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Discussion Starter #1
I just hit 100k on my 2013 2.5 Limited. So far I have done every service interval that is suggested in the maintenance schedule and I plan on doing the timing belt service by 105k. Any advice on high mileage demons that I should look for?

My car is unfortunately plagued by the oil consumption issue. I have always changed the oil every 6k miles (synthetic) and I typically have to add at least one quart of oil in between changes. Although I have had to add two quarts sine my last oil change which was a little over 5k miles ago. The car does not appear to leak any oil, it just consumes it. Should I lower my interval and start changing it every 5k now that the car is in it's golden years?
 

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2010 2.5 CVT Limited
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You may want to try a different brand of oil. M1 is great, but others are good too. It can make a difference to the oil consumption rate.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You may want to try a different brand of oil. M1 is great, but others are good too. It can make a difference to the oil consumption rate.
Thanks. My car has always been dealer serviced and I have always used the OEM oil they sell.
 

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2011 Outback Limited 2.5i/2018 Crosstrek limited
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I too am close to you on mileage...timing belt being done March 8th...replacing timing and serpentine belt, all idlers and tensioner, and the thermostat.
 

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My 2011 2.5i is at 112k presently. Just got new tires, coolant flushed, rear brakes. Hoping for no HG silliness :S
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I too am close to you on mileage...timing belt being done March 8th...replacing timing and serpentine belt, all idlers and tensioner, and the thermostat.
My dealer mentioned that they typically only do the serpentine belt if it looks to be in need of replacement and tensioner is only needed if it is leaking oil. Seems like I might as well just have those done while they're in there. They did not mention the thermostat though. Not sure how expensive that is but should I also replace it? Only other item I am used to replacing at the same time as the timing belt is the water pump but that seems unnecessary?
 

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My dealer mentioned that they typically only do the serpentine belt if it looks to be in need of replacement and tensioner is only needed if it is leaking oil. Seems like I might as well just have those done while they're in there. They did not mention the thermostat though. Not sure how expensive that is but should I also replace it? Only other item I am used to replacing at the same time as the timing belt is the water pump but that seems unnecessary?
That is my thinking exactly...while they're in there might as well do them all...plus...as noted by others on this forum...the belt usually does not fail...it is one of the other items like the idlers or tensioners that fail and cause the problem. The serpentine belt...just as well...they have to remove it anyways so seeing as ours is seven years old...time to go. As for the thermostat...I am changing that because I don't get a steady temp read from my ultragauge. I have thought that it runs hotter in the winter due to the colder intake temperature...but I have no solid proof on that so I will change it...and if it still runs hotter in the winter then I can say that it is probably because of the colder intake temps...
 

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I thought the 2013 Outback 2.5 had a timing chain.
 

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Short answer:
1. replace the timing belt, pulleys, and tensioner
2. if a proper job isn't tolerable for some reason - then replace the timing belt and the lower cogged pulley.

Long answer:
Are you concerned with a warranty of 12 month/12,000 miles (shop warranty after the repair) or another 100,000 reliable miles?

Replace the belt, tensioner, and pulleys almost as a rule. I will occasionally "inspect" each part individually on a case by case basis. The problem with "inspecting" parts is that the "inspection" is tilted and tainted by the existing timing belt ideas and approach (which at many shops is low grade "belt only") and unlikely to reflect the failure modes and rates of given parts for the next 100,000 miles.

Case in point - at the very minimum one should replace the belt and the lower cogged idler. That is by far the most common pulley to fail and should be replaced every time. If it fails then a $40 pulley causes $2000+ in engine damage via bent valves. If any average consumer knew this I find it hard to believe they would not replace the single highest failure rate item for $40 or less. You can literally google this and see zillions of youtube videos and photos I'm sure of it, because it's very common.

It is true the tensioner, if properly compressed for reuse (a major issue is the compressing/reuse process itself, not just the pulley/miles), then the tensioners are fairly reliable 200,000 miles components. But here again for the cost of a timing belt kit it's just not worth it. I guess you're on the hook for local dealer pricing so that's going to sway your decision and largely the reason they don't do the job right, it's not their fault they just have difficult decisions to make dealing with the public. They don't want to quote $1,000 timing belt prices when the guy down the street charges $300. And in general consumers aren't equipped or digest well when you try to explain to them the differences and realities, they just want it done and they dont' want to pay a ton. I'm not charging any labor, make no money, so the cost is already low but i often get lost/confused looks trying to explain anything technical. So I just try to ask if $XYZ is okay for me to do this right. Dealers have a much harder time communicating that, the differences, and options, and have to make hard judgement calls and mostly one-size-fits-all service approaches on the services they offer based on their current reality. That's not easy.
 

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As to high mileage demons - what is your concern "repairs" or "stranding events"?

