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  Topic Review (Newest First)
03-31-2019 02:58 PM
SmokeyBear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fibber2 View Post
Nothing new here, actually. Your existing TPMS sensors broadcast 4 pieces of data: pressure, temperature, battery status and their ID code. Some higher end cars might display the temps along with pressure, but the vast majority do no.

I suppose that if you were cruising the Autobahn at 135 mph for a few hours, the potential of a tire with a broken belt overheating from internal friction and disintegrating might be of some concern. Less so to most of us....
I thought this was a thing for us....
WOulda been cool to see what temps the tires get up to from -60’s when frozen flat.
03-30-2019 10:33 PM
Fibber2
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeyBear View Post
Wait, wut?
Where is this feature?
What’s tire temp useful for? I know racing, but we aren’t racing Outbacks lol
Nothing new here, actually. Your existing TPMS sensors broadcast 4 pieces of data: pressure, temperature, battery status and their ID code. Some higher end cars might display the temps along with pressure, but the vast majority do no.

I suppose that if you were cruising the Autobahn at 135 mph for a few hours, the potential of a tire with a broken belt overheating from internal friction and disintegrating might be of some concern. Less so to most of us....
03-30-2019 01:56 PM
SmokeyBear
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmwarner View Post
Wait, wut?
Where is this feature?
What’s tire temp useful for? I know racing, but we aren’t racing Outbacks lol
03-30-2019 01:26 PM
Fibber2 So you still havethe originals (28103FLxxx 433mhz) sensors? If you haven't messed with what's stored in the car's computer, no reprogramming/upload should be required.

Please let us know what they find when they take out the clone sensors.
03-29-2019 02:22 PM
Rad Dad
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fibber2 View Post
Over the years I've built up 4 sets of winter tires, and I too like to source my own sensors. Assuming it goes well, and I've personally never had an issue, you can save a ton of $$$ that way. But I also have the tools (a Quickset and an older sensor pinging tool). I recently purchased a full feature programming tool (Autel TS508) and blank sensors, so will continue doing it for my family and friends.

On the subject of breakage, there are specific instructions that installers must follow on placement of the bead set arm and mount/demount hardware to stay away from the sensor body. You can also damage them during insertion. I recently bought an expensive little torque wrench for accurately seating the nut (I like metal stems). Whenever possible, I try to stay in view of the tech doing the sensor and tire install to be sure they don't break anything. Luckily, only once have I have to yell "STOP!" to a guy who was about to wipe one out on the tire changing station.

But if only one was broken, you should still have valid readings from the remaining good units. Same if they mistyped one of the hex codes. The issue seems to be 'bigger' than simply one not working.

So we still have an unsuccessful 'write' of the hex codes plus the correct transmission protocol for a 2017-2019 Subaru as a strong possibility.

One real outlier thought here:
I once purchased Schrader sourced Subaru specific sensors (part number 282013). They arrived so deeply asleep that just driving did not bring them to life. They had to be pinged (125KHz wakeup) before they would transmit. Now I would think that the act of programming the universal 33500 sensors and then reading them back to verify successful programming would accomplish this, and you'd be good forever. But who knows.... Getting someone to read them out would resolve this question.
Well, I went to the tire shop and the two rear had codes and the two front did not.

I'm just going to take my four originals with me to American tire and have them reprogram them.

I have no idea what the issue is so hopefully just reprogramming them works.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
03-29-2019 07:59 AM
Fibber2 Over the years I've built up 4 sets of winter tires, and I too like to source my own sensors. Assuming it goes well, and I've personally never had an issue, you can save a ton of $$$ that way. But I also have the tools (a Quickset and an older sensor pinging tool). I recently purchased a full feature programming tool (Autel TS508) and blank sensors, so will continue doing it for my family and friends.

On the subject of breakage, there are specific instructions that installers must follow on placement of the bead set arm and mount/demount hardware to stay away from the sensor body. You can also damage them during insertion. I recently bought an expensive little torque wrench for accurately seating the nut (I like metal stems). Whenever possible, I try to stay in view of the tech doing the sensor and tire install to be sure they don't break anything. Luckily, only once have I have to yell "STOP!" to a guy who was about to wipe one out on the tire changing station.

But if only one was broken, you should still have valid readings from the remaining good units. Same if they mistyped one of the hex codes. The issue seems to be 'bigger' than simply one not working.

So we still have an unsuccessful 'write' of the hex codes plus the correct transmission protocol for a 2017-2019 Subaru as a strong possibility.

