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Anyway, 1 call to Whiteline them self and POOF, today in the post is a NEW set, a whole new package, not just the 1 bushing.
As a performance retailer myself and 1st a consumer ... I always buy direct from the manufacturer or someplace like RalliSportDirect. There is no nonsense that way.

As an ebay seller. I need to respond within 24 hours to any correspondence or issue. Claims can be opened before 24 hours. WL is a super company an as I would expect. They made you right.

CKE SSP operates in the same way. For this reason, I would never sell my products to a re-seller...
 

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I have recently acquired a 2008 Outback XT, and was wondering if anyone had a recommendation for a shop in the Colorado Springs area to do an alignment after installing the camber bushing kit?

Thanks,
Colorado Boilermaker
 

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I have recently acquired a 2008 Outback XT, and was wondering if anyone had a recommendation for a shop in the Colorado Springs area to do an alignment after installing the camber bushing kit?

Thanks,
Colorado Boilermaker
Honestly, I really like my local Firestone Complete Car Care Center here in North Denver. I have a $175 lifetime alignment on both my cars and my local Technician (Richard) is fantastic. I have adjustable (4) links on both cars also.
 

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My 06 outback xt was ghost walking very bad when I bought it last year. At 12 years old the car only had 50,000 miles on it and brand new tires. So over 35 on snowy roads the rear end would sway all over the road. I read this forum and decided to try several of the fixes. The car got new rear struts. Kyb excel g force for 04 model from Rock auto. They were like 60 bucks a piece. New strut rubbers too. I bought the correct 06 coil springs for them from Subaru they were also 60 a piece. On here it said that the rear 04 struts were the same. They were almost identical but the springs have to be compressed more to assemble due to an almost inch difference. So after putting everything back together the car sat about an inch higher which doesn’t look much different. It rides a bit stiffer and can carry a lot more weight without squatting one bit. I left the mechanic and went to firestone and got a 4 wheel alignment too. The first snow of about 8 inches fell two days ago and there is not one hint of rear sway at all. Complete fix for about 400 bucks total. I do have to say that the original rear struts in the car were bad and maybe the 06 struts would have fixed the issue but no way to tell now. Now the car has 70,000 miles and almost bald tires and it still drove amazing. I can’t wait to put new tires on next week it will go drive even better.
 

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Hi guys just joined and have been reading or hours on this thread. im looking to buy an 05 Outback 2.5XT from a friend. it is a project car. it has 140k and he just smoked 2 turbos so it has lots o metal in the motor and plugged turbo feed screens no doubt . I plan on putting in an 80k motor and turbo etc. anyway my question is I would rather have it lower anyway im not buying it or of road or deep snow. so lowering it 1 to 1.5 in would be great. I would be using it as a daily and to tow jet skis as repairing them is my business. so legacy GT suspension? are all the control arm pickup points the same as the legacys? im ok with I stiffer im more about handling and I will need load capacity in the rear. thanks in advance you guys area wealth of knowledge! any advice?
 

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For better handling and putting and end to ghosting in a 2010 outback 3.6R whith 3 inch lift . I relpaced OEM sway bar with a heavy duty adjustable sway bar. Changed out OEM Links for heavy duty andnew bushings. No problem since.
Also balance load to center in front of rear wheels. Keep at least 50 pounds over rear axel. NO ghosting problem since.
 

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Sooo.... Here's my story/question.

I bought my 2005 2.5i back in November, 2017 as my "winter beater". Only took her out when weather was bad.

270k+ miles, put brand new all-season tires on it the day I drove it home.

Handled snow like a BOSS from first snow onward!

Over the course of 2018, I replaced shocks and struts all around, new HBAs up front, new NAPA CV axles, new front LCAs, and new sway bushings/linkages.

Oh, yeah, got an alignment (Firestone lifetime).

Car was EXCELLENT in the snow, including a New Year's road trip through New Mexico and Arizona and some of the WORST winter driving conditions yet. Plowed through it all like a... Well, a Subaru!

Then, a few weeks ago, I was driving home from work on snow/packed snow. NEVER aggressive, but not grandpa-cautious, either.

First turn into my neighborhood, my back end slid around like a rear-wheel drive pickup with no weight in the bed!

Again, NOT fast, and certainly not any different than the way I drove the Subaru in the snow any other time.

Transmission fluid and front gear case oil were both fine, I did not check rear gear case oil level.

No idiot lights or OBDII codes.

No sudden or unusual sounds or anything that would have alerted me to a problem.

Any ideas why my Subaru would suddenly act like a rear-wheel drive? I had one person tell me this was normal "ghostwalking" from this series, but based on the fact that I *never* experienced this until just a few weeks ago, *and* the fact that the suspension is new all around *and* an alignment just done, I'm not quite buying it...
 

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@sgoti

Did you add an aftermarket sway bar? Or no? I would just toss it up to low traction in the rear. I have had my back end come around, but the XT's have a slight rear bias until things start to slip.
 

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@sgoti All Subaru 4x and AWD have had a slight rear bias from the beginning of time. I have driven Subarus as old as 1975 with On demand 4wd and if you goose the accelerator even slightly on a slick surface while turning a corner while in 4wd/AWD they will do this. I consider this part of the charm and fun of driving a Subaru, you just have to be aware that it can happen.


I don't consider this "ghostwalking".
 

