Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello, i purchased an 07' Outback back in July of last year. I love the vehicle as far as looks and comfort go. I bought it because i have owned Jeeps for many years, Cherokees, a Wrangler, a Grand Cherokee, all of which have been horrible on gas. So, the issue I am having with the Outback is a minor vibration which i believe is coming from the transmission. It happens while lightly throttling, right before it shifts, for about 2,3 seconds. It doesn't slip or do anything weird, but it certainly is a concern. I am 40 years old, so i do have quite a bit of experience with driving different vehicle, and being in touch with subtle problems that some might not notice. So, with that said, i am hoping maybe some might have experienced the issue i described. I have considered doing a tranny fluid and filter changed. I have failed to mention that the vehicle only has 59,000 miles on it. I bought it with about 57,000 miles. I don't think tranny problems are common on Subarus. Can anyone comment on what i described?

Thanks!!
 

·
I simply cannot abide useless people.
2006 2.5i and 2002 3.0 wagons.
Joined
·
12,306 Posts
Any service history on the vehicle?

That model should have come with Subaru HP ATF, if it got a service with Dex III fluid that can cause some shuddering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Yes, there was a full service history on the vehicle when i purchased it. I'll have to look back and see if the transmission was serviced. I did come across a few posts that mentioned shuddering if using Dextron III. Interesting because other threads say to use it, but maybe it is referring to older models. I certainly am going to consider a full fluid change which seems like it could be somewhat of a pain, requiring multiple changes to get the fluid completely changed. If it fixes the problem it will be worth it.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Your problem sounds similar to what was happening in my 2007. A slight buzz (felt like running over those grooves on the side of the road they put in to warn you that you are departing your lane) for about a second, while under light throttle acceleration. At the same instant the buzzing stopped, the RPM would jump up, the RPM would then climb normally to the next shift. Occurence was random, and I could not intentionally make it happen, so I never took it in to the shop.

I performed three drain and fills per the instructions on this site, using the ATF you can get at the local auto parts store that supposedly meets Subaru specs. That didn't help, but I got some other symptoms (can't remember them at the moment) that made me perform a more elaborate fluid change using the factory Subaru fluid. I changed it all out at once by disconnecting the fluid line at the cooler per instructions on this site.

The good news is, I haven't felt that buzz in some time. The bad news is, it now shifts hard, and the shifts are delayed. By delayed I mean that as the RPM climbs, you anticipate the shift, but it doesn't happen. Just as you think, "Is this thing going to shif...". Bang, it shifts. Its not quite that dramatic, but still very annoying.

Car is currently in the body shop getting parking lot damage repaired, so it won't see a mechanic any time soon, but I am interested to see what ideas others come up with.
 

·
Registered
2007 outback 2.5i
Joined
·
271 Posts
both my automatic subarus have demonstrated similar behavior. more so when cold, i back out of the driveway then shift into drive i get a little vibe and hesitation before it hooks up.

i've pointed it out to the dealership, but they didn't seem to think there was a problem. once the car is warm i don't notice it as much.

about 110,000 miles on mine, and i can't remember when it didn't do it.
 

·
Registered
1993 Legacy LSi with still functioning Air Suspension, 1999 Outback 2.5L 5MT lab Rat
Joined
·
191 Posts
Sounds like a slight Judder from the lock-up torque convertor, the convertors are designed to lock up much earlier in newer cars for economy and such, this is a operating characteristic and can be exascerbated by degraded ATF HP, or use of generic and non-OE fluids. Though Flushing with flush equpment is not recommended, an exchange of fluid thru 2-3 exchanges should correct the issue. Also the Direct drive 4 and 5AT should have an air bleed performed by a qualified service tech after you have changed the fluid. The air bleed/learning procedure can be found online if your confidant in trying to do this yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
SubyTechJoe,

Thanks for the air bleed/re-learn suggestion. I looked online for the procedure, and the one I found required a Subaru Select Monitor (which I don't have) and the one I found for sale online was just under $1,000, so buying one is not an option. Looks like I'll have to take it to the dealer at some point, unless you know of a procedure that doesn't require the monitor.
 

·
I simply cannot abide useless people.
2006 2.5i and 2002 3.0 wagons.
Joined
·
12,306 Posts
You can do several drain and fills with the correct Subaru HP ATF.

Get up to temp.
Park.
Shut off.
Drain.
Replace with fresh.
Drive.
Park.
Manually shift through all gears.
Shut off.
Drain.
Replace with fresh.

3-4 fluid drains will have 90% fresh fluid. Lots cheaper than a dealer flush and can be done in an afternoon, or once a weekend, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,190 Posts
Also the Direct drive 4 and 5AT should have an air bleed performed by a qualified service tech after you have changed the fluid. The air bleed/learning procedure can be found online if your confidant in trying to do this yourself.
I've done annual "drain and fills" and multiple changes (as AWDFTW suggested) and have not had to do the air bleed.

I think there's some uncertainty as to when it has to be done. The FSM is inconsistent; I found it refers to the SSM procedure in the Transmission section, but in the General Maintenance section on changing the ATF, it's not mentioned. I suspect the procedure is necessary when the valve body itself becomes drained. This will happen if the pan is drained and not refilled for a long time, or the valves are activated in that state.

The SSM bleed/learn procedure will automatically cycle the solenoids and valves in the valve body with the engine running, to make sure the valves have refilled properly. The learning part is to get the critical timing of the solenoid changes set up. If this isn't done, there could be some rough shifting when the car is driven, but it will/should subside in a short while as the air is pushed out and the TCM automatically "relearns".

When doing a "drain and fill", after refilling, refill soon after draining, start the engine, and move the gear lever through each position a few times, pausing in each. That will help avoid any related problems.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top