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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After searching this topic I found you can easily disable the DRLs by clipping the center pin on the DRL relay. I did this and got the following results

DRLs disabled when low beams are on.
DRLs still come on with parking lights on and in gear.
High beams now don’t work at all.

Looking for any advice. Thanks in advance.
 

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2006 Subaru Outback Wagon 2.5L XT Limited
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. This is the thread I used. No mention of it also disabling the high beams.

Coming from Volkswagen, I’ve found that nothing is really easy on this Subaru in comparison.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So replace the relay and unplug the resister? Where is it located?

Any thoughts on the high beams not working? It’s weird they come on (in DRL mode) when parking lights are on, but nothing when I trigger high beams.
 

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So replace the relay and unplug the resister? Where is it located?

Any thoughts on the high beams not working? It’s weird they come on (in DRL mode) when parking lights are on, but nothing when I trigger high beams.
Maybe cut the wrong contact on the relay? That would kill the high beam but let the DRL still work normally.

Here is the post with the DRL resistor... How to disable DRL on 2010 Outback
 

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2011 Outback Limited 2.5i/2018 Crosstrek limited
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You cut the pin that fires the high beam. DRLs are high beam at low voltage. You did not cut the current flow but rather the pin that carries the current. Oops! 😲
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I cut the middle pin. Does the low voltage current come from a different pin? Because the DRLs work with the parking lights on. I'll take a pic of my relay when I get home.
 

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Later in that thread Iinked above are some other pics... some people buy a replacement relay that is SPST

496773


another way is to unlatch the pin in the socket and pull it away so the pole in the SPDT existing relay just doesn’t connect to anything.

496774


unplugging the DRL resistor would do it for sure if the relay modification isn’t working for some reason
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you all for taking the time to reach out. Much appreciated.
I realized after pulling my relay, that I had removed the wrong tab. I had cut the single tab in the center, not the center tab in that row of 3. New relay and removing the right tab and everything works fine.
 

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This will sound critical but it is just a question - why would you disable this feature? Again my point of reference is Canada where they have been law for 30 years. It is weird to drive in the US (which before COVID I did a lot) and see cars without lights on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I disabled it because I like running the parking lights in the daytime. More like euro city lights on my VW.
 

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This will sound critical but it is just a question - why would you disable this feature? Again my point of reference is Canada where they have been law for 30 years. It is weird to drive in the US (which before COVID I did a lot) and see cars without lights on.
That's a reasonable question to ask.

In answer, here are some specific reasons...

The practical reason is that I'm an amateur astronomer and go to dark sites with other astronomers often. More often than not I don't stay the entire night, which means arriving or leaving while it's still dark out - often both. It's very annoying, and sometimes literally painful, when bright white lights are used around people whose eyes have become dark adapted, and these can also ruin a photographic image which can represent a significant investment in effort and time. This is becoming a losing battle with the ever-increasing proliferation of lights, often surprisingly bright when turned on in dark places, that are designed with no way to turn them off in modern cars. I don't want to be "that guy" if I can avoid it with only a moderate amount of effort, which killing the (non-required) DRLs accomplishes in spades.

There are also, serious, IMO, safety issues with DRLs as they are currently implemented. "What!!!!", you might ask? "Safety issues??? They're there because they're a safety feature!" The problem is that in many (most? all?) new cars, the instrument lights are always on when the ignition is on, even during the day (why???), and the DRLs provide some forward lighting, but the tail lights are not on. All too often I will see a car on a street or highway with its tail lights off as the driver struggles to see what's ahead because he hasn't noticed that his headlights aren't on. This is not a safe situation. If the dashboard lights were also off when the other running lights were off, that might be a clue for at least some of these clueless drivers, but for whatever reasons, this is no longer done. In the US, the NHTSA has steadfastly declined to require DRLs for decades now because of a lack of hard evidence that they actually improve safety. They are not shy about mandating requirements they deem likely to improve safety, often in spite of an outcry against them, which strongly suggests that the evidence is simply not there.

A more philosophical reason is because I still cling to the apparently quaint notion that the driver should be in charge of the vehicle and actually engaged in its safe operation. As the driver, it's my responsibility for lights to be on when they should be on, and I should have the ability turn them off when they don't need to be on. If someone thinks it's safer to drive with headlights on during the day (sometimes it is), then turn them on! The trend is to automate every system that's possible to automate, and as a result drivers routinely become more and more lackadaisical, which often results in more complex systems (that are subject to failure, especially as they age) and no or little net gain because "if you try to make your system more foolproof the universe will provide a bigger fool."
 

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So, did you figure this out?
 

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