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Wondering what everyone sets there stock tire pressure cold, front and back????

crm
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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Look on the driver's door jamb (B-pillar). The placarded pressure values (cold) are authoritative for that particular vehicle (assuming OE tire size and load ratings). Don't forget that tire pressures change approximately 1 psi for each 10 degrees F change in ambient temperature.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was setting them at that pressure, I went to the dealer and they set the tires much higher and front and back the same pressure, wondering if people on here are using different pressures then recommended.

crm
 

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2017 Carbide Gray Metallic Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited, 2014 Venetian Red Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited (sold), 2011 Ruby Red Pearl 3.6R Outback Limited (sold)
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Seems dealers and tire stores always set them at 35. I think the door says 32. 32 is for ride comfort 35 is for good tire wear and fuel efficiency...so Im told.
 

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2017 Outback Limited 2.5, Twilight Blue/Ivory, Eyesight. Also 1995 BMW 525i with 240,000 miles
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Just for ride comfort, I set mine at 31 psi. I have to reset (add air) in the winter when temperatures drop to keep the TPMS from kicking on. I know I ay be sacrificing tire wear. Hey, I want Michelin tires anyway. :)
 

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'18 Outback Touring 3.6R, '11 Legacy 3.6R Limited. '11 WRX not stock
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Came nitrogen filled at 35 psi all four corners. Very comfortable so there it will stay.
 

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Subaru has reason to specify 35 front, 33 rear.
Is not just "comfort".
EVERY Subaru I’ve owned since 2002 has had this 2lb difference between front and rear. It’s for safety according to subaru reps and engineers. It adds additional understeer. In my autox days i’d run 5lbs over front in the rears and you can really feel the handling difference. For rallyx I’d run equal pressures. For everyday driving I follow that placard with an extra pound. So if it says 35f 33r I’d fill them to 36f 34r. With a proper alignment, rotations with balance the tires seem tol last for ever following the posted pressures.
 

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36F and 34R on our 17 OB 2.5
 

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Took delivery of our '18 last week and noticed the tires were reading 42psi on the display. Gauge checked them cold and indeed they were about that. The placard shows 35 for both front and rear. It wasn't riding rough or anything but I lowered them to 38psi for now. Might take them down to 35 after reading this thread.
 

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I'm running 34/32 for the winter, adds just a tiny bit more skid pad area. When the snow/ice is over, I'll switch to 36/34 for better tire life.
 

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I've always wondered what the difference is in operating temperature when a tire is warmed up on the highway. Setting "cold" pressure at a fixed value means a big difference in the amount of air in the tire depending on the ambient "cold" temperature. Those of you who live in northern climes know what I mean: tires set at the recommended cold inflation in the summer will give you a TPMS warning when the temperature goes sub-freezing in winter. A warm-day setting of 32psi can drop to the mid-20s psi when it gets cold outside!

The pressure in a tire is going to rise linearly according to the actual (absolute!) temperature (Boyle's Law and all that), which means that if the difference between the cold and warmed-up temperature is greater in the winter than in the summer, the tire will actually be running on the highway at a higher pressure. Maybe I'm OCD about this and the difference isn't of any concern, but I think about it every time I adjust my tire pressures seasonally.

(I don't currently have a car with a numeric TPMS readout, which would help solve this issue for me.)
 

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Took delivery of our '18 last week and noticed the tires were reading 42psi on the display. Gauge checked them cold and indeed they were about that. The placard shows 35 for both front and rear. It wasn't riding rough or anything but I lowered them to 38psi for now. Might take them down to 35 after reading this thread.
Running them high like that long term will only cause uneven tread wear to the center of the tires. Otherwise you won't feel any ride or handling difference.
 

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I've always wondered what the difference is in operating temperature when a tire is warmed up on the highway. Setting "cold" pressure at a fixed value means a big difference in the amount of air in the tire depending on the ambient "cold" temperature. Those of you who live in northern climes know what I mean: tires set at the recommended cold inflation in the summer will give you a TPMS warning when the temperature goes sub-freezing in winter. A warm-day setting of 32psi can drop to the mid-20s psi when it gets cold outside!

The pressure in a tire is going to rise linearly according to the actual (absolute!) temperature (Boyle's Law and all that), which means that if the difference between the cold and warmed-up temperature is greater in the winter than in the summer, the tire will actually be running on the highway at a higher pressure. Maybe I'm OCD about this and the difference isn't of any concern, but I think about it every time I adjust my tire pressures seasonally.

(I don't currently have a car with a numeric TPMS readout, which would help solve this issue for me.)
I see a 2 - 3 pound increase in the pressure readout after driving for 20 min. So far (on city streets and highways) it hasn't gone above that even after several hours of highway driving.
 

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The pressure in a tire is going to rise linearly according to the actual (absolute!) temperature ...
When you do the math, the temperature rise is very close to 1 psi per 10 degrees F. The placarded (cold) tire pressures take this variation into account. I just set the tire pressures seasonally, adjusted to the typical expected morning-start temperature. If you're really OCD, you can consult National weather Service/NOAA climatological data for your area.

Tire pressure also varies with elevation (or, more properly, with pressure altitude) ... roughly 1/2 psi per 1000 feet. That can usually be ignored in most locales, but you might want to consider it when planning a ski trip or holiday in the mountains.
 
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