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We have a 2020 Subaru Outback Limited XT with 1576 miles. We just finished a 4500 mile road trip from Northeastern Minnesota (fully load with back seats down) to center Florida to pick up our InTech Pursue RV trailer. Our first tank of gas going down to Florida we saw an average 33.7 mpg, and second and third tank 32.6 mpg. This was traveling 5 to 10 mph under the posted speed limit (60/65, 60/70). Car performed great.
Bring back the RV trailer back (weight roughly 1600#, tongue weight 150 – 200#, and no brakes on trailer) the car pulled the trailer very well. We saw no trailer swerve, acceleration and braking was very good, but we never got out of 6 to 7 gear (taking out of drive and placing in manual to verify gear). The first couple of tanks of gas we saw an average 20.2 – 20.6 mpg (flat road, small hills). The proceeding mpg suffered. The best average mpg we saw 13.7 to 14.2. Hills through upper Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky and head winds through Illinois and Wisconsin were the cause in decrease mpg. Other than that we were impressed that the car could pull the trailer as well as it did given we had a loaded trailer. We knew mpg was going to suffer, but were surprised how well it handled pulling the RV. The hitch used is factory/dealer installed 2 inch receiver, 2 inch ball with a four and seven pin socket wired.
I was surprised with the car’s mpg going down to Florida because the marketed mpg is 26 city 30 highway. And how well car pulled trailer.
 

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We have a 2020 Subaru Outback Limited XT with 1576 miles. We just finished a 4500 mile road trip from Northeastern Minnesota (fully load with back seats down) to center Florida to pick up our InTech Pursue RV trailer. Our first tank of gas going down to Florida we saw an average 33.7 mpg, and second and third tank 32.6 mpg. This was traveling 5 to 10 mph under the posted speed limit (60/65, 60/70). Car performed great.
Bring back the RV trailer back (weight roughly 1600#, tongue weight 150 – 200#, and no brakes on trailer) the car pulled the trailer very well. We saw no trailer swerve, acceleration and braking was very good, but we never got out of 6 to 7 gear (taking out of drive and placing in manual to verify gear). The first couple of tanks of gas we saw an average 20.2 – 20.6 mpg (flat road, small hills). The proceeding mpg suffered. The best average mpg we saw 13.7 to 14.2. Hills through upper Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky and head winds through Illinois and Wisconsin were the cause in decrease mpg. Other than that we were impressed that the car could pull the trailer as well as it did given we had a loaded trailer. We knew mpg was going to suffer, but were surprised how well it handled pulling the RV. The hitch used is factory/dealer installed 2 inch receiver, 2 inch ball with a four and seven pin socket wired.
I was surprised with the car’s mpg going down to Florida because the marketed mpg is 26 city 30 highway. And how well car pulled trailer.
Was the trailer 1600 dry? Tongue weight spec on those is 225-325 too. Curious as pulling pretty much these specs, maybe 2100 loaded, is why I'm looking at a Limited XT over a Forester.
 

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Finally got my set up figured out

Curt hitch (easy install , excellent product) , got the Subaru wired for the four flat and then to seven pin trailer connector with separate power wire for brake controller and camper battery charge

Pulling a pop up , ~1500 pounds dry, and about 1600 pounds with battery and propane
Dry hitch weight is 116 pounds and about 180 pounds with battery and propane.

I have the 2.5 motor on my 2020 and am at 5000 feet elevation in Colorado with lots of mountain driving.

The Subaru is rated at 2700 pounds and 270 hitch weight so I have about 100 pounds margin on the hitch weight and about 1000 pounds margin for the tow rating.

Pop up has trailer brakes too, which helps.

I must say , the pop up doesn’t seem to strain the suspension at all. I’m certainly not winning any races up the hills but it does just fine, I’m quite impressed. Loaded with luggage and supplies I’m certainly in the slow lane up the hills but comfortable and doesn’t seem the motor is straining too much beyond normal. Now this is with quite a bit of margin against the advertised tow capacity. I would not recommend at all getting close to the 270 pound hitch weight and 2700 pound tow rating in the mountains at elevation. I can’t imagine at all this being anything but sweating bullets the entire time. I’ve read people getting close to 2500 pounds but in flat Midwest, close to sea level.

So far so good , doesn’t get into 8th gear but again I feel quite confident on the road and don’t feel the car is being stressed.

Cheers

ED6348C7-DDEE-46F5-AE3E-EC473803D67A.jpeg
 

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2016 2.5i
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Finally got my set up figured out

Curt hitch (easy install , excellent product) , got the Subaru wired for the four flat and then to seven pin trailer connector with separate power wire for brake controller and camper battery charge

Pulling a pop up , ~1500 pounds dry, and about 1600 pounds with battery and propane
Dry hitch weight is 116 pounds and about 180 pounds with battery and propane.

I have the 2.5 motor on my 2020 and am at 5000 feet elevation in Colorado with lots of mountain driving.

The Subaru is rated at 2700 pounds and 270 hitch weight so I have about 100 pounds margin on the hitch weight and about 1000 pounds margin for the tow rating.

Pop up has trailer brakes too, which helps.

I must say , the pop up doesn’t seem to strain the suspension at all. I’m certainly not winning any races up the hills but it does just fine, I’m quite impressed. Loaded with luggage and supplies I’m certainly in the slow lane up the hills but comfortable and doesn’t seem the motor is straining too much beyond normal. Now this is with quite a bit of margin against the advertised tow capacity. I would not recommend at all getting close to the 270 pound hitch weight and 2700 pound tow rating in the mountains at elevation. I can’t imagine at all this being anything but sweating bullets the entire time. I’ve read people getting close to 2500 pounds but in flat Midwest, close to sea level.

