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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello, all. This is my first post here, but I am no stranger to the forum community. I recently opted to change the fluid in both differentials and the CVT in my 2010 Outback (may have been the first time for both at over 180k miles, yikes...). After the job was finished, I decided that I wanted to get magnetic plugs for the transmission drain plug and perhaps also the engine drain plug for the next time I change the fluid in about 6 months (I currently have a Fumoto drain valve installed on the engine oil pan, but would rather have the security of a magnetic plug over the convenience of a drain valve). I believe the stock specs of both the engine and tranny drain plugs are m16x1.5x12 (can anyone confirm?). I can't find a 12mm within a reasonable price, but found a 15mm for over $10 cheaper per bolt, and it appears to be better quality. Will the extra 3mm in length pose an issue in either engine or transmission drain plug applications? I can't imagine that they would, but I'd rather be safe than sorry. Thanks!
 

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Incorrect as for the 2010 CVT (which is the same as the 2012 CVT I have). I can't speak to the later generation CVT (2013 onwards).

The 2010 CVT drain/fill plugs are bigger than the engine oil drain plug.

The 2010 CVT drain/fill plugs are M18x1.5x12 - you can see my results with replacement plugs here: https://www.subaruoutback.org/threads/drain-fill-plug-magnets-results-from-3-500-miles-in-the-cvt.295337/

If I were to pick again I'd go with Gold Plug vs the Dimple plugs I have now, as Gold Plug is also very high quality, also has temperature resistant neodymium magnets, and is significantly cheaper. My oil drain plug is Gold Plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Incorrect as for the 2010 CVT (which is the same as the 2012 CVT I have). I can't speak to the later generation CVT (2013 onwards).

The 2010 CVT drain/fill plugs are bigger than the engine oil drain plug.

The 2010 CVT drain/fill plugs are M18x1.5x12 - you can see my results with replacement plugs here: https://www.subaruoutback.org/threads/drain-fill-plug-magnets-results-from-3-500-miles-in-the-cvt.295337/

If I were to pick again I'd go with Gold Plug vs the Dimple plugs I have now, as Gold Plug is also very high quality, also has temperature resistant neodymium magnets, and is significantly cheaper. My oil drain plug is Gold Plug.
Thanks for the correction! I saw your post in my scavenger hunt for plug specs lol. It was very informative/helpful, but the link no longer works. I was still able to find the correct plugs by visiting Dimple's website, but their plug seems a bit expensive. What's your experience with the MOTO-D plugs, if you have any? They seem cleaner and are cheaper. I'd prefer to not have to spend $30+ on a plug if I can avoid it. If there is, however, a considerable and distinguishable difference in quality, I wouldn't mind spending the extra $10-ish on the higher quality or better performing part. I'll definitely check out Gold Plug, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Your vehicle already has a magnet located on the bottom of the CVT pan. You can clean it by removing the pan. Also, replace the CVT filter while you are in there.
Good to know. I was hoping to avoid dropping the pan so I could avoid the guaranteed cleanup that I would need to do after, and adding a magnetic bolt seems like easy insurance for the future that I can maintain without the mess and effort of dropping the pan every time. As for the filter, I have heard mixed messages on that topic. Many encourage the replacement of the filter during fluid changes, but many also state that doing that is unnecessary and cite that the filters last competently for the lifetime of the transmission barring any major failures. Which one closer aligns to the lineartronic? I also recently changed the fluid on my fiance's 2012 Altima, which, fortunately, was the only vehicle of its respective model generation to have a drain plug on the bottom of the pan (face-palm). I'm glad too, since the previous years required a pan drop to drain the proper amount of fluid out, and I would prefer to avoid that if I can. It's no big deal, though, but pulling a plug is much easier than worrying about gaskets, potentially getting debris in the pan once it's taken off, torquing a dozen bolts to the same spec, etc. Not to mention that I would certainly make a huge mess that I would be much happier not cleaning up.
 

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Regarding existing magnet: As you can see in the other thread with pictures the neodymium magnets still suck out a significant amount of ferrous particles so in my humble opinion it's still worth doing even if the pan magnet is there. It also gives you an opportunity to get the debris OUT of your system every time you do a drain and fill. Keep in mind this first gen CVT also has issues where the torque converter sheds metal wear.

I have no experience with MOTO-D plugs. The question I'd have is whether it's not just neodymium, but high-temp neodymium. You don't want a standard neodymium magnet as they lose strength at hotter temperatures. The last thing you want to do is accumulate a ball of ferrous particles and then have it all burst to give your valve body a "heart attack" :)

Gold Plugs fit that criteria and they're $18.99
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Regarding existing magnet: As you can see in the other thread with pictures the neodymium magnets still suck out a significant amount of ferrous particles so in my humble opinion it's still worth doing even if the pan magnet is there. It also gives you an opportunity to get the debris OUT of your system every time you do a drain and fill. Keep in mind this first gen CVT also has issues where the torque converter sheds metal wear.

I have no experience with MOTO-D plugs. The question I'd have is whether it's not just neodymium, but high-temp neodymium. You don't want a standard neodymium magnet as they lose strength at hotter temperatures. The last thing you want to do is accumulate a ball of ferrous particles and then have it all burst to give your valve body a "heart attack" :)

Gold Plugs fit that criteria and they're $18.99
$18.99 is certainly cheaper than MOTO-D's ~$23 so I'll definitely look and see if any are in stock. Thanks for the help!
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Regarding existing magnet: As you can see in the other thread with pictures the neodymium magnets still suck out a significant amount of ferrous particles so in my humble opinion it's still worth doing even if the pan magnet is there. It also gives you an opportunity to get the debris OUT of your system every time you do a drain and fill. Keep in mind this first gen CVT also has issues where the torque converter sheds metal wear.

I have no experience with MOTO-D plugs. The question I'd have is whether it's not just neodymium, but high-temp neodymium. You don't want a standard neodymium magnet as they lose strength at hotter temperatures. The last thing you want to do is accumulate a ball of ferrous particles and then have it all burst to give your valve body a "heart attack" :)

Gold Plugs fit that criteria and they're $18.99
What specific part numbers of Gold Plug would I be looking for for the engine and transmission respectively? I looked on their website, and they don't appear to have information available on the bolt specs (unless I'm blind). When I plugged my vehicle info into the site, it suggested the AP-02 (edit: it's AP-07). I'm going to assume that's the engine oil drain plug, but I'd prefer to ground my purchases in a little more than just "assumption." ;)
 

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This sounds like a solution looking for a problem.
Beware that many automakers have a magnet PERMANENTLY installed in the lubrication-pans. There is no reason to add another magnet on the drain-plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
This sounds like a solution looking for a problem.
Beware that many automakers have a magnet PERMANENTLY installed in the lubrication-pans. There is no reason to add another magnet on the drain-plug.
You think so? There's no way to clean that magnet without dropping the pan, which I'm not interested in. And as OBDad remarked earlier, they seem to grab a significant amount of particulate accumulation between fluid changes. Seems like a worthwhile investment to me. Just my 2 cents, though.
 

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AP-05 for the CVT drain/fill. Just select Subaru --> Outback --> 2010 --> CVT Drain on their site. You can double check with them directly. I thought AP-07 was for the oil but can't recall.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
AP-05 for the CVT drain/fill. Just select Subaru --> Outback --> 2010 --> CVT Drain on their site. You can double check with them directly. I thought AP-07 was for the oil but can't recall.
You are correct. It is AP-07. I am on mobile, so the site is a bit confusing to navigate. It looks like I don't have the option to delineate between engine/transmission drain plug on mobile, or not easily at least. Thanks!
 
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