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2018 3.6 Touring (Canadian, so Premium I guess?)
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Call the local Subaru parts department and ask.
 

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2007 Outback L.L. Bean 3.0, 2018 Outback Limited 3.6R
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Daniel..... Thank again for the great post. I will definitely check out the two sites you recommended, but I've got a question.... I've been studying the OEM wheel options and, quite frankly, I like the wheels that came from the factory on other OBs in 2019 (other than 3.6R). Specifically, they look like 10-spoke wheels because all of the spokes are the same width (unlike ours). I'll post a photo, if I can figure out how, but the question is why the wheels I'm describing are spec'd differently? Ours are spec's as 5 x 114.3 and the ones that I like, on the other hand, are spec'd as 5 x 115?

They're both supposed to be 2019 OEM Outback wheels, so I'm at a loss. Would Subaru have changed the spindles on different OB models in the same model year?

Here are the wheels that we presently have:

View attachment 504208


Here are the wheels that I like more:

View attachment 504209
The wheels you like (standard on the Touring trim) were also the design used on the 2015-17 Outback Limited trim. Your should be able to find plenty of used examples.
 

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'17 Outback Limited 3.6R in Venetian Red.
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If you want a tire that performs well and has a 3 snow rating (aka 4 season tire) look into the BFGoodrich Advantage Sport T/A, or the Falken ZE950s. I currently have the General Gmax AS-05 and while they are awesome in dry performance, I'm looking next for a tire that will be better in snow. I did fine given we had the most snowfall on record in Nebraska for awhile.

Honestly, and this is just my opinion, if you have a good all-season tire that can handle some snow you don't NEED winter tires or wheels. Just a lot more money and hassle. I have driven in the snow belt for over 25 years in various cars. If you are careful driving the Outback with all-seasons you will be fine. Snow tires do give the best traction, but aren't completely necessary if you know how to drive carefully, especially in turns and braking. I know I'll get flamed for this, but that's just my thoughts.

And yes I have used snow tires for other cars, but that was for a 440hp RWD muscle car that was a stick shift. Despite the power, and RWD the snow tires made it easy in the snow. For a lower powered AWD Outback a good set of all-seasons may be fine. Look at the Toyo Celius or Nokian WG4s if you want extra confidence in the snow/ice.
 
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Discussion Starter #24
The wheels you like (standard on the Touring trim) were also the design used on the 2015-17 Outback Limited trim. Your should be able to find plenty of used examples.
Ken..... Well, bearing in mind that I was driving my wife's baby when this happened, finding "...plenty of used examples" isn't really that important here. ;) Her car was pristine before I did my Swedish World Rally thing and she wants it back that way, so new or professionally refurbished is the order of the day here.

The specs that I added to this thread are from a website that specializes in OEM wheels. As I mentioned, I like the wheels that I've dubbed "touring," so that's great that they were offered in other model years. Once again, I'm an old vet who spent too many years overseas wearing a uniform, so the whole wheel/tire revolution sort of passed me by while I was working for Uncle Sam. Regardless, I'm learning a lot here...and, like the man said, Necessity is the Mother of Invention... (y)

Thanks very much for adding to the thread ~ Red
 

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Daniel..... First, thanks for all of the help. I took a look at your suggestions and, in short, I prefer the Liquid Metal Splice wheels over the Konig Crown wheels.

If you take a look at the spec tables I posted earlier, in Post No. 18 (above), you will see that both of the OEM wheels that I am comparing, the Touring and the Limited, are spec'd as having a positive offset of 55mm. The Liquid Metal Splice wheels, on the other hand, are spec's at either 40mm or 42mm.

I'm certainly no aftermarket wheel expert, but doesn't less positive offset mean that the inside of the tire is closer to the wheel well liner? A wider wheel and a less positive offset has me wondering about tire rub and/or changes in handling. What are your thoughts on this?

