Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 20 of 57 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So - my 2013 2.5 CVT was at the dealership yesterday for a Tow Hitch install and they loaned me a loaded 3.6R Limited and one HUGE difference between the 3.6R and my 2.5 is the brake feel. Since buying mine I've felt the brake pedal to be pretty soft, but compared to the 3.6R it's night & day.

Anyone else feel the brakes in their 2.5 CVT are kinda soft?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
How many miles do you have on yours versus the loaner?

I noticed the same thing with mine versus a loaner, although mine had 200 light miles, while the loaner had over 5000 miles. Both were 2.5s. A new car has new rotors and brake pads which have not been bed-in. Depending on how you drive, it can take some time before the brakes have "bite" when lightly using the brake.

Mine has improved since then, although slowly. I agree with nipper that you should ask the dealer. They already have the car, and there can't be any harm in having them check.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
I know someone that used to work in the auto industry. He said the biggest headache area is brake bleeding. I don't know if things have improved since he work the assembly line but it sounded like a lot of special attention and reworks were needed at the brake bleeding station.

I second (or third) the idea of having the dealer take a look at your car since it is already there. It may just be that the brakes need to bed in but it may also be air trapped in a brake component somewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Car isn't at the dealer anymore, just broke 600 miles - so brakes should be bedded in enough by now. Maybe I'll bleed the brakes myself this weekend while I have a friend around to help, then see if that helps any. If not and the dealer says it's not an issue - then I guess there will be some brake upgrades in my future - Braided lines to start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
546 Posts
Car isn't at the dealer anymore, just broke 600 miles - so brakes should be bedded in enough by now. Maybe I'll bleed the brakes myself this weekend while I have a friend around to help, then see if that helps any. If not and the dealer says it's not an issue - then I guess there will be some brake upgrades in my future - Braided lines to start.
Probably a waste of time. Since the 3.6 does not use braided lines, what makes you think that installing them will make much difference? Sounds like it just needs a good bleeding. I don't know of any car that has braided lines from the factory yet there are plenty with excellent brake feel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,355 Posts
It is your brakes. They are slightly important. Make a trip to the dealer point out what you found and show them side by side. It may be that car had an issue. It may be yours has an issue. It is under warrenty, have them look at it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
brake bleeding can be done at home pretty easily. grab a vacuum bleeder (aka mityvac or equivalent) or a large irrigation syringe (reverse bleeding) and have at it. Brake fluid is cheap as well. Beats having to go out of your way to a dealer and waiting around for them to get to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
We tested identical with all but engine 2013s. I kept brakes in mind because I thought I'd read the 6 cyl had larger rotors. To be honest the differences that stood out were audible and the front of the car acting heavier in some cornering and then the obvious which was 6 did have more power to accelerate. Both of these cars had less than 20 miles on the odo, so nothing extreme was done while testing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,322 Posts
Audible in what regard?<O:p</O:p
<O:p</O:p
Brake feel (spongy) is a function of the master cyl, ABS and BFD systems. Unless OP is actually referring to braking/stopping performance, pad bedding has no bearing.
It depends… my Honda has a firm pedal/feel with rubber hoses, it has the same feel before/after bleeding. The OB does feel spongy, but performs as-should/reliably.<O:p</O:p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
brake bleeding can be done at home pretty easily. grab a vacuum bleeder (aka mityvac or equivalent) or a large irrigation syringe (reverse bleeding) and have at it. Brake fluid is cheap as well. Beats having to go out of your way to a dealer and waiting around for them to get to it.
Exactly - which is why I will tackle this myself this weekend, but will do it the old fashioned way with the enlistment of a friend to press the pedal while I play with the nipples! (Why does Brake Bleeding sound so perverted?) :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I'd actually say that the stopping performance of my 2.5 is below that of the loaner 3.6 that I drove on Monday. But if the 3.6 does have larger disks as someone suggested - that might be why. If there's nothing that can be done after bleeding and verifying correct brake function - I'd seriously consider a 3.6 brake swap if it were possible to do. I'm assuming the caliper mounts etc. would likely be the same - so hopefully that would simply mean swapping in the 3.6 Calipers & Disks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
I feel soft brake padel as well. At least, it is softer than my corolla. But I get used to it after few hundred miles of driving. Now, I feel my corolla brake padel way too hard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,289 Posts
I'd actually say that the stopping performance of my 2.5 is below that of the loaner 3.6 that I drove on Monday. But if the 3.6 does have larger disks as someone suggested - that might be why. If there's nothing that can be done after bleeding and verifying correct brake function - I'd seriously consider a 3.6 brake swap if it were possible to do. I'm assuming the caliper mounts etc. would likely be the same - so hopefully that would simply mean swapping in the 3.6 Calipers & Disks.
FWIW, I recall seeing somewhere published the 3.6 does have shorter braking distance than the 2.5 (60-0 mph distance).....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,142 Posts
FWIW the 3.6R has bigger rotors and pads. I believe the calipers are the same. They most likely have the same stopping distance due to the increased weight of the 3.6R.

This however should not result in a spongy pedal feel on either car. I would have your dealer check it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
She's going to the dealership tomorrow after a bit of a near miss and having to stomp on the brake pedal over the weekend. Just turned 1000 miles, so brakes should definitely be broken in sufficiently by now.

Will update once they have checked everything over. Hoping they can bleed em and firm up the brake pedal at least, as 2" of more of slop before the brakes kick in is just not what I feel should be normal!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Went on a test run with the Service Manager, he tested the parking brake and did several emergency stops to activate the ABS etc. Said that the 2013's do have a different braking system over the 2012's - based on the speed of the vehicle etc. He said it's also a good idea to activate the parking brake every time the vehicle is stopped, so the system cycles etc.

Verdict however is that nothing is wrong and that the crappy spongy feel to the brakes is just a 'feature' of the 2013 and the 2012 3.6R I drove last week with the Firm brake pedal doesn't have this annoying 'feature'!

Sure takes some getting used to tho! :(
 
1 - 20 of 57 Posts
About this Discussion
56 Replies
30 Participants
psulick3
Subaru Outback Forums
Welcome to the Subaru Outback Owners Forum, we have tons of information about your Subaru Outback, from a Subaru Outback Wiki to customer reviews.
Full Forum Listing
Top