULIC APPLICATION TYPE
1) Remove transmission assembly from vehicle
body.
<Ref. to 2-11 [W2B0].>
2) Remove operating cylinder.
<Ref. to 2-10 [W5A0].>
3) Remove the two clips from clutch release lever
and remove release bearing.
CAUTION:
Be careful not to deform clips.
4) Remove release lever seal.
B2M1257G
(A) Operating cylinder
(B) Clip
(C) Clutch release lever
(D) Release bearing
(E) Release lever seal
8
2-10 [W3A1] SERVICE PROCEDURE
3. Release Bearing and Lever
5) Remove release lever retainer spring from
release lever pivot with a screwdriver by accessing
it through clutch housing release lever hole. Then
remove release lever.
B2M1258A
B: INSPECTION
1. RELEASE BEARING
CAUTION:
Since this bearing is grease sealed and is of a
nonlubrication type, do not wash with gasoline
or any solvent when servicing the clutch.
1) Check the bearing for smooth movement by
applying force in the radial direction.
Radial direction stroke:
FWD; Approx.
1.0 mm (0.039 in)
AWD; Approx.
1.4 mm (0.055 in)
B2M0173A
2) Check the bearing for smooth rotation by applying
pressure in the thrust direction.
G2M0240
3) Check wear and damage of bearing case surface
contacting with lever.
2. RELEASE LEVER
1) Check lever pivot portion and the point of contact
with release bearing case for wear.
G2M0241
C: INSTALLATION
CAUTION:
Before or during assembling, lubricate the following
points with a light coat of grease.
I Inner groove of release bearing
I Contact surface of lever and pivot
I Contact surface of lever and bearing
I Transmission main shaft spline (Use grease
containing molybdenum disulphide.)
9
[W3C0] 2-10 SERVICE PROCEDURE
3. Release Bearing and Lever
1. MECHANICAL APPLICATION TYPE
1) While pushing release lever to pivot and twisting
it to both sides, fit retainer spring onto the constricted
portion of pivot.
NOTE:
Confirm that retainer spring is securely fitted by
observing it through the main case hole.
2) Install release bearing and fasten it with two
clips.
3) Install release lever seal.
B2M0633E
(A) Release lever return spring
(B) Clip
(C) Release lever
(D) Release lever seal
(E) Retainer spring
(F) Release lever bearing
4) After remounting engine and transmission on
body, make adjustment of the clutch release lever
end play.
CAUTION:
Take care not to twist the cable during adjustment.
G2M0235
5) Install release lever return spring (Models without
hill holder only).
NOTE:
Hook up the return spring to right side hole of the
release lever.
10
2-10 [W3C1] SERVICE PROCEDURE
3. Release Bearing and Lever
2. HYDRAULIC APPLICATION TYPE
1) While pushing release lever to pivot and twisting
it to both sides, fit retainer spring onto the constricted
portion of pivot.
NOTE:
I Apply grease (SUNLIGHT 2: P/N 003602010) to
contact point of release lever and operating cylinder.
I Confirm that retainer spring is securely fitted by
observing it through the main case hole.
2) Install release bearing and fasten it with two
clips.
3) Install release lever seal.
4) Install operating cylinder.
Tightening torque:
T: 37± 3 N·m (3.8± 0.3 kg-m, 27.5± 2.2 ft-lb)
B2M1257F
(A) Release lever
(B) Retainer spring
(C) Release bearing
(D) Clip
(E) Release lever seal
(F) Operating cylinder
5) After remounting engine and transmission on
body.
<Ref. to 2-11 [W2C0].>
6) Bleed air from oil line with the help of a coworker.
<Ref. to 2-10 [W2A2].>
4. Clutch Disc and Cover
A: REMOVAL
1) Install ST on flywheel.
ST 498497100C RANKSHAFT STOPPER
G2M0242
2) Remove clutch cover and clutch disc.
CAUTION:
I Take care not to allow oil on the clutch disc
facing.
I Do not disassemble either clutch cover or
clutch disc.
3) Remove flywheel.
G2M0243
11
[W4A0] 2-10 SERVICE PROCEDURE
4. Clutch Disc and Cover
2. HYDRAULIC APPLICATION TYPE
1) While pushing release lever to pivot and twisting
it to both sides, fit retainer spring onto the constricted
portion of pivot.
NOTE:
I Apply grease (SUNLIGHT 2: P/N 003602010) to
contact point of release lever and operating cylinder.
I Confirm that retainer spring is securely fitted by
observing it through the main case hole.
2) Install release bearing and fasten it with two
clips.
3) Install release lever seal.
4) Install operating cylinder.
Tightening torque:
T: 37± 3 N·m (3.8± 0.3 kg-m, 27.5± 2.2 ft-lb)
B2M1257F
(A) Release lever
(B) Retainer spring
(C) Release bearing
(D) Clip
(E) Release lever seal
(F) Operating cylinder
5) After remounting engine and transmission on
body.
<Ref. to 2-11 [W2C0].>
6) Bleed air from oil line with the help of a coworker.
<Ref. to 2-10 [W2A2].>
4. Clutch Disc and Cover
A: REMOVAL
1) Install ST on flywheel.
ST 498497100C RANKSHAFT STOPPER
G2M0242
2) Remove clutch cover and clutch disc.
CAUTION:
I Take care not to allow oil on the clutch disc
facing.
I Do not disassemble either clutch cover or
clutch disc.
3) Remove flywheel.
G2M0243
11
[W4A0] 2-10 SERVICE PROCEDURE
4. Clutch Disc and Cover
B: INSPECTION
1. CLUTCH DISC
1) Facing wear
Measure the depth of rivet head from the surface
of facing. Replace if facings are worn locally or
worn down to less than the specified value.
Depth of rivet head:
Standard value
1.3 — 1.9 mm (0.051 — 0.075 in)
Limit of sinking
0.3 mm (0.012 in)
CAUTION:
Do not wash clutch disc with any cleaning
fluid.
B2M0328
2) Hardened facing
Correct by using emery paper or replace.
3) Oil soakage on facing
Replace clutch disc and inspect transmission front
oil seal, transmission case mating surface, engine
rear oil seal and other points for oil leakage.
B2M0329A
4) Deflection on facing
If deflection exceeds the specified value at the
outer circumference of facing, repair or replace.
Limit for deflection:
1.0 mm (0.039 in) at R = 107 mm (4.21 in)
B2M0330A
5) Worn spline, loose rivets and torsion spring failure
Replace defective parts.
B2M0333A
2. CLUTCH COVER
NOTE:
Visually check for the following items without
disassembling, and replace or repair if defective.
1) Loose thrust rivet.
2) Damaged or worn bearing contact area at center
of diaphragm spring.
G2M0248
12
2-10 [W4B1] SERVICE PROCEDURE
4. Clutch Disc and Cover
3) Damaged or worn disc contact surface of pressure
plate.
4) Loose strap plate setting bolt.
5) Worn diaphragm sliding surface.
G2M0249
3. FLYWHEEL
CAUTION:
Since this bearing is grease sealed and is of a
nonlubrication type, do not wash with gasoline
or any solvent.
1) Damage of facing and ring gear
If defective, replace flywheel.
G2M0250
2) Smoothness of rotation
Rotate ball bearing applying pressure in thrust
direction.
3) If noise or excessive play is noted, replace ball
bearing as follows:
(1) Drive out ball bearing from flywheel.
(2) Press bearing into flywheel until bearing
end surface is flush with clutch disc contact surface
of flywheel. Do not press inner race.
ST 899754112 SNAP RING PRESS
H2M1563A
C: INSTALLATION
1) Install flywheel and ST.
ST 498497100 CRANKSHAFT STOPPER
B2M0332A
2) Tighten the flywheel attaching bolts to the
specified torque.
NOTE:
Tighten flywheel installing bolts gradually. Each
bolt should be tightened to the specified torque in
a crisscross fashion.
Tightening torque:
72± 3 N·m (7.3± 0.3 kg-m, 52.8± 2.2 ft-lb)
B2M0331B
13
[W4C0] 2-10 SERVICE PROCEDURE
4. Clutch Disc and Cover
3) Insert ST into the clutch disc and install them on
the flywheel by inserting the ST end into the pilot
bearing.
ST 499747100 CLUTCH DISC GUIDE
G2M0253
4) Install clutch cover on flywheel and tighten bolts
to the specified torque.
NOTE:
I When installing the clutch cover on the flywheel,
position the clutch cover so that there is a gap of
120° or more between “0” marks on the flywheel
and clutch cover. (“0” marks indicate the directions
of residual unbalance.)
I Note the front and rear of the clutch disc when
installing.
I Tighten clutch cover installing bolts gradually.
Each bolt should be tightened to the specified
torque in a crisscross fashion.
Tightening torque:
15.7± 1.5 N·m (1.6± 0.15 kg-m, 11.6± 1.1
ft-lb)
5) Remove ST.
ST 499747100 CLUTCH DISC GUIDE
B2M1011A
14
2-10 [W4C0] SERVICE PROCEDURE
4. Clutch Disc and Cover
5. Operating Cylinder
A: REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION
1) Remove air chamber.
<Ref. to 2-7 [W18A0].>
B2M1265
2) Remove clutch hose from operating cylinder.
CAUTION:
Cover hose joint to prevent brake fluid from
flowing out.
B2M1179B
3) Remove operating cylinder from transmission.
B2M1263
4) Installation is in the reverse order of removal.
NOTE:
Before installing operating cylinder, apply grease
(SUNLIGHT 2: P/N 003602010) to contact point of
release lever and operating cylinder.
Tightening torque:
T1: 18± 3 N·m (1.8± 0.3 kg-m, 13.0± 2.2 ft-lb)
T2: 37± 3 N·m (3.8± 0.3 kg-m, 27.5± 2.2 ft-lb)
B2M1179C
5) After bleeding air from operating cylinder,
ensure that clutch operates properly.
<Ref. to 2-10 [W2A2].>
15
[W5A0] 2-10 SERVICE PROCEDURE
5. Operating Cylinder
6. Master Cylinder and
Reservoir Tank
A: REMOVAL
1) Thoroughly drain brake fluid from reservoir
tank.
2) Remove snap pin, clevis pin and separate push
rod of master cylinder from clutch pedal.
B4M1189A
3) Remove clutch pipe from master cylinder.
4) Remove master cylinder with reservoir tank.
CAUTION:
Be extremely careful not to spill brake fluid.
Brake fluid spilt on the vehicle body will harm
the paint surface; wipe it off quickly if spilt.
S2M0352A
B: DISASSEMBLY
1) Remove straight pin and reservoir tank.
S2M0356A
2) Remove oil seal.