EDIT: My reading is now telling me that I may have the concept of offset wrong. Now I'm reading that the more positive the offset -- I.E., 55mm vs 40mm -- the closer the inside of the tire is to the inside of the wheel well. Regardless, feel free to take me to wheel school. It's about time that I learn something about this..
The stock wheels are 7 inch width, the aftermarket ones are 8 inch, thus the different offset that will end up fitting perfectly. 15mm is 3/5 of an inch, so you’re splitting the difference. The overall width of the tires hasn’t changed.

It sounds like you really want to stick with the stock wheels, which is fine. If the damage is cosmetic great, but if not and you can wait I’m sure you’ll find used ones. Otherwise just pay the $$ and buy new matching OEM wheels. The reason I chimed in was because a lot of people put new wheels on and sell their old ones, so I was just trying to raise awareness of options you could explore for similar or even less $$.
 

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2010 & 2019 Outback 3.6R Limited
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Discussion Starter #26
The stock wheels are 7 inch width, the aftermarket ones are 8 inch, thus the different offset that will end up fitting perfectly. 15mm is 3/5 of an inch, so you’re splitting the difference. The overall width of the tires hasn’t changed.

It sounds like you really want to stick with the stock wheels, which is fine. If the damage is cosmetic great, but if not and you can wait I’m sure you’ll find used ones. Otherwise just pay the $$ and buy new matching OEM wheels. The reason I chimed in was because a lot of people put new wheels on and sell their old ones, so I was just trying to raise awareness of options you could explore for similar or even less $$.
Daniel..... There's no need to explain. You've been one for he most helpful posters to this thread and, like I've said, I'm new to wheel/tire mania. I spent too many years working overseas for Uncle Sam, so a lot off things like this -- and consumer communications technology -- have simply passed me by.

As for the wheels, specifically, you have to bear in mind that this is my wife's second 3.6R limited...so, long story a bit shorter, she wants the car back the way it was. I've convinced her that we can save some $$ by going with the touring wheels and, indeed, they are much less expensive. Now the only trick is to ensure that they will fit her vehicle...so the question right now is: Is there such a thing as a 5 x 115 wheel and, if there is, will it mount safely to a 5 x 114.3 hub/spindle?

My gut feeling is that Subaru wouldn't have contracted for both types of wheels for their Outback line without thinking about this...so my instincts are telling me that they can be interchanged...but thats why I'm here. I'm trying to find someone who has information about this -- and someone who's actually done this would be perfect. Regardless, I'll gladly take whatever thoughts I can get on the subject. ;) Thanks again ~ Red
 

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Discussion Starter #27
If you want a tire that performs well and has a 3 snow rating (aka 4 season tire) look into the BFGoodrich Advantage Sport T/A, or the Falken ZE950s. I currently have the General Gmax AS-05 and while they are awesome in dry performance, I'm looking next for a tire that will be better in snow. I did fine given we had the most snowfall on record in Nebraska for awhile.

Honestly, and this is just my opinion, if you have a good all-season tire that can handle some snow you don't NEED winter tires or wheels. Just a lot more money and hassle. I have driven in the snow belt for over 25 years in various cars. If you are careful driving the Outback with all-seasons you will be fine. Snow tires do give the best traction, but aren't completely necessary if you know how to drive carefully, especially in turns and braking. I know I'll get flamed for this, but that's just my thoughts.

And yes I have used snow tires for other cars, but that was for a 440hp RWD muscle car that was a stick shift. Despite the power, and RWD the snow tires made it easy in the snow. For a lower powered AWD Outback a good set of all-seasons may be fine. Look at the Toyo Celius or Nokian WG4s if you want extra confidence in the snow/ice.
Flat6..... I appreciate all of your thoughts on tires. Which tires would you be looking for to use on a bone stock 2019 OB 3.6R Limited if you want to have handling that's as good as stock, but want to have decent tread wear? If we decide that we're having too much trouble with our snow, we'll look into wheels and tires that we'll install in the snow months. In other words, I'm presently looking for tires that will allow for everything we like about out 2019 OB: great ride, great handling (especially in the wet) but a bit more tread life that we got with the factory Bridgestone Duellers.