The most common is probably struts. Those are always needed at some point. There is no set mileage, but struts are typical high mileage replacement items between 60,000 - 200,000 miles. Depends on local roads, conditions, and personal preference, ie. "was that a bump, did i just feel that bump more than i did yesterday"....or "maybe my head shouldn't hit the roof when i go over bridge abutments?"

The most likely stranding events are the alternator, starter contacts, and fuel pump. I plan on 300,000 miles and like to plan on replacing them with OEM parts around 150-200k. But those are costly and aftermarket parts are inferior so most people just wait until they're stuck and then deal with it.

But it's just an "increasing rate of failure", not a "given". Just to make up numbers complete - by 200,000 miles 30% of people will experience stranding by one of those items. So 70% of people are fine, no issues. But the other 30% have to deal with stranding, towing, etc.

I prefer to mitigate that 30%, but most people do not.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Short answer:
1. replace the timing belt, pulleys, and tensioner
2. if a proper job isn't tolerable for some reason - then replace the timing belt and the lower cogged pulley.

Long answer:
Are you concerned with a warranty of 12 month/12,000 miles (shop warranty after the repair) or another 100,000 reliable miles?

Replace the belt, tensioner, and pulleys almost as a rule. I will occasionally "inspect" each part individually on a case by case basis. The problem with "inspecting" parts is that the "inspection" is tilted and tainted by the existing timing belt ideas and approach (which at many shops is low grade "belt only") and unlikely to reflect the failure modes and rates of given parts for the next 100,000 miles.

Case in point - at the very minimum one should replace the belt and the lower cogged idler. That is by far the most common pulley to fail and should be replaced every time. If it fails then a $40 pulley causes $2000+ in engine damage via bent valves. If any average consumer knew this I find it hard to believe they would not replace the single highest failure rate item for $40 or less. You can literally google this and see zillions of youtube videos and photos I'm sure of it, because it's very common.

It is true the tensioner, if properly compressed for reuse (a major issue is the compressing/reuse process itself, not just the pulley/miles), then the tensioners are fairly reliable 200,000 miles components. But here again for the cost of a timing belt kit it's just not worth it. I guess you're on the hook for local dealer pricing so that's going to sway your decision and largely the reason they don't do the job right, it's not their fault they just have difficult decisions to make dealing with the public. They don't want to quote $1,000 timing belt prices when the guy down the street charges $300. And in general consumers aren't equipped or digest well when you try to explain to them the differences and realities, they just want it done and they dont' want to pay a ton. I'm not charging any labor, make no money, so the cost is already low but i often get lost/confused looks trying to explain anything technical. So I just try to ask if $XYZ is okay for me to do this right. Dealers have a much harder time communicating that, the differences, and options, and have to make hard judgement calls and mostly one-size-fits-all service approaches on the services they offer based on their current reality. That's not easy.

Thanks. I'm mostly concerned with having a reliable car for another 100k miles.

My local dealer seems to be giving reasonable pricing. They quoted me $636 total for the belts and tensioner.
 

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2008 Subaru Outback PZEV,2010 Impreza 2.5i
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Short answer:
1. replace the timing belt, pulleys, and tensioner
2. if a proper job isn't tolerable for some reason - then replace the timing belt and the lower cogged pulley.

Long answer:
Are you concerned with a warranty of 12 month/12,000 miles (shop warranty after the repair) or another 100,000 reliable miles?

Replace the belt, tensioner, and pulleys almost as a rule. I will occasionally "inspect" each part individually on a case by case basis. The problem with "inspecting" parts is that the "inspection" is tilted and tainted by the existing timing belt ideas and approach (which at many shops is low grade "belt only") and unlikely to reflect the failure modes and rates of given parts for the next 100,000 miles.

Case in point - at the very minimum one should replace the belt and the lower cogged idler. That is by far the most common pulley to fail and should be replaced every time. If it fails then a $40 pulley causes $2000+ in engine damage via bent valves. If any average consumer knew this I find it hard to believe they would not replace the single highest failure rate item for $40 or less. You can literally google this and see zillions of youtube videos and photos I'm sure of it, because it's very common.

It is true the tensioner, if properly compressed for reuse (a major issue is the compressing/reuse process itself, not just the pulley/miles), then the tensioners are fairly reliable 200,000 miles components. But here again for the cost of a timing belt kit it's just not worth it. I guess you're on the hook for local dealer pricing so that's going to sway your decision and largely the reason they don't do the job right, it's not their fault they just have difficult decisions to make dealing with the public. They don't want to quote $1,000 timing belt prices when the guy down the street charges $300. And in general consumers aren't equipped or digest well when you try to explain to them the differences and realities, they just want it done and they dont' want to pay a ton. I'm not charging any labor, make no money, so the cost is already low but i often get lost/confused looks trying to explain anything technical. So I just try to ask if $XYZ is okay for me to do this right. Dealers have a much harder time communicating that, the differences, and options, and have to make hard judgement calls and mostly one-size-fits-all service approaches on the services they offer based on their current reality. That's not easy.
OP has 2013 which came with FB25 engine. This engine does not have a timing belt but a chain. I wonder how to maintain components in timing chain in the long term.
 

