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2017 2.5i Premium Lapis Blue
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Yes, "When the vehicle is used under severe conditions ...." Refer to Note 6 in the excerpt from the FSM posted above by jakemccoy.
At least you could save a couple of bucks by reusing the brake fluid. :unsure:
 

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2016 OB 3.6R, White with tan interior
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FWIW: Our car is a 2016 3.6R. Over two years ago, I found that the battery hold-down clamp was corroding. I took it off, cleaned and primed, then painted. It corroded again so I took it to the dealer just before the 3 yr warranty expired. They decided that the battery was leaking, and I got a new Subaru battery and clamp. So far no more corroding. I do use the little felt 'washers' under the battery posts and keep the battery clean.

(So that's good, but I am starting to have the no start issue even though I keep the car on a Battery Tender. Back to dealer as I don't know if the car has had the charging parameters changed. But that's another thread)
 

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2016 2.5i Limited, 2013 Tesla Model S 85
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This is a common failure of lead acid batteries. Likely one cell of that battery failed then with continued use and charging to get back to 13.8V minus one cell overcharged the others. Finally failed to start when the overcharging damaged the other cells sufficiently. Outgassing, boiling, corrosion on the items closest. Need to check the underside of the hood as it is likely to be corroded.

Oh, and the battery "water" is to be checked every 3-6 months. With that much corrosion I doubt this occurred.
 

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You might also try some of this under the hood on whole engine compartment with a high pressure spray at a car wash.
Been doing this for 40+ years on all my vehicles with no issues. I learned it from an Aircraft mechanic who spayed down a IO 540 Lycoming 6 CYL Engine - let it soak for about 5 minutes and then sprayed down everything under the cowling with a water hose and pressure adapter. A clean engine compartment also helps with early detection of potential mechanical issues such as oil or coolant leaks in cars.
[Lycoming= Air cooled aircraft engines] Depending on driving conditions where you live will affect how often you do this. I do this about 2 times a year. Use the Gunk Degreaser every other time.[once a year]

15 Oz Engine Brite® Engine Degreaser Non-Chlorinated
 

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2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
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The maintenance schedule published by Subaru provides primary guidance .....
Looking at the items that are both listed in the "Severe" category and also are marked "Perform" in the chart - suspension, brakes, power steering - it appears that this category more than anything else was the product of a roomful of attorneys deciding how to best avoid liability on warranty claims, personal injury, and deaths.
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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7,259 Posts
... suspension, brakes, power steering - it appears that this category more than anything else was the product of a roomful of attorneys ...
Your car, your choice. But expect Subaru to look closely at any major warranty claim that could have been mitigated or avoided altogether by following their published maintenance schedule.
 

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Your car, your choice. But expect Subaru to look closely at any major warranty claim that could have been mitigated or avoided altogether by following their published maintenance schedule.
Do you strictly follow the maintenance schedule?
 

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2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
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But expect Subaru to look closely at any major warranty claim that could have been mitigated or avoided altogether by following their published maintenance schedule.
Yea, I know.

And I have no issue with denial of claim based on the situation where there is significant deviation from this basic published maintenance schedule.

What I do take issue with is the use of the loosey-goosey term "severe service" in Note 6 in order to weasel out of a genuine claim.
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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Do you strictly follow the maintenance schedule?
Not "strictly." I do use it for general guidance, and the deviations I make are defensible from an engineering standpoint. If something breaks due to my not reasonably following the schedule, though, I'm prepared to pay the consequences.

What I do take issue with is the use of the loosey-goosey term "severe service" in Note 6 in order to weasel out of a genuine claim.
I generally agree. Preemptively replacing fuel and brake lines every 6 months simply because the streets are salted in winter seems pretty extreme, placing an undue burden on owners.
 
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I generally agree. Preemptively replacing fuel and brake lines every 6 months simply because the streets are salted in winter seems pretty extreme, placing an undue burden on owners.
Not to mention the replacement of brake pads and rotors, parking brake, and axle joints and boots every six months.

Or replacing the power steering system and suspension every six months if you drive in extreme cold or do repeat trailer towing.

My guess the intent with all of those was to increase the inspections of those items to every 6 months/6000 miles rather than replace and that the proofreaders read the manual about as carefully as most owners do. :ROFLMAO:
 

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2018 OB 2.5 Ltd, No Eyesight, No Navigation
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If you are always driving like Brucey, 6 months on brakes is too long. I mean, it is an individual thing, and it is the “severe conditions” category. I consider Subaru to be a real SUV brand. They are ball parking the severe conditions, but it does not really matter. Anybody who is aware they operate in “severe conditions” probably services their own car and already has a good feel for when parts need to be inspected and replaced.

By the way, I am already out of warranty and don’t have an extended warranty. Spending the extra dough on “severe conditions” servicing seems like a good investment.
 

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Not "strictly." I do use it for general guidance, and the deviations I make are defensible from an engineering standpoint. If something breaks due to my not reasonably following the schedule, though, I'm prepared to pay the consequences.


I generally agree. Preemptively replacing fuel and brake lines every 6 months simply because the streets are salted in winter seems pretty extreme, placing an undue burden on owners.
My guess is that it's a poor translation from Japanese ways of phrasing things. I think they mean replace the SCHEDULE interval with 6 months for inspection, rather than replace the brake lines every 6 months.
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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I think they mean replace the SCHEDULE interval with 6 months for inspection, rather than replace the brake lines every 6 months.
That would make more sense.
 
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2017 Outback Touring
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I can appreciate this discussion, it points out differences in opinions about EXPECTATIONS of service from OB's.

I gotta tell you ppl, these are NOT lifetime vehicles, they were not intended to be. If you think of these vehicles as rock crawlers, drift machines, off-road rally vehicles, snow plows, river rangers, desert marauders, etc., you are fooling yourselves. They are grocery getters, dog to the groomer, weekend camping, build a house, utility haulers.

Sure, you CAN play hard with 'em, but at what price? Yes, it's sad in a way that Subaru didn't put a decent sized battery, stainless everything, top quality moving parts all over these units. If they had, it would be a BMW, MB, Range Rover, Volvo, priced well above what Subaru offers for under $40k.

I can honestly say these new OB's are a far cry from the '76 model wagon I started with decades ago. Appreciate the value, use 'em up, have fun, then move on. I assure you you don't see these at car shows or high end auctions as collector cars.

FWIW, I solved my battery issue preemptively by replacing the original 356 CCA group 25 with another group 25, 550 CCA from Costco. $80, and another $16 for a new positive terminal. This is a '17 with 80K miles, and the positive terminal was horribly corroded. One of the easiest battery replacements I ever performed(Costco doesn't do the labor!)

20210111_133306.jpg 20210111_145813.jpg
 

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Sure, you CAN play hard with 'em, but at what price? Yes, it's sad in a way that Subaru didn't put a decent sized battery, stainless everything, top quality moving parts all over these units. If they had, it would be a BMW, MB, Range Rover, Volvo, priced well above what Subaru offers for under $40k.
In addition to higher quality parts, the maintenance cost for those cars is about three times more. My folks have owned over 10 luxury cars, and I have taken notes on how much they spend on maintenance. They pay more all the way around (initial purchase and maintenance), and the depreciation is greater as well. The more expensive parts on luxury cars do not necessarily last longer. They are just nicer or higher performing within the time period.
 

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My guess is that it's a poor translation from Japanese ways of phrasing things. I think they mean replace the SCHEDULE interval with 6 months for inspection, rather than replace the brake lines every 6 months.
Yeah it seems like a typo that should have been "I"inspect instead of "R" replace on the maintenance checklist.

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