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2013 Subaru Outback Premium 2.5i All-Weather+Moonroof Venetian Red Pearl W/ Ivory Coth
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Discussion Starter #1
I had a general question. We are used to conventional transmissions so what im going to describe may just be a CVT quirk. When we back our 2013 Outback out of the driveway and then step on the brake to shift into drive the car does not move for a split second but then it goes. We are used to the idle RPM's being sufficient to move the car forward a little before we push the gas. Is this common for the computer program that runs the CVT? Hopefully I am describing this in as much of detail for someone to understand
 

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2013 OB 2.5 LTD with Nav & Sunroof Pkg's
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I might be misunderstanding you but I've not experienced what you're describing above. This is my first CVT as well.
 

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2013 Subaru Outback Premium 2.5i All-Weather+Moonroof Venetian Red Pearl W/ Ivory Coth
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Discussion Starter #3
I found the article regarding the 2012 Impreza's CVT tranny. Maybe the same thing I am experiencing. I can definitely live with it; I just wanted to know if it was "normal"
2012 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Limited: Review notes - Autoweek

Article talks of forward to reverse and reverse to forward hesitation. In addition to this issue many talk of lack of power delivery or torque delivery in reverse for those doing rock crawling with their Outbacks (not something I plan to do)
 

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2010 Outback 2.5i
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I have a 2010 OB and it can take up to 2 seconds before the CVT completely shifts from R to D (and I assume from D to R or any other combo).

I bet it is 'normal'. I'm surprised that the shift speed hasn't improved with the 2nd-gen CVT.



I had a general question. We are used to conventional transmissions so what im going to describe may just be a CVT quirk. When we back our 2013 Outback out of the driveway and then step on the brake to shift into drive the car does not move for a split second but then it goes. We are used to the idle RPM's being sufficient to move the car forward a little before we push the gas. Is this common for the computer program that runs the CVT? Hopefully I am describing this in as much of detail for someone to understand
 

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2013 Subaru Outback Premium 2.5i All-Weather+Moonroof Venetian Red Pearl W/ Ivory Coth
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571 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
My wife notices it more than I do. Our CVT works great, but if you are used to a conventional shifter transmission there are some differences, i.e. it really does not like driving around in parking lots at sub 10-15 mph. It has kinda a "clownish" feel at those lower speeds. The backing to forward thing is just another one. Not a big deal for a transmission that can feasibly "shift" into hundreds of gear combos within a driving cycle. People slammed BMW's iDrive early on, but CVT's are not going away so we must deal with them
 

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2013 OB 2.5 LTD with Nav & Sunroof Pkg's
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Just noticed you're talking about the 2012 CVT. I have a 2013 and the CVT's are different I believe so that might be why I'm not experiencing this?
 

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2013 Subaru Outback Premium 2.5i All-Weather+Moonroof Venetian Red Pearl W/ Ivory Coth
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Discussion Starter #8
I have a 2013 2.5i Premium
 

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2013 Subaru Outback Premium 2.5i All-Weather+Moonroof Venetian Red Pearl W/ Ivory Coth
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Discussion Starter #9
The article I posted was related to a 2012 Imprezza CVT
 

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2019 2.5i Touring (Wilderness Green)
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I've seen this hesitation in both a 2012 Impreza loaner car I've driven, and my 2013 OB.

The thing to keep in mind is that reverse/forward is handled by a system at the output from the transmission. It takes some time to make this change, especially if there is still load going across the transmission. I believe the torque converter has to be unlocked before the switch happens as well, so there is a bit more going on than in a standard transmission.

Now, I've seen this hesitation more if I go into drive while I'm still rolling back a bit. If I'm stopped when I change the gear, it is a lot less noticeable. But even then, I've seen the time it taks before it begins to roll forward on its own.
 

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I have a 2013 2.5i Premium
I've noticed the same in my (same) car. I spoke to the dealer and was told this is normal for the car/CVT. Can't say I love the short delay but I've gotten used to it so it doesn't really bother me anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks all
 

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2013 Outback 2.5 Touring CVT
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Same here. I was told by the dealer that it is because of the 'fly by wire' system (if I believe that explanation - rolls eyes).

I actually do believe the comments on waiting until the load on the transmision is low and the parts stop so it can change gears. I'd also believe this was done due to wear/damage seen during tests.

My biggest concern about this is during a 3-point turn on a road. You have to keep it in mind if you are doing it in a hurry, or you risk getting hit from oncoming traffic.

We have to live with it, but I do miss my MT for something like this.

As an aside, if anyone has ever done a cursory glance on the underside of your vehicle, you can see a 'typical' Subaru feature: they place rubber boots very near exhaust components. In this case (and aside from the drive axle boot), notice the transmission linkage boot at the side of the transmission that goes to the shifter - it is within inches of the catalytic converter.

I plan on installing a metal shield (somehow) between the two. I'd really like to put stainless (0.025" SS shim stock, but hard to find and $$$), but may settle on galvanized (step flashing) or brass (model shop) for now. Same for a few other places.

My 2003 had the grease literally boiling out of the passenger side front CV joint boot when the shields around the catalytic coverter failed.
 

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Does anyone know the details of what happens inside the CVT when you shift from R to D and vice versa? I'm thinking the sound I (and others) occasionally hear/feel is the reverse gears are not fully engaging and some slippage occurs. Something sticking? Solenoid involved? Hydraulic pressure issue?
 

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2013 Outback 2.5 Touring CVT
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I have to do a little more testing, but here is something I noticed just out of the blue:

When you have the traction control turned OFF, I thought it seemed like the shifting into reverse went quicker. I will try again this weekend more thoroughly
 

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2004 Toyota Sienna, miss my eyesight. Life moves on.
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I have to do a little more testing, but here is something I noticed just out of the blue:

When you have the traction control turned OFF, I thought it seemed like the shifting into reverse went quicker. I will try again this weekend more thoroughly
Some advice as I've been there done that. You're over stressing and over thinking your new car. Just drive it for awhile. If something is wrong it will show up a lot more easily to detect before your bumper to bumper warranty is up. :roadtrip:
 

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I just ready a review of the 2013 Outback in Consumer Reports. One of their comments was regarding the delay in shifting to Drive or Reverse with the CVT. Must be a characteristic of the CVT.
 

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That's not good. Anything that could be considered a safety issue or considered to be in any way, dangerous to drive, should be corrected.

The three-point turn in the road where another vehicle may come upon you sooner than you planned is just one of many scenarios where this could play out to be an actual danger to the driver and occupants!

Whenever the dealer decides to keep the vehicle for warranty work and give you a loaner, it is typically an affirmative to the question "do you consider this to be causing or resulting in some kind of danger to your driving?" Anytime I have ever said YES, they kept my vehicle until it was repaired!

I had a transmission that would start out in second gear, then shift down to first after starting from a stop. I told them, if I were about to cross RR tracks, the delay this causes could result in my getting hit by an oncoming train! Or, I could get hit in an intersection because I couldn't get out of the intersection in time!

They installed an entirely-new transmission in the vehicle as it was still on warranty. The new trans solved the issue.
 
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