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Discussion Starter #1
$3000 down. $149 a month for 3 years. The Premium is about $260 with the same money down. Still a good deal, but how much money is SOA throwing at the base model deal? Throw in the turn-in charge and I'd still be under $9000 to drive a 2018 Outback for three years. I'm looking at a tenth of that amount just to put tires, a battery, and an oil change in my '11 - which blue books at 9K trade in.

I just can't wrap my head around this. I give them my 2011 and they give me a brand new Outback and a $6000 check (9K minus $3000 down) and for the next 3 years I send them $149. That's $5364 in monthly payments.

But I'd take that $6000 check and knock a few months off my mortgage. The $149 a month wouldn't be a burden. I saved that much switching cell phone providers.

It's a 10K mile lease but I'd look into a 12k. I drive *exactly* 12K a year without even trying. All other lease configurations the extra mileage adds about $8 a month. Hope this one would too.

Anyone have a base model and wish every day they'd have spent another $100 every month to get all that Premium equipment? I can talk myself out of nearly every one those options - heck I used to ride a motorcycle to work daily. Anything with doors and heat is an upgrade.

Before the "life advice" folks chime in - I should clarify - I'm not destitute. I'm just cheap.

But am I missing something here?
 

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Nothing wrong with being cheap. My wife and I have spent our lives living below our means. Seen what happens to so many that live beyond theirs.

If you will be content with the base model for 3 years then go for it. Would suggest you also factor in gap insurance into your lease.
 

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2013 BRZ 2005 OBXT
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If you are able to stay under the mileage cap and don't mind the fact that you never have any value in a car (lets be real even if you own a car they are not a good investment) then leasing is a great deal. When I was younger I used to bash leasing. Now that I am getting older and not enjoying wrenching on cars as much as I did in the past leasing is a very attractive thing.
 

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2018 Outback 2.5i Premium
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You'll be totally fine with the base model unless you love or "need" fancy stuff. I've had a base model Forester and Honda Civic and they got me where I needed to go quite well.

Assuming you have no debt on credit cards or anything, throwing the extra $6,000 at your mortgage may not be the best idea because in three years you're going to have to come up with a down payment for another lease. Save the $6,000 in a separate account and you've got two more down payments to cover you through January 2027 -- $3,000 down in 2021, then $3,000 down again in 2024, BUT then you'll have to come up with some new money for 2027. :)
 

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2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee, 2011 WRX, 2015 Legacy 3.6r loaded and a 2016 Camaro 2SS.
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Nothing wrong with being cheap. My wife and I have spent our lives living below our means. Seen what happens to so many that live beyond theirs.

If you will be content with the base model for 3 years then go for it. Would suggest you also factor in gap insurance into your lease.
All leases have Gap insurance built into them by default.
 

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2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee, 2011 WRX, 2015 Legacy 3.6r loaded and a 2016 Camaro 2SS.
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I am going to lease a Touring 18 3.6r for 15k miles and year and the residual is 60% at lease end. That is crazy high, but helps drive down the cost of the lease!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Assuming you have no debt on credit cards or anything, throwing the extra $6,000 at your mortgage may not be the best idea because in three years you're going to have to come up with a down payment for another lease.

In 2 years I won't have a mortgage. (even less if I throw 6K at it) That will free up half of my household income. Coming up with some cash after that shouldn't be problem.

This is, of course, if everything goes as planned. I know things don't always. But that's a constant.

I'd like the 6 cylinder for towing. I tow with the H4 now and it does a really admirable job, it's just slow. I understand the H6 transmission is beefier. On a lease car none of that matters. Not that I would abuse a lease car, but it's ability to go 200K miles is not my concern.

With my self-imposed crazy mortgage payment, an H6 is out of the question. My '11 would need to last another 3 years until I could pay cash (or at least 50% down) on a new car. I love my heated seats. But leather feels a lot colder than cloth. Eyesight is cool, but I'm an attentive driver and don't touch my phone while driving. I think the non-tinted windows look dorky, but for $60 in materials I can fix that. (and remove it before lease turn-in)
 

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2017 Outback 3.6R Limited
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As Mike Tyson said, "Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth."
 

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$3000 down. $149 a month for 3 years. The Premium is about $260 with the same money down. Still a good deal, but how much money is SOA throwing at the base model deal? Throw in the turn-in charge and I'd still be under $9000 to drive a 2018 Outback for three years. I'm looking at a tenth of that amount just to put tires, a battery, and an oil change in my '11 - which blue books at 9K trade in.

I just can't wrap my head around this. I give them my 2011 and they give me a brand new Outback and a $6000 check (9K minus $3000 down) and for the next 3 years I send them $149. That's $5364 in monthly payments.

But I'd take that $6000 check and knock a few months off my mortgage. The $149 a month wouldn't be a burden. I saved that much switching cell phone providers.

It's a 10K mile lease but I'd look into a 12k. I drive *exactly* 12K a year without even trying. All other lease configurations the extra mileage adds about $8 a month. Hope this one would too.

Anyone have a base model and wish every day they'd have spent another $100 every month to get all that Premium equipment? I can talk myself out of nearly every one those options - heck I used to ride a motorcycle to work daily. Anything with doors and heat is an upgrade.

