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I'd drive it. The worst thing that could happen is it clunks. No damage done.
 

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Gonna try the tap idea. Set on order from Amazon. Anybody know what size it would be? I just guessed with a set of metric taps from 3-12mm.

But honestly, it’s in there pretty tight. Is there really a big risk in driving it?
Just take the bolt and hut to a hardware or automotive store and get a replacement.
 

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Gonna try the tap idea. Set on order from Amazon. Anybody know what size it would be? I just guessed with a set of metric taps from 3-12mm.

But honestly, it’s in there pretty tight. Is there really a big risk in driving it?
If you try the tap don't force it if you feel any serious resistance. Breaking off a bolt is a pain in the ass. Breaking off a hardened tap is a nightmare. If this is just a nut and a bolt just replace it. If it is a welded in nut as I suspect it might be from the sounds of things it gets a little stickier. Myself I would probably try to clean up the threads with a tap but again, make sure you don't break the tap off in the nut. If that looks like an issue I would probably move on to drilling out the nut or even removing it if possible and putting a new one. That might be easier said than done depending on access.
 

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Installed my 19mm bar today. But I hit a snag. I think I cross threaded the 12mm bolt on the top side of the bracket. The gap is almost all the way closed and it’s tight but I’m afraid to torque it all the way down. Any recommendations? Will it be fine? Or is there a way to take it apart and fix it properly?
From someone who has done that (not from cross threading but from stripping the bolt/nut at the 28ft/lb torque specification), I would suggest a longer M8 x 1.25 x 25 8.8 class flange head high tensile plated bolt & an M8 x 1.25 plated nyloc nut (don’t remove the original nut attached to the clamp bracket). The flanged nut supplied with the flange head bolt can be used, but I prefer a nyloc nut.

I found a normal hex head bolt & washer didn’t work because of the slightly elongated holes in the bushing clamps. After some time the washers distort & squash partly into the elongated holes in the clamp, whereas a flange head bolt spreads the load around the holes & won’t distort.

If the nut on the clamp bracket has been damaged it may need re-tapping, but even after re-tapping I doubt that you would get the required torque without stripping the nut.

Flange head bolt & nyloc nut on bushing clamp (click for full size).

Clamp_flange-head-&-nyloc-nut.JPG

Flange head bolt (click for full size).

M8-flange-head.jpg
 

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From someone who has done that (not from cross threading but from stripping the bolt/nut at the 28ft/lb torque specification), I would suggest a longer M8 x 1.25 x 25 8.8 class flange head high tensile plated bolt & an M8 x 1.25 plated nyloc nut (don’t remove the original nut attached to the clamp bracket). The flanged nut supplied with the flange head bolt can be used, but I prefer a nyloc nut.



View attachment 470586
This is a good suggestion.

I have stripped out all 4 weld nuts on my 2006. Way too much sway bar swapping and rear sway bar bushing product testing on my own cars. I have backing nuts in all 4 bolt locations with longer bolts.
 

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From someone who has done that (not from cross threading but from stripping the bolt/nut at the 28ft/lb torque specification), I would suggest a longer M8 x 1.25 x 25 8.8 class flange head high tensile plated bolt & an M8 x 1.25 plated nyloc nut (don’t remove the original nut attached to the clamp bracket). The flanged nut supplied with the flange head bolt can be used, but I prefer a nyloc nut.

I found a normal hex head bolt & washer didn’t work because of the slightly elongated holes in the bushing clamps. After some time the washers distort & squash partly into the elongated holes in the clamp, whereas a flange head bolt spreads the load around the holes & won’t distort.

If the nut on the clamp bracket has been damaged it may need re-tapping, but even after re-tapping I doubt that you would get the required torque without stripping the nut.

Flange head bolt & nyloc nut on bushing clamp (click for full size).

View attachment 470585

Flange head bolt (click for full size).

View attachment 470586
This is a good suggestion.

I have stripped out all 4 weld nuts on my 2006. Way too much sway bar swapping and rear sway bar bushing product testing on my own cars. I have backing nuts in all 4 bolt locations with longer bolts.
That is a good suggestion, but in the case of the cross-threaded bolt it will still mean getting the bolt through the original nut to complete it. With stripped threads I'm guessing the bolt still went through the nut but wouldn't tighten. Being corss-threaded the bolt isn't going all the way through. In that case it might be necessary to drill the original nut larger to let the new bolt pass through and then tighten the backing nut.
 

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Are larger end links available through Subaru of elsewhere?
 