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OP has 2013 which came with FB25 engine. This engine does not have a timing belt but a chain. I wonder how to maintain components in timing chain in the long term.
OP, priyadar is correct. You have a timing chain, not a timing belt. Much more reliable. A timing chain all but eliminates the risk of engine damage from a failed belt.

As far as preventative maintenance on a timing chain is concerned, in most designs there is none. I don't know that anyone has enough miles on an FB25 yet to see how reliable the timing chain drive is. But on some cars, the timing chain will eventually stretch enough that the engine will no longer idle right. Or metal shavings may be seen in the motor oil. If this happens it is time to replace the timing chain.

Timing chain replacement will typically include a new chain and nylon chain guide or guides. Sometimes the gears will have to be replaced if the timing chain has worn bad enough to damage them.

But there is no reason to do PM on a timing chain. In most cases the timing chain can last the life of the engine.

As far as serpentine belt, I would not recommend replacing it any time before 150k to 180k miles. A couple years ago I replaced the serpentine belt on one of my cars at about 185k miles. While I was glad to have done it, there was no sign at all that the old belt was anywhere near failure.

Regarding your oil consumption, you may consider using Idemitsu 0W-20 in your engine. It has been reported to burn off much slower than most other 0W-20 motor oils. What have you got to lose? It is priced similar to most other leading motor oils, and is available on Amazon Prime.

https://www.amazon.com/Idemitsu-30010092-95300C020-Synthetic-0W-20-Engine/dp/B072KDRZFC/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1519868146&sr=1-1-spons&keywords=idemitsu+0w-20&psc=1
 

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OP has 2013 which came with FB25 engine. This engine does not have a timing belt but a chain. I wonder how to maintain components in timing chain in the long term.
ah right, how confusing. There's no timing chain maintenance necessary. Carry on.

i was replying to this:

My dealer mentioned that they typically only do the serpentine belt if it looks to be in need of replacement and tensioner is only needed if it is leaking oil. Seems like I might as well just have those done while they're in there. They did not mention the thermostat though. Not sure how expensive that is but should I also replace it? Only other item I am used to replacing at the same time as the timing belt is the water pump but that seems unnecessary?
Thermostat isn't a big deal. They're $12 and install is like 2 bolts and a hose/clamp. No big deal. Coolant needs drained/refilled for the process. $50 - $150 depending.

I replied to your timing belt/tensioner remarks above in my last reply.
 

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Thanks. I'm mostly concerned with having a reliable car for another 100k miles.

My local dealer seems to be giving reasonable pricing. They quoted me $636 total for the belts and tensioner.
Add the lower cogged pulley - it is by far the most likely pulley to fail. That should be replaced before the tensioner if you're going to pick and choose parts.

Order of importance based on failure rates....and additionally failure modes:
1. lower cogged idler - these fail the most often and render instantaneous engine damage almost every time.
2. tensioner
3. idlers
 

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2020 Outback Touring XT, in Crystal White Pearl
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I have a little over 190k miles on my 2010 3.6R.

I've done the maintenance basically by the book.

My main "unscheduled" issue was the serpentine belt idler pulley totally failing at somewhere around 140k miles (this was on the second belt) - at that time I ended up replacing both the idler pulley and tensioner/pulley assembly (along with another belt).

I'm not too worried about the timing chain, because in the 3.6 the timing chain isn't one long chain, it's actually three fairly short chains, which will minimize any stretching of the chain(s). I would think the newer 2.5 engines with timing chains would be a similar design, but don't recall seeing a picture.

The weird things that have failed are the power door-lock actuators on the driver side (both front and back) - I have the part for the back door, but just need to get around to replacing it.....

And just recently the little motor that controls the air flow between the front vents and floor vents has started acting intermittently. When it is supposed to be directing air to the floor, it sort of modulates between the floor and the front vents. When it is supposed to be directing air to the front vents (as in either defrost mode, or AC mode), it works just fine.

My objective is just to get over 200k miles, which will happen in five months, or so....
 

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That is an excellent explanation of surbaru timing belt and maintenance by idosubaru. I have three subarus that are 15 to 22 years old. I have lost count of the number of alternators, starters, and fuel pumps that I have replaced on them. I definitely wouldn't wait until 150K miles to replace the alternator and starter on any subaru. Being stranded is no fun. Oh, and by the way, maybe the MAF is another thing to replace as a PM.
 

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OP has 2013 which came with FB25 engine. This engine does not have a timing belt but a chain. I wonder how to maintain components in timing chain in the long term.
Having changed the timing belts on my 1985 GL wagon 1.8 FOUR times (myself at about 2 days per time) in its 243,00 mile lifetime, the chain is why I bought the 2013 instead of the 2012. I'd worry about a dealership that didn't immediately know that.
 
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