Before the "life advice" folks chime in - I should clarify - I'm not destitute. I'm just cheap.

But am I missing something here?
If you are above all cheap, forget brand loyalty, be flexible, and look for manufacture subventioned leases from better reputation brands that are down on their luck in sales, and in need of moving product. In recent memory, in the Dallas area, there have been some great deals in this way from Acura and Infiniti. In mass market brands, Hyundai and Kia are in dire need of moving product.

Seems to me the Subaru, Toyota, etc. (mass market)stores I have ever visited keep a base model or two in stock just to be able to say they have one; that's not the one they really want to sell or lease. If you try, be prepared to withstand every kind of persuasion for why you should lease or buy up a level or two or three. I'd also expect the lease conclusion wear and tear inspection to be rather hyper-critical, in an attempt to make some $ on the back end. As well, even at 10K miles per year, the leased car will probably require new tires by lease end, and will need full boat collision/comprehensive insurance too.

Just my paranoid 2 cents of course. >:)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If you are above all cheap, forget brand loyalty, be flexible, and look for manufacture subventioned leases from better reputation brands that are down on their luck in sales, and in need of moving product. In recent memory, in the Dallas area, there have been some great deals in this way from Acura and Infiniti. In mass market brands, Hyundai and Kia are in dire need of moving product.

Seems to me the Subaru, Toyota, etc. (mass market)stores I have ever visited keep a base model or two in stock just to be able to say they have one; that's not the one they really want to sell or lease. If you try, be prepared to withstand every kind of persuasion for why you should lease or buy up a level or two or three. I'd also expect the lease conclusion wear and tear inspection to be rather hyper-critical, in an attempt to make some $ on the back end. As well, even at 10K miles per year, the leased car will probably require new tires by lease end, and will need full boat collision/comprehensive insurance too.

Just my paranoid 2 cents of course. >:)
Good advice, for sure. But there isn't anything else out there at this price, usable cargo capacity, fuel economy, and tow rating. At least not anything I'd be excited about driving, or strapping my kids into.

I still have full collision and comprehensive on my '11 and haven't ever used either, other than a windshield replacement. I'm cheap on some things. Insurance, tires, and comfortable shoes are areas I'm willing to spend more to get good stuff "where the rubber meets the road" - quite literally on the last two.

The quote I got from a nearby dealer even had $3800 off sticker - that's 14%. I thought that was impressive. They have two in stock. Another dealer is offering a similar deal and throwing in free remote start. That dealer has 8 of them in stock. (seven of which are green, weirdly)

I used to detail cars as a job in high school and still do my own on occasion. I can get my trade-in looking like it did when I picked it up.

How do they determine if the lessee owes them tires? Our '11 went 76,000 on the original Continentals, with my wife at the helm. The replacements (same tire, from the dealer) might make 40K with me driving. (hard to tell if it's the tire, or driver - at 96K I took over the reigns)
 

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Good advice, for sure. But there isn't anything else out there at this price, usable cargo capacity, fuel economy, and tow rating. At least not anything I'd be excited about driving, or strapping my kids into.

I still have full collision and comprehensive on my '11 and haven't ever used either, other than a windshield replacement. I'm cheap on some things. Insurance, tires, and comfortable shoes are areas I'm willing to spend more to get good stuff "where the rubber meets the road" - quite literally on the last two.

The quote I got from a nearby dealer even had $3800 off sticker - that's 14%. I thought that was impressive. They have two in stock. Another dealer is offering a similar deal and throwing in free remote start. That dealer has 8 of them in stock. (seven of which are green, weirdly)

I used to detail cars as a job in high school and still do my own on occasion. I can get my trade-in looking like it did when I picked it up.

How do they determine if the lessee owes them tires? Our '11 went 76,000 on the original Continentals, with my wife at the helm. The replacements (same tire, from the dealer) might make 40K with me driving. (hard to tell if it's the tire, or driver - at 96K I took over the reigns)
I forgot that the current Outback model is in its last 2 years of production, so lease and purchase discounts should be readily available, as you have found out. This begs the question of why not move up to a better trim level, since it probably would not cost that much more? Your choice of course. There's not that much difference in the MSRP anyway between the base and a premium, but some of the trim packages are IMO expensive for what they really are, even if it's nice to have those extra trim pieces.
For the tire wear, IIRC it's specified in the contract. But re wear and tear matters I have had friends who got off amazing well in the wear and tear inspections, and other who were jerked around. Depends on the dealer I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Weird thing is, the super low lease price on the base model doesn't match up to the rates on the Premium and Touring. SOA must be throwing money in on them. A Premium would cost me $100 a month more. Who knows. Maybe they have a huge stash of non-electroluminescent gauge clusters and manually-adjustable cloth seats to use up and they're building more base models than the market can consume?
 

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Weird thing is, the super low lease price on the base model doesn't match up to the rates on the Premium and Touring. SOA must be throwing money in on them. A Premium would cost me $100 a month more. Who knows. Maybe they have a huge stash of non-electroluminescent gauge clusters and manually-adjustable cloth seats to use up and they're building more base models than the market can consume?
let us know how the deal works out for you!
 

