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2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean Edition H6-3.0
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Discussion Starter #1
I drove my 2002 OBW L.L. Bean Edition H6-3.0 up to Alaska in October 2014 at about 145,000 miles and the fuel pump went out right after I got back to Alaska.

Replaced it at a NAPA mechanic and now I’m at 231,000 miles and it went out (I think) while I was idling in line at the bank.

Anyone else have similar experiences?

Now I’m taking it to a local Subaru specialist shop. The mechanic came by my car as expects it to be the fuel pump. It turns over but won’t start.

He pulled a host under the hood and said since no fuel came out its probably the pump. Had my plugs done at 200,000 miles so it shouldn’t be that. Just SUCKS.
 

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'03 outback limited, '01 Outback Limited, '01 Legacy L wagon, '96 Legacy Brighton wagon
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Who manufactured the pump? Aftermarket anything nowadays is always a big gamble.

Also, double check that power is getting to it.
 

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05 Xt beatin' to an inch of its life
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Original injectors and damper? I’d replace those now, don’t even bother sending them (injectors) out for inspection. If they’re dirty enough that cleaning improves them significantly , they’ve done their job and need to retire.
 

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2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean Edition H6-3.0
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Discussion Starter #4
Who manufactured the pump? Aftermarket anything nowadays is always a big gamble.

Also, double check that power is getting to it.
I’m assuming the one that is in there now is a NAPA part. The shop I brought it to you uses Subaru parts. So if that’s the issue, hopefully this will last.
 

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2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean Edition H6-3.0
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Discussion Starter #5
Original injectors and damper? I’d replace those now, don’t even bother sending them (injectors) out for inspection. If they’re dirty enough that cleaning improves them significantly , they’ve done their job and need to retire.
Yes, but at this point I can’t spend more than is absolutely necessary. Not sure how much that would cost in addition to the fuel pump, but I can ask about it. I have to wait until tomorrow morning to find out.
 

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03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
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if it is the cap/o-ring problem, it can be repaired for much less than the cost of a replacement fuel pump. search for threads about that.
 

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Outbacks, SVXs, XT6, 4Runner, Celica, Brat, E150s
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The #1 cause of fuel pump failure is debris. A new pre-filter is the first step in that, but I would be tempted to rinse out that tank (I don't recall there being a drain plug on that, though. So I'd chance it before I went to the trouble to drop the tank...). Some aftermarket pump companies won't warranty one unless there's documentation to prove that the tank was cleaned before the new pump installed.

Check the cap and oring.

If there's nothing coming out of the hose, though, the pump is not running at all (in my experience, even a badly failed oring will push something through the system). Assuming your shop is smart enough to confirm that the pump is getting power, it pretty much has to be the pump.

IIRC, Subaru only sells the complete pump assembly, which goes for more money than I've spent on my last several cars. As much as you might not want to go aftermarket, the cost gap is probably enormous.
 

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2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean Edition H6-3.0
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Discussion Starter #8
Just got the call from the mechanic at A&A the Shop here in Alaska. They're quoting me $760.00 to replace the fuel pump and fuel filter. I already paid $99 to have it towed to the shop, so I don't want to pay to have it towed again, plus they have the part in stock and can have it done tomorrow. It sucks a lot, but I need the car ASAP because I work 15 miles from home.
 

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2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean Edition H6-3.0
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Discussion Starter #11
Turned out to be part of the actual pump was broken. He was able to solder some of the metal 'teeth' as he called them back which held it together.
 

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Turned out to be part of the actual pump was broken. He was able to solder some of the metal 'teeth' as he called them back which held it together.
I hope it holds. Many have tried to repair those caps, AFAIK, most have failed again. The cap and oring are replaceable.
 

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2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean Edition H6-3.0
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Discussion Starter #13
Welp, it was find until Wednesday evening.Car died while driving in town ~40mph. Managed to push it off the road. Replaced the fuel pump with a friend, now it's not starting. It's almost starting, but won't. We pulled the hoses under the hood and can see it's getting gas, we can hear the pump priming when we turn the key over, but it just won't start. Really don't want to bring it in to the shop, but I need my car to get to work.
 

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2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean Edition H6-3.0
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Discussion Starter #15
Did you replace the complete pump assembly, or just the pump motor?

Are you sure the three hoses going to the pump were re-connected to the correct fittings on the pump?

The broken cap and o-ring problem is discussed in https://www.subaruoutback.org/threads/symptoms-of-fuel-pump-o-ring-problem.41182/
We just replaced the pump motor, not the assembly. I'm 99% sure they were connected correctly because I don't think one would reach the other. If I swap them could it cause a bigger issue or would it be worth it to see if they can be switched?
 

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It's almost starting, but won't. We pulled the hoses under the hood and can see it's getting gas, we can hear the pump priming when we turn the key over,
Needs more than apparent fuel flow; it needs fuel flow at pressure (30-34 psi). Often, when the o-ring fails, there's "flow", but insufficient pressure.

Auto parts stores often lend out fuel pressure gauge kits at no cost (other than a refundable deposit).
If the 4cyl cap works for 6cyl as the threads say, would this work? https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/NDP90204381
The same basic pump assembly might be used in both, in which case that cap and o-ring should work, but I can't say for sure.

If I swap them could it cause a bigger issue or would it be worth it to see if they can be switched?
Not a good idea, as you could end up pumping fuel back along the return line, or the line going to the other side of the tank.
 

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2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean Edition H6-3.0
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Discussion Starter #18
I'm tempted to just buy a whole new assembly for $340 (in stock here in Anchorage). I can't be without a car for work next week. Already missed some this week and had to work out rides today. If the cap is cracked and that was the issue before, I don't see why something else would cause the issue this time.
 

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2002 Subaru Outback L.L. Bean Edition H6-3.0
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Discussion Starter #19
Needs more than apparent fuel flow; it needs fuel flow at pressure (30-34 psi). Often, when the o-ring fails, there's "flow", but insufficient pressure.

Auto parts stores often lend out fuel pressure gauge kits at no cost (other than a refundable deposit).

The same basic pump assembly might be used in both, in which case that cap and o-ring should work, but I can't say for sure.


Not a good idea, as you could end up pumping fuel back along the return line, or the line going to the other side of the tank.
Would it be helpful to get a gauge even if I can't start the car?
 

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Would it be helpful to get a gauge even if I can't start the car?
When the ignition is turned to On (not Start), as you noted, the pump runs for a second or two. That should prime the system, although it might take two or three cycles to really see how high it will go. Running the engine is a good idea, but if that won't work, at least the line should be primed and there's a good idea of whether or not it's reaching the right pressure. Also, once the pump stops running, the pressure should hold; if it drops rapidly, that could again indicate the cap is leaking, or there's a problem elsewhere.

Note: the fuel pressure gauge is connected into the fuel delivery line using a "T" (usually at the fuel filter connection) so that the fuel rails and fuel pressure regulator downstream of the filter are all in the system during testing.
 
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