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Thread: Gen5: Replacing the original battery with BETTER Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
06-12-2019 05:54 PM
jakemccoy
Quote:
Originally Posted by stfsubaru View Post
Is there a recommended website that reviews all the numbering and the various labels for vehicle batteries? Previously, I've just gone to an automotive supply store, had them do a load-test on the alternator, and if that was fine, but the battery wasn't - just purchased a quality battery with as many CCAs and highest RC my wallet would bare at the time.

I've had what I figured were perfectly good batteries die before the typical minimum predicted lifespan of 3yrs. And I've had batteries that have lasted 7yrs or more.

The problem - they don't always provide good information as to their rate of degraded performance. Sometimes you know from a few times of hard-starting you are coming up on an issue that might be alternator related, providing you are taking long enough trips for recharging... Sometimes, there's little warning and it's all battery.

For now, I think I'll travel with a Lithium jump starter in the vehicle. That way, I may be of aid to others too. Pay it forward resonates with me.

But the very first hint of unreliability of the battery - I'm replacing it with something that has at least 2x the CCA rating and much better reserve capacity.
I don’t know of any report, but I have read a ton of posts on this site. I have not yet read a post about somebody having issues after replacement with a high RC battery.

Probably the best way to test your charging system is a cheap voltmeter in the cigarette lighter socket. I bought one for $1.89 on Ebay. I have read about some model years having issues with the alternator charging. Like, their alternator wouldn’t charge while idling for example. Subaru was allegedly attempting to increase mpg. Anyway, based on my tracking of voltage via the lighter socket, the alternator in my 2018 OB charges whenever the engine is running.
06-12-2019 05:43 PM
AvidHiker
Quote:
Originally Posted by stfsubaru View Post
Is there a recommended website that reviews all the numbering and the various labels for vehicle batteries?...
Consumer Reports is the only group I'm aware of that makes any serious effort to test a variety of batteries on a regular basis. Of course, they can't test everything, but they seem to pick respected/common brands. If you're good with Google, you can find PDFs of their reviews posted here and there covering 2016-2018.
https://www.consumerreports.org/car-...s-of-the-year/

The Interstate MTP-24, for example, has been a top rated flooded battery (with standard terminal arrangement) for a few years running now, and Group 24 is the biggest you can fit in current Outbacks without modification. Only catch with the MTP line is I believe they have to be purchased either direct from Interstate or possibly from your local mechanic if he's a dealer (e.g., Costco only carries a lower end Interstate model).
06-12-2019 05:08 PM
stfsubaru Is there a recommended website that reviews all the numbering and the various labels for vehicle batteries? Previously, I've just gone to an automotive supply store, had them do a load-test on the alternator, and if that was fine, but the battery wasn't - just purchased a quality battery with as many CCAs and highest RC my wallet would bare at the time.

I've had what I figured were perfectly good batteries die before the typical minimum predicted lifespan of 3yrs. And I've had batteries that have lasted 7yrs or more.

The problem - they don't always provide good information as to their rate of degraded performance. Sometimes you know from a few times of hard-starting you are coming up on an issue that might be alternator related, providing you are taking long enough trips for recharging... Sometimes, there's little warning and it's all battery.

For now, I think I'll travel with a Lithium jump starter in the vehicle. That way, I may be of aid to others too. Pay it forward resonates with me.

But the very first hint of unreliability of the battery - I'm replacing it with something that has at least 2x the CCA rating and much better reserve capacity.
06-11-2019 10:18 AM
AvidHiker Heh, another somewhat obnoxious post for the battery guru, but not without merit. Sounds like it's not exactly unusual for those old benz batteries to last 10+ years, but it's also not unusual for them to suddenly quit in their old age. But, of course, nothing is 100% reliable - any battery can crap out on you (even a $300+ AGM, ROFL).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenworks View Post
...What ever method one chooses you need to be self reliant...
An amusing statement coming from a guy who has repeatedly ridiculed those who choose to carry a lithium ion jump pack.
06-11-2019 12:09 AM
jakemccoy I paid around $99 for a Group 24 battery at Walmart. If somebody is complaining about that price for a better car battery, a maintenance item, then that person does not truly believe the OE battery is problematic. That price should be well within the maintenance budget for a $30k car.
06-10-2019 06:54 PM
lfdal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenworks View Post
It's not about tossing money around.
You being from the Great White North should pray that your wife isn't out somewhere when you're 16 year old battery gives up the ghost and she freezes to death.
What ever method one chooses you need to be self reliant and start believing in preventive maintenance.
Read a book sometime
There are places where I travel alone in Maine during the winter where there is no cell phone coverage for extended distances. If my car craps out due to something I can't prevent, so be it. I carry the usual stuff to help preserve life and limb in the bitter cold, at least long enough for someone to potentially locate me. OTOH, if I can spend a few extra dollars to increase my odds of not having a personal extinction event I'm happy enough to toss my money around. This isn't a criticism of anyone else's decision-making process, just my view of the world. In my case, I only needed to hear the OE battery drag twice in the cold to replace it.
06-10-2019 12:47 PM
Ravenworks
Quote:
Originally Posted by AkitaGuy View Post
My wife drives a 2004 Mercedes with the original battery, coming on to 16 yrs, again without issues. My guess is some have lots of money they like to spread around...
It's not about tossing money around.
You being from the Great White North should pray that your wife isn't out somewhere when you're 16 year old battery gives up the ghost and she freezes to death.
What ever method one chooses you need to be self reliant and start believing in preventive maintenance.
Read a book sometime
06-10-2019 12:05 PM
AvidHiker Considering the fact that my stock 490 CCA battery, while it was healthy, could easily start the six cylinder down to around 0°F (and that was just the lowest I was able to try), I didn't concern myself with the difference between 700 and 800 CCA, and went with Group 24 for the highest possible RC. Some have also suggested that the plate sizes and arrangements made possible in the much larger Group 24 format may offer a significant advantage in terms of durability/robustness, assuming they're not cheaping out on the design (not all group 24s or 34s are created equal). That said, either is still a nice upgrade.
06-10-2019 09:07 AM
sbpark
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakemccoy View Post
Just for clarity, Group 24 is bigger and heavier than Group 25 (OE). Group 24 typically has more reserve capacity than Group 34, while Group 34 typically has more CCA.

My apologies. Meant comparing Group 25 to Group 34. I know there's a bit of contention between people between which is the better option between Group 24 and 34. I just went for the higher CCA's since I do spend a lot of time in the mountains in the winter. I'm no car expert, and maybe I'm wrong here, and yes, the 34 has less reserve capacity than the 24, but either way, both the 24 and 34 are a significant improvement over the stock battery.
06-09-2019 10:06 PM
jakemccoy Just for clarity, Group 24 is bigger and heavier than Group 25 (OE). Group 24 typically has more reserve capacity than Group 34, while Group 34 typically has more CCA.
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