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I simply cannot abide useless people.
2006 2.5i and 2002 3.0 wagons.
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12,306 Posts
Lots of extensions.
 

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1997 Outback 2.5
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19 Posts
The only write-up I can find for this is the one for a 2000. Our 95-99s are different in that I guess starting in 2000 Subaru stopped being complete assholes and angled the spark plug holes up a bit.

Are there any write-ups out there that anyone knows of for 95-99???
 

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2005 OBW 2.5L, 1989 Subaru Justy, RIP Blu
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7,355 Posts
Well google. The reason they were "assholes" was purely engineering, as with any double overhead cam engine. Good luck.
 

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98 and 99 Outback
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36 Posts
I did my 99 OB wagon spark plugs. The passenger side is the easier side. I did the driver side first. I removed the airbox and the battery to make more room. But it's still not a fun job to do. I replaced the wires at the same time. I put the spark plug socket in first then a small extension, and then the ratchet. And a ton of patients.

Good luck!

Eddie
 

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1993 Legacy LSi with still functioning Air Suspension, 1999 Outback 2.5L 5MT lab Rat
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191 Posts
1st engineers are given a set of parameters to follow, and serviceability is probably last on the list of required items. The fact is that a spark plug replacement is not that difficult. Patience is key, and a magnetic spark plug socket is worth the extra $. What will amaze most people on this site is that I actually have an easier time doing the rears than the front, even though the front has more frame clearance. Anyone that has negotiated this task in the driveway may tend to side with the dealers that "menu" service and do this with the 60K. The good news is that DOHC Subaru engines have Platinum/Iridium plugs and only require servicing every 60K.
 

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03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
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17,627 Posts
Lots of choices for extensions, maybe a long, thin flat-blade screwdriver to separate the wrenches/extensions. maybe a 'wobble' extension.

Be careful when installing the new plug, don't want to bang the tip closed.

I also like the below for some of the process;


 

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2001 VDC/SC One of a Kind
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14,323 Posts
The plugs are not difficult for someone that deals with them regularly. Try replacing an IACV on an early Y gen F150, that's a chore for tight spots.

Pull the battery and the washer reservoir to help make more room.
 

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03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
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17,627 Posts
^^^ I bet you see a lot of tough spots.

Now, I'd much rather do 100 plugs like the DS rear one on our 03 H6, than ever do another oil filter adapter gasket like on my daughter's 06 Impala again!
 

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'02 Bean H6, AWP & ORP, factory hitch
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3,113 Posts
spark plugs

Lots of choices for extensions, maybe a long, thin flat-blade screwdriver to separate the wrenches/extensions. maybe a 'wobble' extension.

Be careful when installing the new plug, don't want to bang the tip closed.

I also like the below for some of the process;


That's a nifty little tool. Never seen one before, but I will look for one now!
 

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03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
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17,627 Posts
I don't own that exact one, got a set of 3 (1/4, 3/8, 1/2) from amazon for less than $15 i think.

Not needed in every location, but they helped me some on both my Outback and my WRX.

I have older tools so, if you have a newer ratchet with a spin disk on it, probably just as good.

 

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30 Posts
It isn't very hard at all if, like everyone else said, you have some extensions. A wobble can be helpful too. My big tip is spare yourself the time of remove crap to get to them from above. Go from the bottom. There is really nothing in the way. If your a large guy or your claustrophobic, put it on some jack stands. I did all 4 in about a half an hour last Saturday and I had only ever done it once before. When you are reinstalling the spark plugs, try to put a long/short enough extension so that you can reverse thread it lightly first and then thread it regularly with your bare hand. That way you avoid cross threading. This is really important because once the spark plug is in the hole, you aren't gonna see it with your eyes again until the next time you remove it or the engine. So feeling the way it is threading with your hands is the only way to be sure. If you just put it in without making sure its threading correctly and crank it with your ratchet, you could really end up regretting it because it isn't as gentle and you might not feel it cross threading until its too late. Aluminum is relatively soft.
 

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2010 OBW limited 2.5 CVT
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1,602 Posts
Take the valve covers off. The gaskets are probably leaking by the time the plugs need replacing anyway.
 
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