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2015 Forester XT Touring w/EyeSight
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478 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've read somewhere in the past that the 2005 Outback XT with the 5-speed manual has a constant 50 / 50 power distribution to the AWD.

Assuming that is the case (and please tell me if it isn't) -- is rotating the tires really that important?

If it is -- why?

Do the front or rear sets wear differently?
 

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Lawn ornament XT
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14,366 Posts
It isn't constant. Constant equal torque distribution to 4 wheels would allow Subaru to market the car as 4WD instead of AWD. It would also bring a bit more of an MPG hit.

Also, you can't be guaranteed of equal weight distribution at all times. The front wheels turn for steering, and are subjected to different stress.

Braking from forward motion occurs more frequently than braking from reverse motion, stressing the front tires more.

All of these (and more) contribute to unequal tire wear.
 

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Gallery Ninja, ,
2004 Outback "Bluebaru" & 2005 Outback XT
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5,195 Posts
Same car and transmission. 50/50 split on manuals.

1. Rotate the tires so you get even wear.
2. Tires get worn out in certain ways from cornering and rotating them can help get the most life out of them.

It's worth doing every so often.
 

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Lawn ornament XT
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Same car and transmission. 50/50 split on manuals.
50/50 is believed to be the default starting point for the VTD system. As soon as the car starts moving, the VTD starts modulating that torque split as needed, and from the traces shared in the FreeSSM thread it seems like it is pretty active even without loss of traction.
 

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Gallery Ninja, ,
2004 Outback "Bluebaru" & 2005 Outback XT
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5,195 Posts
50/50 is believed to be the default starting point for the VTD system. As soon as the car starts moving, the VTD starts modulating that torque split as needed, and from the traces shared in the FreeSSM thread it seems like it is pretty active even without loss of traction.
Hey Raster,

From what I understand, the VTD is only available in automatic 5spd Outbacks, not manual like mine and the original poster's. Check it: http://legacygt.com/forums/showthre...nd-vtd-awd-systems-honest-attempt-48112.html?

:)
 

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'08 OBXT MT5
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121 Posts
tire rotation

As stated above, tires wear differently front and rear because of different weight and steering duties. And they have to be the same diameter because the center limited-slip differential is speed-sensitive. It is filled with a viscous polymer liquid which "solidifies" under heat, as when the front tires and rear tires are rotating at different speeds. Stiffening under wheelspin is the intended result, but if you cruise down the road with front tires and rear tires rotating at different speeds, you'll eventually ruin the center diff.
 

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Lawn ornament XT
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Hey Raster,

From what I understand, the VTD is only available in automatic 5spd Outbacks, not manual like mine and the original poster's. Check it: http://legacygt.com/forums/showthre...nd-vtd-awd-systems-honest-attempt-48112.html?

:)
My bad. Somewhere I'd crossed it up that Subaru's name for the viscous coupling was VTD, but after re-reading the link you posted I see my mistake, sorry for adding confusion.

I drove that 5MT for years and then changed cars, got a 5EAT in the new one. Still can't say which I prefer, they are both excellent at different things.
 
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