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I have stripped out all 4 weld nuts on my 2006. Way too much sway bar swapping and rear sway bar bushing product testing on my own cars. I have backing nuts in all 4 bolt locations with longer bolts.
I can imagine the amount of testing on yours. :) After stripping two bolts/nuts I ended up using longer flange head bolts & nyloc nuts on both clamps.

I think the original clamp bolts & welded nuts are fine at the 28ft-lb torque when they are new, but after torqueing to that figure a few times it gets a bit risky. As I mentioned in an earlier post in this topic, I prefer 24 ft-lb which is closer to the 22.1 ft-lbs specified for the identical setup on the SJ Foz XT.

... but in the case of the cross-threaded bolt it will still mean getting the bolt through the original nut to complete it. With stripped threads I'm guessing the bolt still went through the nut but wouldn't tighten. Being corss-threaded the bolt isn't going all the way through. In that case it might be necessary to drill the original nut larger to let the new bolt pass through and then tighten the backing nut.
Yes, on my stripped threads I could still screw the new bolt through the original fixed nut. With a cross threaded nut, the risk of breaking the bolt would be fairly high if continuing to tighten it.

I think your advice in your earlier post about using a tap & drilling is very good, & I think the tap is the way to go. The only concern is JimDavePhil mentioned “Never done a tap. Is it one of those things that is easy with the right tool?”. So without any experience using a tap it can be easy to break one, & as you mentioned they can be a nightmare to get out, especially if they don’t break at the narrow section where they are designed to break (only on some brand of taps).

If drilling the cross threaded nut out with a drill, I would use the flange nut that comes with the 8.8 class flange head bolt. The reason being, that nut would be high tensile whereas I think most nyloc nuts aren’t.

@JimDavePhil, when using the tap, only screw it in clockwise for a small amount until it becomes tight (or as Danver mentioned “if you feel any serious resistance”), then undo it anti-clockwise enough to clear the metal particles. Continue doing this. I always use lubricant on the tap (e.g. grease) to make it easier, but the lubricant needs to be cleaned off before torqueing the bolt (a torque wrench should be used with dry threads (i.e. no lubricant on the threads).

For anyone interested, I have attached a photo below (click to enlarge) of the damaged washers I mentioned in my earlier post where I found it was unsuccessful to use normal hex head bolts & flat washers.

Damaged-flat-washers.JPG
 

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For anyone interested, I have attached a photo below (click to enlarge) of the damaged washers I mentioned in my earlier post where I found it was unsuccessful to use normal hex head bolts & flat washers.

View attachment 470614
Good info about the washers. I haven't done one of these on an Outback so I wouldn't have thought about a possible problem. If I was going in to the job for the first time I likely would have just drilled it out and gone with a grade 8 SAE bolt and washers since I keep bins of just about every size of those at my home shop. To be honest I would probably still try that route over making a trip to town to buy a bolt and nut and I would double up the washer. Wouldn't be any loss in trying it I guess.
 

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I can imagine the amount of testing on yours. :) After stripping two bolts/nuts I ended up using longer flange head bolts & nyloc nuts on both clamps.

I think the original clamp bolts & welded nuts are fine at the 28ft-lb torque when they are new, but after torqueing to that figure a few times it gets a bit risky. As I mentioned in an earlier post in this topic, I prefer 24 ft-lb which is closer to the 22.1 ft-lbs specified for the identical setup on the SJ Foz XT.



Yes, on my stripped threads I could still screw the new bolt through the original fixed nut. With a cross threaded nut, the risk of breaking the bolt would be fairly high if continuing to tighten it.

I think your advice in your earlier post about using a tap & drilling is very good, & I think the tap is the way to go. The only concern is JimDavePhil mentioned “Never done a tap. Is it one of those things that is easy with the right tool?”. So without any experience using a tap it can be easy to break one, & as you mentioned they can be a nightmare to get out, especially if they don’t break at the narrow section where they are designed to break (only on some brand of taps).

If drilling the cross threaded nut out with a drill, I would use the flange nut that comes with the 8.8 class flange head bolt. The reason being, that nut would be high tensile whereas I think most nyloc nuts aren’t.

@JimDavePhil, when using the tap, only screw it in clockwise for a small amount until it becomes tight (or as Danver mentioned “if you feel any serious resistance”), then undo it anti-clockwise enough to clear the metal particles. Continue doing this. I always use lubricant on the tap (e.g. grease) to make it easier, but the lubricant needs to be cleaned off before torqueing the bolt (a torque wrench should be used with dry threads (i.e. no lubricant on the threads).

For anyone interested, I have attached a photo below (click to enlarge) of the damaged washers I mentioned in my earlier post where I found it was unsuccessful to use normal hex head bolts & flat washers.

