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2016 Outback Ltd 3.6
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14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Going to add notes here so that maybe someday they will help someone - Feel free to comment and ask questions. Will be a bit in the making. With that said... topic one: Read doors


Thankfully, the rear doors were pretty easy to take apart. 2 screws (one hidden behind interior door pull, and one in the arm rest). Then there were 7 or 8 of the white plastic pop-rivets. The door pull itself is secured to the interior panel by 2 screws. The window control is a single harness connection. The speaker is mounted to the door frame. Special note on the plastic pop-rivets - the aftermarket ones all appear to be a tiny bit too small. Replacing the little foam gasket on the originals was more than sufficient.


After carefully removing the interior panel, I detached the speaker lead and removed the speaker. (I'm not impressed with it...) I then carefully cut away the vapor barrier.

HUGE WARNING: the black tar/adhesive is the worst stuff on the planet. I should not have tried to remove it. It was a waste of time, made a bigger mess, and it turns out that new vapor barriers don't come with it.

On a related note, the vapor barriers cost between 13-18 dollars each from the dealer. (also, those little white square retaining inserts are $4 each... don't loose them. That is the SQUARE insert - one behind the door pull, 2 behind the armrest, and 3 on the speaker frame.

There is some sort of door pull connector that routes through the vapor barrier too. I had to disconnect that when doing the new vapor barrier.

I put as much of the sound deadener on the interior of the outside shell as reasonably possible. B-quiet ultimate. (Unable to post link at the moment) - Huge note - there is some sort of oil on the bottom 20% of the interior of the door that makes adhesives NOT work. I assume this is a rust prevention measure.

I also did the exterior of the inside frame, and then some of the inside frame. I added 1/4 adhesive-backed neoprene wherever seemed appropriate, and then a 1 inch thick acoustic foam directly behind the speaker location. I also used the neoprene around the existing hole.

I had to do some adjustment to the crutchfield mounting bracket, as none of the holes lined up quite right. (It indicated it may have been for a Toyota - which I find to be a theme in this upgrade).


I'm opting to install new speaker wire. Because of pricing/size, I went for the 10 awg. I carefully pierced the molded conduit with a phillips screwdriver, then ran the wire along the existing path. Lots of zip ties, then neoprene where I thought it might chaff. I wrapped the old speaker connector in foam and electrical tape so it would not rattle around.



After putting the replacement vapor barrier on, I gave it some extra support with aluminum HVAC tape. I used fast-rings for the speakers, as well as trimmed back-baffles to help protect the speakers from falling water in the windows.

For the actual speakers, I chose a pair of digital designs 6.5 AW (still a noob - can't post links :(

Attaching picks shortly
 

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Registered
2016 Outback Ltd 3.6
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14 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Fuel tank and line suprises

So after lifting the back seat, I was quite surprised to find the PLASTIC fuel lines. Never seen a vehicle like this, and it's honestly a little scary.

Most of the lines are covered with a hard (but still flexible) plastic shell that's attached to the carpet. (Looks like heavy nylon). The routing was done very well, and I suppose the up side is that it won't get snagged under the car.

Always, I did find one thing that set off my alarm; on the passenger side near the rear door, the "fuel door" cable was chaffing across the fuel line. I don't like that even a little. I went ahead and wrapped the fuel door release cable with Teflon where it touches. I'm going to ask the dealer/service people about this next time I'm in. (Thinking of adding the hitch and I don't know if I want to do that one myself)
 

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