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Edit: In the below post I'm presuming that the oil coolers are for the CVT fluid and not the engine oil. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

In the Ascent, if you don't have the CVT fluid cooler then tow rating is 2000 pounds. With the CVT fluid cooler it's 5000 pounds.

Note that there is a transmission case CVT fluid cooler that is in all Ascents, 2020 Outbacks with XT but not with the 2.5, but it was in the 2019 2.5.


All of our 2020 Outbacks have this oil cooler:


The CVT fluid cooler that's missing from the base Ascent with only 2000 pounds towing capacity is this one:

 

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2015 3.6R Limited w/ES
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Just hope they used the right fluid. ;) I recall someone posting (may have been on the Forester forum) that they asked to see the fluid that their dealer intended to use on their XT (same HTCVT as the 3.6) and were shown the regular (blue TR580) fluid. But that was probably a few years back, when the high-torque fluid was still relatively new. And, as you say, dealer performed, so it's on them.
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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...the regular (blue TR580) fluid. But that was probably a few years back ...
Yes, it must have been. The proper fluid for the TR580 has been CVTF-II (dark green) since MY 2015. The new green fluid replaced the older blue fluid in all TR580 applications. See attachment.
 

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Just hope they used the right fluid. ;) I recall someone posting (may have been on the Forester forum) that they asked to see the fluid that their dealer intended to use on their XT (same HTCVT as the 3.6) and were shown the regular (blue TR580) fluid. But that was probably a few years back, when the high-torque fluid was still relatively new. And, as you say, dealer performed, so it's on them.
Yes I remember a post where the dealer was going to use the wrong fluid. For reference, there is yet another new fluid - clear/amber CVTF-LV for use in the TR690 in the Ascent and 2020 XT. SOA748V0300
 

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Brucey
'17 3.6
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Yes I remember a post where the dealer was going to use the wrong fluid. For reference, there is yet another new fluid - clear/amber CVTF-LV for use in the TR690 in the Ascent and 2020 XT. SOA748V0300
That chart is super helpful!

I noticed the XV Hybrid apparently uses a traditional transmission?

Also it's odd to me the HT-TR690 has more fluid in the 3.6 Outback than the Foz XT or WRX.
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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Also it's odd to me the HT-TR690 has more fluid in the 3.6 Outback than the Foz XT or WRX.
I don't know for sure, but the difference may be in the plumbing for the Outback's two CVT fluid coolers.
 
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My dealer claims a fluid change every 100,000km here in Calgary Canada. First i heard about the TCM today. Ive read many threads and its really a personal preference. Some claim all types of different fluids to use. Im not much of a “only the mfg has the only fluid that will“ work believer. Redline and Amsoil have been making fluids of good quality. Is kind of like the Duramax Allison debates Transynd only or else back in the day. $400 to drop 4-6L isnt really cost effective imo. Its a Subaru.
Subaru makes its own ATF fluid"[email protected] the JATCO plant in JAPAN, JAPAN AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION CO.HAS BEEN AROUND SINCE POST WW2.GM BUILTED THE PLANT DURING TRUMANS RECONSTRUCTION ERA!
 

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It's not Subaru liability. It's the dealership liability. If a tech at a dealer screws up, the dealer can't go to Subaru and make a claim.

I'll pull it up when I get to the shop. I believe it's stated "Inspect fluid level and condition".
Nice to finally hear said... because we’ve experienced that quite a few times.

Subaru knows the SLS head gaskets on the EJ25 SOHC engines fail to restrain oil after 70k miles or more due to deterioration. It's considered a normal condition. Replacing the SLS with MLS insures the engine won't leak oil from the HG in the future and also comes with added benefit concerning HG breech during an overheating event. Subaru is not going to update their repair procedures to include the use of MLS gaskets on a SOHC engine. Those of us that know the benefits choose to go with MLS anyway.
That’s nice and fine, and probably a good idea, but that is in no way the same as changing your transmission fluid with a completely different brand… More to the point putting transmission fluid that wasn’t specifically made for that CVT in the vehicle.

All transmissions are assembled in a clean room. Dust and small particles that may get in to the trans or CVT can damage the clutch materials or interrupt solenoid function.
...as in guys wear white tyvex suits and air filtration down to .03 micron?

What you fail to know is a replacement valve body for the TR580 comes with materials to assist in keeping the work area clean while you replace the valve body, which is on top of the unit, while working in a shop environment and the CVT stays in the car. It's pretty much a sheet a plastic with a section cut out the size of the valve body cover and it's to be taped to the hood and fenders prior to cover removal. That's all nice but in a shop there's dust and air moving around. A sheet of plastic helps, but it's not 100%. So "clean room" is moot.
They come with those materials so that psychologically when it technician goes to work on one of the transmissions they are ultra careful because any contamination can cause serious consequences.

Wrenchers have a tendency to take the most expedient and easy way out of just about anything in order to make as much money as they can on the job by reducing the amount of time it takes to perform the work but still charging the book rate.

Some people are really good great mechanica, but many have the attitude that its “not my car, so I’ll take a shortcut if I can.”

This is why we had three engine replacements in one of our Subarus. If they had just let me do it we wouldn’t have that problem so long as the new rings were GTG...

I replace fluid in a lot of CVTs and it's not a complicated chore with rocket science procedures. I don't understand why members of this forum that apparently do not work in the industry, barely perform maintenance on their own cars and have limited knowledge of how a combustion engine, transmission, or CVT functions, get on here and other threads and post what they post in apparent attempts to scare someone in to not doing a basic service. The only thing I disagree with in this whole scenario from the OP is the use of Amsoil. I wouldn't put it in and mix it with the fluid already in place. There's no proof anywhere that a CVT fluid change performed normally using the Amsoil is beneficial and does not harm the unit in the short or long term. Amsoil test are always performed with a clean unit and only the Amsoil installed. They tested a Nissan CVT. Big deal. Those units are trash and fail so regularly that it's the first place I go when looking at a Nissan for possible purchase for the lot. Subaru is not Nissan. Maybe Amsoil is the answer to Nissan's fail. I wouldn't use it in a Subaru.
i’ve rebuilt a lot of engines in my life, I’ve even rebuilt a few transmissions. I don’t think I’ve run across anything that was actually incredibly difficult per se. I have run across stuff that was just time consuming.

The reason I am telling the guy not to change transmission fluid is because the doofus wants to put something in there that’s not Subaru CVT fluid. It simply doesn’t make any sense and I can’t imagine what he hoped to accomplish other than potentially screwing up the transmission. If his intention is to get the thing to shift better… Well that ain’t gonna work.

Not to mention the fact that there is a very specific procedure that Subaru tells you you need to use in order to change that fluid which most people don’t have the tools for. Is replacing the CVT as easy as warming the car uo, turning it off, pulling the drain plug, and topping it off?

Combine that with the fact that the case of CVT fluid sitting in my garage has already been supplanted with a new version of CVT fluid, one has to assume that Subaru has either been having problems or continuing to tweak things. (...And when I say a new version I mean a new reformulation of the fluid I already have, not the new variant of CVT that Subaru created for other transmissions.)
 

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Combine that with the fact that the case of CVT fluid sitting in my garage has already been supplanted with a new version of CVT fluid, one has to assume that Subaru has either been having problems or continuing to tweak things. (...And when I say a new version I mean a new reformulation of the fluid I already have, not the new variant of CVT that Subaru created for other transmissions.)
Could you tell us which CVT fluid you're referring to, and how one can tell if the CVT fluid is the new reformulation?
 
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