View attachment 470614
So I just got a tap and dye set delivered from Amazon today. But now ya’ll have me scared to try it. Does running the bolt through the back do the same thing in a less risky way?
 

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Does running the bolt through the back do the same thing in a less risky way?
A tap (or die) cuts new threads and/or cleans up the original threads. A bolt does neither, although it may (or may not) be able to deform the original threads back to usable condition. Restored threads will never be as strong as they were originally.
 

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So I just got a tap and dye set delivered from Amazon today. But now ya’ll have me scared to try it. Does running the bolt through the back do the same thing in a less risky way?
The information that ammcinnis posted summed the answer up pretty well. You could try the original bolt from the back to see if it corrects the cross threading, but don’t be surprised if it doesn’t. Don’t force the bolt too much when trying that in case you break the bolt.

Because a corrected or re-tapped thread will never be as strong as the original thread, I would go with tapping out the damaged nut then fitting a longer bolt & nut as I previously described. The original bolt is 20mm long from memory & is therefore too short to fit a nut correctly behind the fixed nut on the back of the clamp bracket.

Tapping a hole or correcting cross threading isn’t that difficult. Once you know the basics it is just something you get a feel for, similar to how much to tighten a bolt without a torque wrench.

To get the feel for what it is like to use a tap you could practice tapping a hole in a piece of scrap metal if you have any laying around (flat or angle steel - you won’t get the correct experience if tapping brass).

The following Autodrill article describes what to do & watch for when tapping metal:
http://www.drill-hq.com/2012/08/how-to-drill-and-tap-metal/

There is a link in that Autodrill article to a tap & drill chart (which is here: http://www.drill-hq.com/2012/07/tap-drill-chart/ ). The nut on the Subaru clamp bracket is an M8 1.25 pitch, so in that table that is listed in the left column as an 8mm-1.25mm. The closest imperial drill size to drill for that tap is shown as 17/64”. If you don’t have an imperial drill set in 1/64” increments (e.g. 1/32” increments) go to the next size larger drill. But you will only need that information if you are going to practice on a scrap piece of metal.

I found a YouTube video by Ultimate Handyman that shows how to tap a hole in steel, which should give you an idea about what we mean in our earlier posts:


That video shows the three types of taps; Plug (least taper), Intermediate (intermediate taper) & Taper (most taper). For tapping a thread in a new hole; use a taper tap, but for cleaning out a damaged or cross threaded hole, depending how much damage; use a plug tap. If a plug tap won’t start to thread, use an intermediate tap. Plug & intermediate taps have other uses but that is irrelevant to your situation.

If you still don’t feel confident enough after this to re-tap the cross threaded nut, drill it out as Danver suggested. Once drilled out fit the flange head bolt & nut I previously suggested.
 

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This is a really old thread, but it convinced me to upgrade the sway bar on my 2017 3.6R. I went with a 20mm because it was $15 cheaper the 19mm from the Subaru parts website.

The installation was easy. Took about an hour only because I had to run to the hardware store for a 14mm ratchet wrench, which is needed because of the need to insert the Allen wrench through the threaded link connecting bolt.

My first test drive felt more solid in slow corners and more stable and tracked better at highway speeds.

So far so good. Happy I made the upgrade.
 

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I just got done installing mine. I didn’t need to use the Allen wrench. That’s for rust scenarios, right? All my hardware came right off (my car is only a couple months old).

470813
 

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I just got done installing mine. I didn’t need to use the Allen wrench. That’s for rust scenarios, right? All my hardware came right off (my car is only a couple months old).

View attachment 470813
You’re talking about the end links right? The Allen wrench to hold the nut is to prevent the nut from spinning because Allen wrench holds the nut from free spinning. I would stick the Allen wrench in the back and tighten with the socket wrench to make sure it’s installed right and properly.


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You’re talking about the end links right? The Allen wrench to hold the nut is to prevent the nut from spinning because Allen wrench holds the nut from free spinning. I would stick the Allen wrench in the back and tighten with the socket wrench to make sure it’s installed right and properly.


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Interesting. It torqued down tight with a torque wrench.

I went back and read the first post. Said probably not needed on a new car.
 

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I put the 19mm on mine and it was night and day. Now that the bushings are broken in and there's more flex I am curious if the 20mm would have been the better choice? I'm not curious enough to buy the 20mm and compare.. not yet lol

I installed a 20mm and new end links on a friends 16' Forester XT this past weekend. His end links were toast so he went from 16mm and blown links to 20mm with new links. Matched with the XT's tight suspension (compared to the OB) and this Forester can carve corners!
 
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