One real outlier thought here:
I once purchased Schrader sourced Subaru specific sensors (part number 282013). They arrived so deeply asleep that just driving did not bring them to life. They had to be pinged (125KHz wakeup) before they would transmit. Now I would think that the act of programming the universal 33500 sensors and then reading them back to verify successful programming would accomplish this, and you'd be good forever. But who knows.... Getting someone to read them out would resolve this question.
03-29-2019 12:05 AM
N4HHE
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rad Dad View Post
So I picked up the 33500 EZ Senor set from TPMS .com. First I went to the local tire store, had the sensors read and then gave the hex codes to the TPMS.

When the cloned set came in, I had the local tire store mount, balance and install the sensors. The tire shop marked which tire went where so it would be as if I still have the stock wheel set on.

Well, I put on the new set and the car is not reading the sensors and the TPMS light is flashing/solid.

My question is, would putting the wheels in the wrong order throw the light?
Or did my tire shop just not install the sensors?
Why did you not pay the tire shop to procure clonable sensors and install? Then they would bear the cost and responsibility to make the sensors work.

Is pretty hard to damage a TPMS sensor during installation.

You are correct, the sensors are not installed, not working, or incorrectly programmed. Start by having someone use a TPMS reader to scan for codes.
03-28-2019 10:57 PM
Rad Dad
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fibber2 View Post
I want to make sure I'm following this.... You have a 2019 with the newer 433 mhz system. You had a shop read out the Hex codes from your OE wheel set. They gave you the codes and you sent them to TPMS.COM. They programmed a new set of Schrader dual band sensors to be a clone of your OE sensor, and you had them built into a new wheel/tire package. As clones, the system should have recognized them. You did not have anybody touch your OBD port and disturb the data that was loaded into the car.



Hmmmm.....



No, the car should have not just recognized the clones, it should have adjusted automatically for the position they were placed in. Localized antenna reads out your codes and 'moves' them around your dash screen as needed.



The 33500 can use either the rubber or metal valve stems. Either way, they look different from standard rubber (non-tpms) valves, so you should be able to tell if the sensors are there.



Maybe TPMS.com failed in the 'writing' step, and your sensors are not properly programmed?



Maybe your installer damaged one when mounting the tire?



You can try having them read by a local shop to see if they are all good.
Thanks for following along.

If one was damaged during installation, do you believe that none of the sensors would read?


Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
03-28-2019 10:51 PM
Fibber2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rad Dad View Post
So I picked up the 33500 EZ Senor set from TPMS .com. First I went to the local tire store, had the sensors read and then gave the hex codes to the TPMS.

When the cloned set came in, I had the local tire store mount, balance and install the sensors. The tire shop marked which tire went where so it would be as if I still have the stock wheel set on.

Well, I put on the new set and the car is not reading the sensors and the TPMS light is flashing/solid.

My question is, would putting the wheels in the wrong order throw the light? Or did my tire shop just not install the sensors?
I want to make sure I'm following this.... You have a 2019 with the newer 433 mhz system. You had a shop read out the Hex codes from your OE wheel set. They gave you the codes and you sent them to TPMS.COM. They programmed a new set of Schrader dual band sensors to be a clone of your OE sensor, and you had them built into a new wheel/tire package. As clones, the system should have recognized them. You did not have anybody touch your OBD port and disturb the data that was loaded into the car.

Hmmmm.....

No, the car should have not just recognized the clones, it should have adjusted automatically for the position they were placed in. Localized antenna reads out your codes and 'moves' them around your dash screen as needed.

The 33500 can use either the rubber or metal valve stems. Either way, they look different from standard rubber (non-tpms) valves, so you should be able to tell if the sensors are there.

Maybe TPMS.com failed in the 'writing' step, and your sensors are not properly programmed?

Maybe your installer damaged one when mounting the tire?

You can try having them read by a local shop to see if they are all good.
03-28-2019 03:44 PM
Rad Dad So I picked up the 33500 EZ Senor set from TPMS .com. First I went to the local tire store, had the sensors read and then gave the hex codes to the TPMS.


When the cloned set came in, I had the local tire store mount, balance and install the sensors. The tire shop marked which tire went where so it would be as if I still have the stock wheel set on.


Well, I put on the new set and the car is not reading the sensors and the TPMS light is flashing/solid.

My question is, would putting the wheels in the wrong order throw the light?
Or did my tire shop just not install the sensors?








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