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2013 Outback 2.5 CVT
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I relax my size 10 foot I am soon at full throttle. The dealer claims there is no adjustment available. The resistance seems to be set for a 100 pound lesbian or something. Has anyone modified their pedal or that slippery plastic carpet protector, next to the pedal, to make their Outback accelerator more man foot friendly?
 

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2012 Subaru Outback 2.5i Limited
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961 Posts
Don't worry...if you buy 2.5, then there isn't much chance of rear ending someone even at full throttle! :D
 

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22,806 Posts
My 505 T was light regarding gas pedal resistance the Subarus not so much in comparison.
Sounds like something 70yr old dad might say after driving Suburban's for the past 30yrs.
 

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2014 2.5i Limited
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950 Posts
First car with an DBW throttle maybe?
 

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2004 Toyota Sienna, miss my eyesight. Life moves on.
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982 Posts
Actually the 2013 2.5 is night and day different. If you bounce the pedal like a normal car you're gone and fast believe it or not. It takes a soft foot. I'm either used to it or the ECU adjusted but you have to hit the 2010-2012 twice as hard for the same reaction.

I recently took my sisters 2011 out to make sure all was well before she passed 36k and I had to give it a lot more gas. Half throttle to full doesn't really feel any different though. Its all the lower torque thats night and day different.
 

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2004 Toyota Sienna, miss my eyesight. Life moves on.
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982 Posts

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2012 Subaru Outback 2.5i Limited
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961 Posts
Thats not what really matters and those number justify why half throttle and more don't feel any different. Between a better lower end and a revised transmission it feels different down low.
Are the CVT ratios different? I know that the reverse ratio on 2013 is more robust...but how about the forward ratios?
 

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2004 Toyota Sienna, miss my eyesight. Life moves on.
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982 Posts
Are the CVT ratios different? I know that the reverse ratio on 2013 is more robust...but how about the forward ratios?
Well when you take off in a 10-12 it feels like there is a torque converter slipping a clutch so to speak before the CVT is fully engaged. On the new car it feels like a manual transmission already in first gear with a low ratio. There really isn't much "slip" so to speak, its just ready to go. So not knowing whats really going on thats how I describe it.

Ratios aren't much different as crusing at 65 is around 1800-1900 rpm. Once rolling around town though you can definately feel the greater torque and CVT programming changes as it just simply takes less RPM to get around. If you have a fat foot and push it everywhere then the RPMs spike just like before, you think its gutless, and buy a 3.6!
 

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2013 Legacy Lim CVT Car: 2011 OB Prem 6MT Car: 2006 Miata GT 6MT mc: 2003 Honda GL1800A * Reunite Gondwanaland *
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3,565 Posts
The resistance seems to be set for a 100 pound lesbian or something.
Yep, it's way too light for a 420 pound eunuch.

...you shoulda bought German,

Looby
 

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2019 2.5i Touring (Wilderness Green)
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376 Posts
Ratios aren't much different as crusing at 65 is around 1800-1900 rpm. Once rolling around town though you can definately feel the greater torque and CVT programming changes as it just simply takes less RPM to get around. If you have a fat foot and push it everywhere then the RPMs spike just like before, you think its gutless, and buy a 3.6!
Interestingly...
2013: [email protected], 174-lb/[email protected]<O:p</O:p
2010-2012: [email protected], 170-lb/[email protected]<O:p</O:p
Are the CVT ratios different? I know that the reverse ratio on 2013 is more robust...but how about the forward ratios?
So, I agree with foxrider that the 2013 has a fair amount more pick up and go than the 2012s. But it doesn't seem to be the engine and ratios that makes the biggest difference when I'm driving. Yes, the engine has a little more power, and the CVT range has been tweaked so that it has a bit more grunt off the line (and higher RPMs at the other end). But the biggest change is really the throttle programming. The 2013 CVT, like the Impreza 2012s CVT is more willing to downshift to get acceleration from pedal input. It takes less pressure on the pedal for it to downshift and rev up a thousand RPM or three.

Combine the programming with other smaller changes, and it adds up to a fairly noticeable difference in how the car feels when you want some power. The throttle response in the 2012 2.5 does feel anemic compared to the 2013 2.5.
 

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2013 Outback 2.5 CVT
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hopefully there will be a fix in the future. I have my best results when driving barefoot. I have to finesse the pedal when either taking off from a start or from coasting. The slightest amount of throttle causes the car to lurch forward causing passengers heads to whip back. I can never make a smooth transition. While at the dealer the guy ahead of me was having his 2013 6 cylinder Outback looked at for the same thing.
Looby stop looking at my package and offer useful advice if at all possible.
 

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2019 2.5i Touring (Wilderness Green)
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Hopefully there will be a fix in the future. I have my best results when driving barefoot. I have to finesse the pedal when either taking off from a start or from coasting. The slightest amount of throttle causes the car to lurch forward causing passengers heads to whip back. I can never make a smooth transition. While at the dealer the guy ahead of me was having his 2013 6 cylinder Outback looked at for the same thing.
Looby stop looking at my package and offer useful advice if at all possible.
Unfortunately, without taking it into the dealer and seeing if there is an adjustment, there isn't much more we can offer.

The pedal does require a fairly light touch for light acceleration, and this is not a new phenomenon with Subaru. It is also compounded by the second Gen CVT which doesn't respond the same way an automatic would with the throttle. The first gen CVT in the earlier gen 4s behave a lot more like an automatic.
 

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2013 Outback 2.5 Premium 6mt
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187 Posts
While I don't have my new Subaru yet, I didn't notice an overly light gas pedal in the 2013 I test drove.

It might depend on which brand of car you owned previous to your Subaru. Certain GM vehicles seem to be very stiff and very slow to respond while some cars like the Ford Crown Vics are extremely sensitive and have an extremely light tension.

It could also be a possibility that Subaru reprogrammed the drive by wire to give a sense of a more powerful engine. Example: 5% throttle pedal may actually give the engine 8% power. It could also be that Subaru changed the throttle pedal to one with a lighter tension for whatever reason.

Edited to Add: The 2013 I test drove had the 6mt. I did not overly rev the engine during the test drive like I would if the pedal was that extremely light. Maybe Outbacks with the CVT have different gas pedals and/or programming to make the CVT seem more responsive.
 

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2012 Outback 2.5i Premium 6MT Built: 01/12, 2014 Forester CVT Limited
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71 Posts
If you live by the sea, spray some salty water on the pedal spring and hinge, should stiffen everything up.
 

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I have a 2015 Tribeca which, of course, has the 6-cylinder engine. I also have a 2006 Baja, and I've owned three other Subarus. The Tribeca is the only one that wants to jump off the starting block with the slightest pressure on the accelerator. With heavy shoes I can barely detect the pedal. Surely someone has come up with a solution for this problem other than driving barefoot???
 
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