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2008 OB 2.5 auto trans
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes this is talked to death and I have information overload, with conflicting answers to many questions . . .

Fact . . My OB has no spin-on trans filter. 60k and never been changed according to dealer service records. This dealer does not pull the pan, only unplug and refill.

Questions . . Is there a better / different filter inside the pan as there is no spin-on. I am dropping pan regardless, just need to be prepared. There is no gasket, just silicone to seal?

Are the quarts of Subaru trans fluid from the dealer synthetic. Calling different dealers they say yes and no to going with Amzoil or other syn. oils.

Other questions just need to sort out myself. Have been researching for weeks on all this. Seems you can find info to support whatever you want to believe.

Thanks!
 

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Yes many views, but there's no similar filter inside.

Most ATs (different mfrs) don't have a filter like the spin-on that Subaru added in 1999 and discontinued for MY2008. (The Justy, which was around some years earlier, also had a similar spin-on filter.)

There is a "screen" on the pump pick-up inside the pan (mounted on the valve body), but that's not a fine filter, and usually does not need replacing unless the transmission has had a catastrophic failure. (This too is the same as most other car makers.) (If you do remove the screen/pick-up, I believe there's an o-ring or gasket that also has to be replaced.)

A drain-and-refill, with perhaps one or two repeats, will replace most of the ATF inside. When draining through the drain plug, check in your drain pan and inside the tranny oil pan (at the drain plug opening) for chunks of metal. If there's none (there might be some silvery "slime" on the bottom of the oil pan which isn't unusual) then there's no need to drop the pan. Breaking the factory gasket seal is more likely to lead to resealing problems. (The pan was originally put on with the surfaces clean and dry -- this might be difficult to achieve as ATF will tend to wet the surfaces for some time.)

I believe the pan sealant is "Three-Bond". The usual silicone seal might not work well.

But again, there are many views and you can find whatever answer you prefer.
 

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2008 OB 2.5 auto trans
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks OM. Worked in a GM dealership back in the 60s as the oil change guy for a summer. Pulled lots of pans and saw lots of sludge and gunked up screens, so thats whats stuck in my head.

Had the cork gaskets back then that usually weeped. Always needed to hammer the pan flat again by the bolt holes cause of over torquing by someone.

So...... If I pull my plug . . Insert a wiping device or a magnet, and it comes out clean, am I better served leaving the pan intact? Maybe just pump in some cleaner to flush the inside bottom of the pan?

I did pull the pan on my Isuzu NPR dump truck a few years ago and it was pretty darn clean. Might be better not to poke this dog with a stick either.
 

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Somebody Else's XT
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Yeah be sparing and careful with sealer. You don't want a glob of it to break off and clog that pickup screen.
 

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So...... If I pull my plug . . Insert a wiping device or a magnet, and it comes out clean, am I better served leaving the pan intact?
I'd just stick a finger in and see what I get. It won't be "clean", but as long as there aren't any noticeable pieces, I'd leave it.
 
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