So far so good , doesn’t get into 8th gear but again I feel quite confident on the road and don’t feel the car is being stressed.

Cheers

View attachment 479765
That combo looks nice!
Most likely your real limit is the payload. What does the sticker say for people and gear? Around 800lbs? That includes the 180lbs tongue weight, people and cargo.
An easy way to check is to stop at truck scales somwhere and put the 4 Wheels on the scale with the trailer hitched up.
If you have only two people in the car, you are probably fine would be my guess.
 

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FYI. When I was negotiating the purchase of my Outback I was quoted a $1,000 for the Subaru hitch with installation. Later in negotiation was told the sales department cost to get the hitch with installation was $522.
 

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2018 Outback Premium 2.5
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Gettings things like hitches added at the dealership is so expensive.... No reason for it.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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I am looking to get the new 2020 turbo in Oz. Currently have a 2010 3.6 with tow bar. Our limit is 1800kg (3960lbs) and 180kg (396lbs) tow ball load. Here is how I have been using it. It holds the 170kg ok, within spec. Hoping the new Oz model can also handle the big girl as well as we like to adventure. Good to hear EU models get more rating as the US spec will not cope with what I do now.
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My thoughts on the different tow ratings. In the USA the Outback is rated at 2,700 pounds with the 2.5 engine and 3,500 pounds with the 2.4 turbo; hitch weight being 10% at either 270 or 350 pounds. Regardless, of the engine, structurally, all Outbacks can withstand the 3,500lb limit since only one hitch is provided from Subaru. Also, all Outbacks use the same brakes such as rotors and pads from my limited research so I think one can say the braking system is designed for the 3,500lb limit regardless of engine size. Subaru list a different transmission for the the 2.4 engine so the difference is in the power train from the engine to the transmission. So basically in the case of Randomdad, carrying a lot of hitch weight, I don't think it matters which power train is under the hood. Now it might be an interesting exercise to see if Subaru lists different P/N's for springs, struts, and sway bar for cars in different countries. Note: to reach my conclusion I did a search on P/N's to identify a difference. Same P/N no difference.
 

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I don't have more info yet, hoping to get it soon when they launch here in Oz. We have a tradition of hauling moderate loads with sedans/wagons rather than SUV's so a decent tow rating is needed here.
My current car shares suspension parts with the wrx, so I swapped out the original rear sway bar for a wrx model which is thicker and a lot stiffer. I wonder whether that still applies to the 2020 models?
My feeling from limited experience is that US cars have softer suspension than Oz cars, so it may be that the springs are different, and they often talk about our cars having their suspension tuned for local conditions (may be marketing BS). Time will tell, I hope to find out and let people know because I cannot carry my bike on a car with a lower towball rating.
 

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My current car shares suspension parts with the wrx, so I swapped out the original rear sway bar for a wrx model which is thicker and a lot stiffer. I wonder whether that still applies to the 2020 models?
The 2020 Outback cannot take the sway bar from previous years, or a WRX - been tried and it's different. Hoping that if the AUS version doesn't use stiffer parts, that aftermarket will come to the rescue.

King Springs are available for the 2020 USDM Outback, but so far no rear sway bars or aftermarket shocks/struts that I'm aware of.
 

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2020 Outback Limited XT Black on Ivory
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Not a capacity discussion but I did get to test the new Curt Hitch and T-one wireing harness install today. I had to do some boat swapping to and from one of my fishing clubs so I can get started with some spring repairs on the fleet. . My Malone Mirco-Light trailer is great for this sort of thing! It towed like it wasn't even there. Gas mileage was around 25mpg with 3/4 of the trip on the highway cruising at 60 mph. Fwiw, this rig seemed to level pretty well with a 3" rise ball mount.
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I’m looking for a trailer like that for my 12’ aluminum boat. I towed that boat with my triton snowmobile trailer this week and found the 3” rise perfect. I also got 24.9 mpg for 50 miles about 60/40 split highway to local roads. I held her to 62 on the highway. Driving an Onyx
 

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I’m looking for a trailer like that for my 12’ aluminum boat. I towed that boat with my triton snowmobile trailer this week and found the 3” rise perfect. I also got 24.9 mpg for 50 miles about 60/40 split highway to local roads. I held her to 62 on the highway. Driving an Onyx
It's a pretty nice trailer. Light and ballanced enough where I can easily walk it around the yard. The Thule bars allow me to add all kinds of accessories and makes the set-up very versitile. . That said, if I was going to primarily haul a small flat bottomed boat , I'd likely save some cash and get a small boat,jet ski or utility trailer that doesn't have the bars. ( But stay with the 12" wheels) . Such a trailer has a lower deck/bunk height that makes loading it easier. They are near 1/2 the price too.

I kept mine in the same 60 ish speed range for most of the trip as it was the first time I've towed with the Outback and the first time I've towed that trailer in quite a while. ( I wanted to assure the wheel bearings were happy.) I did bring it up to just under 80 on one streatch of 3 lane for a bit to get out of some thickening traffic. To be honest, I forgot the trailer was there :) Bottom line: My XT seems to tow just fine. Next month, I hope to try it with my 16' (1200#) aluminum rig. I expect the mileage will drop some but I don't expect to feel underguned.
 

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New subi owner with a 2020 here. I'm looking to get a hitch and I crawled under the vehicle looking for mounting points, but didn't see anything obvious, so I've been creepin' under other people's cars in the parking lot trying to find my answer. The closest vehicle I've found is a 2019 Forester which has a similar sheet metal structure/bumper area. On that particular vehicle the hitch appeared to replace the 5mph bumper.

On newer Subaru Outbacks does the hitch replace the 5mph bumper? All of the hitch pictures I've seen online are generic and don't provide any answers.
Just got the hitch put on my 2020 Onyx XT, 2 " receiver.
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