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post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-07-2010, 05:36 PM
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Join Date: May 2010
Location: Atlanta, Ga
Car: 2002 OB MT, 2.5L, 170k mi.
Posts: 37
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"Subaru located the thermostat at the lowest point of the Cooling System. This causes residual air pressure to become trapped in the upper-end of the cooling system. Consequently, when any accumulated air pressure is not regularly bled from the cooling system it will eventually far exceed the systems designed PSI tolerance and find the weakest point to vent. In the 2.5 liter version of the '96-'04 EJ25, that weakness has proven to be at the HG between the coolant journal and exhaust port."

So Two stupid questions for anyone to answer.
1. Would it be possible to relocate the thermostat above the pump? and would this fix the issue?
2. In warmer climates would removing the thermostat all together fix the issue as well?

Just brainstorming since I just bought a 2002 OB 2.5L

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post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-07-2010, 06:22 PM Thread Starter
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Location: The Road
Car: '96 Outback 2.2/F350
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Yowza... I thought my post was going directly to...

[RIGHT]a moderator/administrator forum. I was hoping to get some technical direction/feedback/correction before continuing my Service Manual Index translations.
Guess it doesn't rally matter, but hopefully some ranking member can help out.
In any event, in answer to your inquiry about relocating or removing the thermo, a few things:
There is a precautionary fix that people have been using in home aviation applications of the EJ25. Essentially, an above-motor mounted air purge setup. I forget the technical name for the setup but it allows excess air to bubble out through a one-way immersed valve system.
As for leaving the thermo out entirely, in a warm climate you're welcome to try it. However, the grooved-rubber coolant seal that fits around the circular outside edge of the thermo would not have any material support within its recessed groove. This m a y pose a leak problem at the thermo housing seam or it may not. I suppose you could tear out the guts of a thermo and retain the outside metallic ring to support the rubber seal... a friend's compromised solution to what you're suggesting was to drill-out the existing 1/8th inch 'flow hole' located on the face of the thermo to about 1/2 inch. He reasoned that it would both adequately inhibit coolant flow until reaching operating temperature while allowing air to easily pass even if the thermo plunger was still closed. So far, so good.
Still, none of this goofiness should be necessary if you have the latest generation OEM Head Gaskets, you've added the little bottle of OEM 'Coolant Conditioner', and properly air-bled the coolant system (I'm fairly certain that procedure is detailed at various locations on this forum).
Good Luck
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post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-07-2010, 06:29 PM
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Originally Posted by gypsy View Post
[RIGHT]. . . Still, none of this goofiness should be necessary if you have the latest generation OEM Head Gaskets, you've added the little bottle of OEM 'Coolant Conditioner', and properly air-bled the coolant system (I'm fairly certain that procedure is detailed at various locations on this forum).
Good Luck
Shouldn't be necessary even for the earlier versions, at least in regard to HG leaks between the combustion cylinder and the cooling jacket. The Coolant Conditioner was introduced for the earlier engines, and was to prevent external leaks from the cooling jacket to the outside. (See my post here: https://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/...tml#post243639)
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post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-07-2010, 06:43 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks, Plain OM. Any chance of directing me where to

submit the Service Manual Index translations. It's not clear to me where/how to send these for review. The central objective is to get some ultra-qualified advice towards improving my approach towards these translations before continuing to invest the substantial time required to transfer and translate all of these Indices.
It would also be great to get ultra-qualified technical/histiorical proof-reading of the 'Head Gasket Failure Synopsis' as well as any advisable editing to the 'Box Motor Synopsis'.
Obviously, your own highly qualified input is greatly appreciated as well.
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