After all, winter's almost done. Thanks for the informative post ~ Red (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
There is no such thing as 5x115 mm Subaru lug nut spacing. It's really 5x4.5 inches and that's why it's the weird sounding 114.3 mm.
SilverOnyx..... Yeah, that's what I've suspected. There's simply no friggin' way that Subaru is going to manufacture and install two different hubs for the same (general) model vehicle in the same model year.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Call the local Subaru parts department and ask.
I dd that and, quite frankly, they were non-committal....a.k.a., everybody's an amateur lawyer now. Regardless, I got the [strong] feeling that he doubted the existence of a Subaru wheel with a 5 x 115 bolt pattern, which goes along with what I've suspected: Subaru did not manufacture two separate hubs/spindles for the same model vehicle in the same model year. In my very humble opinion, It wouldn't be good business to do something like that.
 

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All Gen 5s are 5 x 114.3. It may be more cost effective to have a local shop just repair the damaged rims if you’re looking at OEM refurbs anyways. A decent shop can do it and you won’t know the difference, and at least you’ll know the extent of the damage on your refurbished rims. Short of that pick up a set in the classified section.
 

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2020 Onyx
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Even if you called and someone told you there is a 5x115 lug pattern for a Subaru they would be wrong and probably just reading from some erroneous piece of paper. It doesn't exist.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
All Gen 5s are 5 x 114.3. It may be more cost effective to have a local shop just repair the damaged rims if you’re looking at OEM refurbs anyways. A decent shop can do it and you won’t know the difference, and at least you’ll know the extent of the damage on your refurbished rims. Short of that pick up a set in the classified section.
Dyngwal..... Do you happen to have a favorite tire that you use in the warmer months?
 

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Dyngwal..... Do you happen to have a favorite tire that you use in the warmer months?
I’m still one stock Bridgestone Duellers, low mileage (just under 28,000 kilometres in 3 years) so between spending half the year on winter tires, they’re practically new.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Even if you called and someone told you there is a 5x115 lug pattern for a Subaru they would be wrong and probably just reading from some erroneous piece of paper. It doesn't exist.
The Subaru parts department certainly didn't say that Subaru made the 5 x 115 wheels, but he also didn't clearly deny it. Like I said, a lot of people are preoccupied with legal issues these days, so a straight answer is hard to come by. Regardless, I'm probably going to buy 18" OEM wheels for our 3.6R, so now it's all about non-winter tires. Any thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I’m still one stock Bridgestone Duellers, low mileage (just under 28,000 kilometres in 3 years) so between spending half the year on winter tires, they’re practically new.
Dyngwal..... Thank you for the information. :)
 

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2020 Onyx
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I have never used either of these tires but based on reading other people's experiences:

Michelin CrossClimate 2 if you want a directional tire (good to prevent aquaplaning in water) but it can only be rotated front to back, or the Continental CrossContact LX25 if you want a non-directional tire that can be cross rotated. The Continental may be better in snow but I think both would be great.

Edit: Another consideration is that if you're also replacing the spare tire it should be non-directional because you never know which side will have the flat tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
GENERAL ALTIMAX RT43
Touring All Season

This is the tire that's been recommended to us several times now. Are there any issues that anyone can think of -- like rotation issues -- that come into play here?
 

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2020 Onyx
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I'm sure it's a fine tire and there are no rotation issues but it doesn't have the three peak mountain snowflake for what it's worth. That designation doesn't mean a tire is equivalent to a winter tire but its superior to your average all season.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
I'm sure it's a fine tire and there are no rotation issues but it doesn't have the three peak mountain snowflake for what it's worth. That designation doesn't mean a tire is equivalent to a winter tire but its superior to your average all season.
SilverOnyx..... Thanks for the post. I'm very glad to read that we wouldn't have any issues with it, and more to the point, that it's not a "specialized" tire. The plan is to purchase a set of tires we can use for most of the year now and, in the meantime, save up for a set of actual snow tires for the cold months. I guess that spending several hours pulling our 3.6R out of that snow bank was more than enough for me. Thanks again ~ Red
 
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