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I do my own maintenance since I trust myself vs the dealer. Has anyone noticed the spark plug placement on the new twin can 2.5 engines. Wow, it reminds me of my old Hemi, to one that you had to pull the engine to change plugs. You the life of me I can't figure on how you would get a socket in there. They are within a few inches of the frame on both sides. I hope they are still not 60K change. That's 20 months for my wife.
 

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2017 2.5 Touring
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I think a 3/8" drive with a universal joint on it will get in there.
Otherwise, just replace the head with new plugs in it.
 

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2013 Outback Limited 2.5 EyeSight & 2010 Legacy Premium, 2010 OB Limited (traded)
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The plugs on the 2010-2012 EF were slightly above the frame making removal easier. The 2013 with the new FB places the plugs down alongside the frame. Still looks like there is plenty of room for removal. And to answer your question, Subaru still does spec the change interval at 60K. Hard to believe that my Lexus with the same plugs had a change interval of 120K and they looked like new when I changed them at 120k.
 

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Click and Clack make an interesting point on this. They suggest not waiting til 100k to change the plugs on any car since most have aluminum heads, and waiting that long can allow the plugs to almost fuse to the head, making removal an interesting day, with galled threads and cross threading. They suggest even removing them and putting the old ones back in with anti seize paste is a good idea at around 60k.
 

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2013 Outback 3.6L Limited with EyeSight
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60K replacement will keep most consumers happy with better performance and MPG.

In the end, maintenance never costs you as it pays for itself.
 

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2012 limited, white, no moonroof or nav
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Click and Clack make an interesting point on this. They suggest not waiting til 100k to change the plugs on any car since most have aluminum heads, and waiting that long can allow the plugs to almost fuse to the head, making removal an interesting day, with galled threads and cross threading. They suggest even removing them and putting the old ones back in with anti seize paste is a good idea at around 60k.
Yup. Steel plug threads in aluminum heads tends to make a permabond, by 100k miles. A 60k replacement for iridium plugs may not get all the life out of the plugs, but it does make it a better bet for avoiding damage when they are removed.
 

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I learned the rubber hose trick in auto shop class when I was a kid. You need a nice big extension on your plug socket. Loosen the plugs up until they are free. If the plug socket can't hold onto the plug, push in a piece of rubber tubing so it presses over the end of the plug... and remove. When putting the new plug in, use the rubber tube to insert the plug, and get the threads started... this way you don't have to worry about "hosing" your plugs - ba dum dum.
 
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