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$3000 down. $149 a month for 3 years. The Premium is about $260 with the same money down. Still a good deal, but how much money is SOA throwing at the base model deal? Throw in the turn-in charge and I'd still be under $9000 to drive a 2018 Outback for three years. I'm looking at a tenth of that amount just to put tires, a battery, and an oil change in my '11 - which blue books at 9K trade in.

I just can't wrap my head around this. I give them my 2011 and they give me a brand new Outback and a $6000 check (9K minus $3000 down) and for the next 3 years I send them $149. That's $5364 in monthly payments.

But I'd take that $6000 check and knock a few months off my mortgage. The $149 a month wouldn't be a burden. I saved that much switching cell phone providers.

It's a 10K mile lease but I'd look into a 12k. I drive *exactly* 12K a year without even trying. All other lease configurations the extra mileage adds about $8 a month. Hope this one would too.

Anyone have a base model and wish every day they'd have spent another $100 every month to get all that Premium equipment? I can talk myself out of nearly every one those options - heck I used to ride a motorcycle to work daily. Anything with doors and heat is an upgrade.

Before the "life advice" folks chime in - I should clarify - I'm not destitute. I'm just cheap.

But am I missing something here?
It "seems" like a good deal. The issue with a lease is that you have zero equity at the end. You are left, more or less, with nothing.

I am in a similar situation. I have a 2011 Outback 2.5 that I want to be rid of before 100k when the CVT Warranty enhancement expires, and the timing belt job becomes due. I really, really, really like the EZ36 engine in the 3.6 models... but, I don't require an Outback anymore. When we bought it, it became our family car and we were expecting our first child. Now with two kids, my wife has a third-row SUV that is her daily driver and our family car. We never take my Outback anywhere as a family that requires the extra space.

So, I'm actually in the market for a Legacy 3.6. But, I am planning on financing rather than leasing, because the 3.6 has only the Limited Trim available.

Props to you for being... frugal (in a good way) to accept the base model.

You'll have no fog lights standard, no option for EyeSight, no all weather package,

Basically, look here for the differences.

2018 Outback specs, options, colors, prices, photos, and more

I'm going to chat with the wife about this too. My car's going to be due for new tires brakes rotors etc soon.
 

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1999 30th Anniversary Legacy Outback DOHC 2.5L 4EAT, 2008 Impreza WRX 2.5L 5MT, 2008 Impreza Wagon 2.5L 4EAT
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The only thing I would miss is the heated mirrors
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I drove a 2.5i last night and decided I’ve become spoiled driving a Limited these last few years. Why am I so cold? Oh yeah - I have to actually turn the heat on. And that car behind me has some bright lights. Oh. I need to flick the mirror lever (and no tinted windows) Now why am I so hot? Guess I need to turn the heat down.

The car was really quiet and the injection-molded rubber steering wheel didn’t feel cheap.

It’d be about $9000 to lease it over the next 3 years. And in the end I’d have nothing. Even if my ‘11 needs a transmission and some other major stuff it will still cost less than $9000 and have some value in 2021. And it has heated seats. Case closed.
 

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2019 Subaru Forester Premium, Crystal Black Silica, Pkg 15
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Agree to a point. If it’s worth 9, like you’re suggesting, it probably depreciated somewhere around 20,000 so far.

If the car is 7, or 84 months, you’re losing about $240 per month in depreciation. Granted this depreciation slows and tapers as time goes on.

So there is a cost involved too. Eventually if you keep it long enough you’ll still have nothing.

One of the perks of a lease is that generally you have a trouble free car over the three years you own it. No tire drama, brakes, etc. Everything’s under warranty.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
OP Follow up, now that I'm about halfway into my lease. I ended up working the dealers pretty hard to get a 2.5 Limited for a very good monthly payment.

Couple things I learned:

Zero down. Always. Leases from Subaru include gap insurance so you wouldn't owe anything if the car was totaled/stolen shortly after delivery, but you aren't likely to get any down payment back either. So don't pay one. Put the money in savings and earn money on it.

Tire wear: Per my experienced salesman: As long as the tires pass our state inspection (2/32 remaining) they're good. Shouldn't be a worry at 36,000 but someone who goes over their miles could be hit with an extra penalty in replacing the tires.

I ended up selling my '11 privately, put that money toward my mortgage, and the proceeds from the sale along with the mortgage interest savings just about exactly pays for all 36 months of my lease. So I turned my 100k+ mile 2011 Outback that needed tires and a battery into 3 years of use of a 2018 Outback.

So far, I'm thankful I've leased. I've had FIVE trips to the dealer over bad head units (yes, two - and they ordered a third but changed their mind and ordered an amplifier instead) so I've been thinking I will be handing them the keys and walking away at 36 months. Until today - I heard they are extending the head unit warranty to 100K miles. Along with the transmission warranty. So maybe I will keep it. They have another 18 months to figure it out. I do kinda miss my 2011, but I love Eyesight. I use it every day. The directional LED headlights are awesome too.
 
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