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@sgoti

Did you add an aftermarket sway bar? Or no? I would just toss it up to low traction in the rear. I have had my back end come around, but the XT's have a slight rear bias until things start to slip.
No sway bar, replaced just bushings.

Wouldn't low traction in rear mean *less* push, hence less tendency to fling itself around turns?

Again, with *no* change in my driving habits, I *very suddenly* found myself fighting for control around a turn on a residential street. Literally fine the day before, terrible the next.
 

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All Subaru 4x and AWD have had a slight rear bias from the beginning of time. I have driven Subarus as old as 1975 with On demand 4wd and if you goose the accelerator even slightly on a slick surface while turning a corner while in 4wd/AWD they will do this. I consider this part of the charm and fun of driving a Subaru, you just have to be aware that it can happen.


I don't consider this "ghostwalking".
When I first got the car, I did try to goose it a little during turns. It just kept right on tracking through.

This was a sudden change in the car's handling, literally from one day to the next.

Remember, right after I got the car, I took it all through the neighborhoods first big snow we had.

Starting from dead stop up hills, down hills, on straights, on turns, turns on hills, the car plowed through like it was on rails.

Now, It acts like my old Saturn would when I would intentionally yank the hand brake during a turn.

It NEVER slid, had a bias, or whatever you want to call it until just *very* recently, and *very* suddenly.

SOMETHING changed, and changed all at once. I'm just trying to figure out what...
 

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When I first got the car, I did try to goose it a little during turns. It just kept right on tracking through.

This was a sudden change in the car's handling, literally from one day to the next.

Remember, right after I got the car, I took it all through the neighborhoods first big snow we had.

Starting from dead stop up hills, down hills, on straights, on turns, turns on hills, the car plowed through like it was on rails.

Now, It acts like my old Saturn would when I would intentionally yank the hand brake during a turn.

It NEVER slid, had a bias, or whatever you want to call it until just *very* recently, and *very* suddenly.

SOMETHING changed, and changed all at once. I'm just trying to figure out what...

Temperature...…. What was the outside temperature this time VS then? What was the tire's rubber temperature this time VS then? If you have just all season tires when the outside temp gets under a certain temp the rubber becomes less pliable and does not stick to the slick surface as well. That could be what changed.

I had some firestone tires on a 1999 Forester that were as slick as snot when the temp dipped. I slid right off the street where Evans becomes Iliff and into a rocky ditch. It totaled the car. It was like walking on a staking rink in leather soled shoes.
 

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Let me add one more piece of information that may or may not be important:

I mentioned I put new tires on immediately after I got the car.

I bought a full-size rim and one more new tire and began a five-wheel rotation at my first 5,000 mile rotation.

The tires were rotated at 10,000 miles just before my New-Years' trip (which as I said, I had absolutely NO concerns on).
 

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Temperature...…. What was the outside temperature this time VS then? What was the tire's rubber temperature this time VS then? If you have just all season tires when the outside temp gets under a certain temp the rubber becomes less pliable and does not stick to the slick surface as well. That could be what changed.

I had some firestone tires on a 1999 Forester that were as slick as snot when the temp dipped. I slid right off the street where Evans becomes Iliff and into a rocky ditch. It totaled the car. It was like walking on a staking rink in leather soled shoes.
Mmm...

Don't know for certain the exact temps.

I do know that the temps on my NM/AZ trip *felt* much colder than when I first began slidin' my turns...
 

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Mmm...

Don't know for certain the exact temps.

I do know that the temps on my NM/AZ trip *felt* much colder than when I first began slidin' my turns...
I know there are specs somewhere that will give you an idea of when that temperature loss in traction happens. You will just have to do some research on your particular tire.


What brand and model tire are they, BTW?
 

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Good reading and excellent information.

I will admit that snow tires will handle VASTLY different than all-seasons in snow.

-However-

IF the all-seasons were to blame for the rear end trying to slide around me, why didn't I experience it from the get go, with tires on a vehicle that had crappy suspension, aftermarket drive axles that seem to be suspect for a number of faults, and was last aligned who know when?

IF the all-seasons were to blame, then why did the car literally drive/behave as expected one day and was an entirely different beast the next?

It's almost as if it's giving more power to the rear wheels and less to the front. Honestly, I wondered if the front was getting ANY power, so I popped the fuse in to disable the rear drive and drove to the end of the street and back on the front drive alone. It handled exactly like a front-wheel drive, but with no sliding like I had just experienced.

I did find some NWS data for comparison, and I can't see any significant temperature variations from the winter of 2017/2018 and this year 2018/2019 (or even just this year) that would make me say "A-ha! THAT'S why!"

As for "All Subaru 4x and AWD have had a slight rear bias from the beginning of time", then why didn't I experience the sliding rear in December with a Forrester on all-seasons? (Rental in Virginia, 7 inches of sudden, unexpected snow.)

I grew up driving nothing but front wheel drive vehicles (and none ever had snow tires, btw). As a result, I have developed a healthy respect for winter driving: Anticipate slick conditions, don't drive too fast, don't make any sudden moves, etc. (Ok, I do admit to using the hand brake more than a few times to slide around my corners.) These are the habits I carried over to driving the Subaru. These were the habits I was exercising when the Subaru started acting so suddenly squirrelly.

Maybe... My incredible never-had-any-issues streak *was* the anomaly and This is what normal actually is?
 
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