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2015 Outback Premium 2.5 engine
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I don't yet own a Subaru Outback, but have been looking at one for the last week. As in the title, it's a 2015 Premium, 2.5 engine. I have spent several days searching about purchasing a high mileage car (this being my first Subaru) and too many of the threads had to do with different models and problems not applicable (like head gaskets which appears to no longer be a problem as in the past)

When I was a kid NO ONE had a car with 100,000 miles on it! (of course most rusted out by then also) so 91,000 seems really high. BUT If I didn't see that on the odometer I would have no idea at all because the car drives like new. It had one owner (a company) where it was driven on trips (how else put that much mileage in so short a time?) The little dealer has the service record of ALL maintenance done to the vehicle and it appears everything was done on schedule.

From prices I've seen, getting a car with only 50,000 or so miles would be about $6,000 or more than this one, and then I might not know anything about its previous service and care.

I realize to some extend buying any used car is a crap-shoot, but I need help in overcoming my issue of buying a high mileage used vehicle!!

One half of my brain is saying GET IT. IT'S 10 YEARS NEWER THAN WHAT YOU HAVE NOW and one half is saying "your current Honda element has 92,000 and runs fine so why bother??"

Words of wisdom?
 

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'15 Outback 2.5i Premium
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Sometimes time has more to do with the decrepitude of a car than sheer miles. Most of my recent cars had 160,000 to 225,000 miles on the odometer when I gave them up, but were suffering more from age-related problems than mileage-related ones at the end. The plastic parts in modern cars degrade over time, and after 15 or so years, things just start to break, even if they're not often used.
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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When I was a kid NO ONE had a car with 100,000 miles on it!
...
Words of wisdom?
100,000 miles isn't the death sentence it used to be. Around our house, we call any vehicle with less than 100,000 miles on it "the new car." Our 2016 Outback replaced a lowly 1998 Dodge Caravan with 296,000 miles on the odometer (original engine and transmission!), and it was only retired two years ago because some guy in a pickup truck ran a stop sign and T-boned it.

That said, I wouldn't consider buying any vehicle that has more than 50,000 miles on it without first paying for a detailed pre-purchase inspection by a mechanic I trust.
 

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Unlike many other vehicles, longevity of the 5th gen OB is yet to be proven. If you don't mind being the guinea pig then go for it. I know it is not something I would buy.
 

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What is most critical on any used car is how well the car was maintained and driven both mechanically and cosmetically. 91k for a 2015 I'd guess would be mostly highway miles which is SO MUCH easier on an engine, drivetrain, and suspension vs shorter stop start trips on secondary roads. If the price is right and there is some proof the car was well maintained with proper oil changes, etc, I wouldn't hesitate to buy if that's what your budget can afford. 91k highway is barely broken in for a Soob!
The higher miles wills scare many uneducated buyers away so good chance price negotiation can be in your favor. How much are they asking?
 

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2016 2.5i Outback, 2002 Audi S4 Avant, 1980 CB750F Supersport, 1985 Carrera 3.2
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I'm about at that rate of mileage on our 2016 with 67k - no problems and drives as good as new. I tend to worry more about old cars with low mileage (which is the case with my other two cars, a 1986 and 2001 with 100k-ish on them). So long as items like spark plugs, drive belts, alignment, brakes bled, transmission flush, routine oil changes and other maintenance are being done accordingly, then I wouldn't have a problem if the price is right. Usually the loudest voices on forums tend to be the minority regarding problems they have; most of us do not share the same experiences. Just take a look at things like suspension bushings, struts, motor and transmission mounts for leaks (if fluid filled) or dry rotting, as well as the motor for any kind of leaks. But in my experience doing maintenance, typically higher mileage young cars do not wear like old cars with the same mileage because their age tends to dry rot those items like an old tire. You should be able to get good mileage on those items before you need to worry about them.
 

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I have a 2016 with 76,000 miles that I bought new. To me it's still a new car. In the past I didn't even look at vehicles with less than 100k. I wouldn't worry about it.

BTW, you might want to hold off. I'm guessing with the new acsent coming out you may find some deals on Outbacks.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

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Those high miles wouldn't bother me in the least if you have the detailed service history to check and it followed Subarus schedule or better. Easiest miles that or any car could ever see, and a ton of life left for you to enjoy reasonably trouble free.

Those miles give that car limited appeal so you should get it at a reasonably "cheap" price. If you're in the right area, your Element could bring top dollar as they are desirable.

It's all about your comfort level though.
 

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First....How heavily are YOU going to use it.
Seclond..... There's no saying that you can't sell it if you make the wrong decision.
 

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If you have it inspected and look at the CarFax report, you can probably be pretty safe buying a car like this. Two weeks ago I bought a 2015 Outback Premium with 103,000 miles on it. I knew I wanted a 2015 model (Generation 5) or newer, and I was willing to take a newer car with higher miles (likely highway cruising) versus an older unit with lower miles. Mine was a fleet car that was very well maintained (I could see all the regular maintenance was done on the CarFax report) and the interior is immaculate. I am VERY thrilled to have it, and my Subaru shop found zero problems with the car. I have a high level of confidence in Subaru based on my previous experience (a 2003 Impreza WRX). And remember that while you will read about a lot of problems on a forum like this because people are searching for solutions and venting frustrations, these are probably less common than the thousands of trouble-free Subies that are out on the roads every day. Best of luck with your search; just trust your gut and do your research.
 
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