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I own a 2017 Outback 2.5i Premium with Eyesight and CVT, which I have driven about 11000 miles so far. It is generally an excellent car but the brake pedal is only slightly higher than the height of the gas pedal, and consequently it is possible to hit both the brake pedal AND the gas pedal simultaneously. This could be very dangerous in an emergency situation (e.g., a child runs out in front of the car), as the car surges forward just when you are trying for maximum braking, thus extending the stopping distance of the car. Other cars (I have owned VWs, Saabs, and Volvos) have the brake pedal significantly higher than the gas pedal, making this situation impossible. I have asked the dealer service manager about this and was told that the brake pedal height is not adjustable, and so I should ask Subaru Customer Retail Services (the USA HQ). Subaru Customer Retail Services has not yet provided a fix. I have also reported this problem to the NHTSA, hoping NHTSA will require Subaru to fix this dangerous problem. In the meantime, does anyone have a simple fix? I wonder if a simple shim - perhaps 0.75" to 1.0" on top of the brake pedal? - would work temporarily, while we wait for Subaru to provide a more permanent fix?
 

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2018 Outback Limited 2.5i with eyesight & nav.
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you could ask about 'adaptive' equipment. (ETA: not adaptive, it's actually MOBILITY) There is a variety of equipment made for drivers who are disabled in various ways. I would think a safe alternative brake pedal that comes up higher than normal would be available.


ETA: http://www.subaru.com/owners/subaru-mobility-assist.html You would not qualify to get it under the program, but they might sell it to you. I don't know the details, but you can call them and find out if they will sell.
 

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The car already has a fix for this. The ECU is looking out for simultaneous brake & gas pedal application. If it sees both for more than just the briefest moment, throttle input is ignored and the vehicle idles for a few seconds.

This was a result of the 2011 Toyota unintended acceleration lawsuits. Many carmakers have implemented similar technology in their cars.

With that out of the way, it's easy to modify your car for comfort. I'm certain you can find a pedal block that makes the car more to your liking.
 

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2015 3.6 Premium
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I have never had a problem with this in my OB. I have however nearly put a Kia Carnival through the back fence of the police station I work at. The combo of pedal height and police boots make it a trap for unwary players. Luckily I only (steal) this bucket of puss on the odd occasion to do an errand.
 

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2005 OBW 2.5i, 2010 MB R350 Diesel, 1991 Toyota MR2 | suspension & braking enthusiast
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661 Posts
Hi GBWendell. It sounds like you won't be satisfied until Subaru of America does something for you.

But if you're truly concerned about the safety and/or comfort aspect here, would you consider purchasing a 3rd-party add-on pedal extension product? If you would be so kind as to take photos of your pedal cluster and take measurements of the pedal, I can design a product to clip on top of the pedal.

If you're at all concerned about this approach, do search the interwebs for "pedal caps" or "pedal extensions". Many OEM manufacturers have steel pedals that are covered by a removable rubberized pedal cap that wears out over time. Rather than replacing the expensive pedal cluster, its simple to just clip on a new pedal cap.

Some sports models tend to raise the gas pedal up to be in-line with the brake pedal to enable "heel-toe" technique. For example the 2001 Audi TT used the same pedal cluster as the Volkswagen Golf, but had pedal caps to raise the gas pedal about 1cm closer to the driver so it was more inline with the brake to promote the sportiness aspect. This is most common on three-pedal setups with clutch. Drivers outside of North America tend to prefer the pedals at the same distance (see 1980's Audi 5000 "unintended acceleration" scandal.)
 

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2017 Outback 3.6 Touring, which replaced '05 Outback XT
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The cars I've driven a lot are Toyota (1975, 1977, 1989, 2015), Ford (1996), and Subaru (2005, 2017), and all had the brake pedal fairly close to the same height. Recently, I rented a GMC pickup to do some hauling. The brake pedal was noticeably higher. It felt very awkward and inefficient to lift my leg to get my foot on it. I adapted to it, but I didn't like it.
 
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