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2019 Subaru Outback Touring 3.6R
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Discussion Starter #1
I just completed my 24,000 mile service on my 2019 Outback Touring 3.6R. While looking ahead to my 30,000 mile service I notice it calls for
"Replace Fuel systems, lines and connections ". Are you kidding me? What the **** does that mean and how much would it cost?
 

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2019 Subaru Outback Touring 3.6R
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Discussion Starter #5
I certainly hope it is just a typo. I can't even understand changing the brake fluid after only 30,000 miles. That will be about a year for me. I am 75 yrs old and have been driving 60 yrs. I have never changed the brake fluid it a car.
 

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2018 Outbacks, Grey Premium & Silver Limited
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Brake fluid flush is the main item of the 30,000 mile service. If your Outback has Eyesight it is important and needs to be done.
 

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2019 OUTBACK 2.5 TOURING
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OK, I don't have a problem with changing brake fluid at 30,000 miles. Probably a good practice and not all that expensive. What though does having the eyesight system have to do with it?
 

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I'd check again, that service item line is all "Inspect" in my booklet, and I doubt they made any changes to it throughout Gen 5. The next line, "fuel filter", does have a "Replace" at 72k miles (which, FYI, is typically considered unnecessary and ignored).
 

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OK, I don't have a problem with changing brake fluid at 30,000 miles. Probably a good practice and not all that expensive. What though does having the eyesight system have to do with it?
Eyesight is primarily reliant upon the braking system to slow the vehicle down when using the adaptive cruise control.

Eyesight is near entirely dependent upon the braking system to slow the vehicle down, if not stop it altogether, in any emergency braking situation.

I would want my brakes working as best they can irregardless :)
 

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I remember another thread where this came up... if you are looking at the online version of the maintenance schedule, there are a few misprints. One was this thing about replacing fuel lines. I would ignore that and use the list/chart in the warranty and maintenance booklet.

online misprint like so:

481078

The 60,000 and 90,000 only say to inspect those... so I'd skip the replacing and just inspect them ;)

481080

 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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What though does having the eyesight system have to do with it?
It's not just EyeSight. All brake hydraulic circuitsin the Gen 5 Outback pass through the Hydraulic Control Unit for the VDC/ABS/AWD systems. There is a fine filter screen at the inlet to the HCU which is very sensitive to any brake fluid contamination and/or deterioration. There was even a recall several years ago affecting a few cars that were charged with water-contaminated brake fluid at the factory, with the possibility that the HCU filter could become completely clogged.

Brake fluid has a high affinity for water; it will suck water vapor right out of the air. In the worst case scenario, water-saturated brake fluid will also begin to corrode steel brake lines and other metal parts from the inside, which can eventually lead to brake failure.

The service life of brake fluid is primarily determined by long-term absorption of water vapor from the air, which is more a function of time and humidity than of miles traveled. 30 months/30,000 miles is a very conservative schedule for most climates, IMO, but it's probably a good idea if you live in a coastal and/or high-humidity environment.
 

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2015 Outback 3.6R Package 23
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The service life of brake fluid is primarily determined by long-term absorption of water vapor from the air, which is more a function of time and humidity than of miles traveled. 30 months/30,000 miles is a very conservative schedule for most climates, IMO, but it's probably a good idea if you live in a coastal and/or high-humidity environment.
If you live somewhere with constant rain and humidity, 2 years is appropriate. If you live in the desert, you likely would never need to change it. Most of us fall somewhere in-between. I'm coastal New England in the summer. I start thinking about it at 2 years and try to get it done by year 3. Unless your dealer is price gouging, it should be sub-$100. I usually pay more like $80.

If you tow or do a lot of city/mountain driving where you heat up the brakes cherry-red, water in your brake fluid lowers the boiling point. Your brakes really degrade to the point of being useless if that happens. That's not my normal driving condition.
 

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some people over maintain their vehicle, for example, they see the level is 1/10th inch low from full, and they have to top it off

in doing so, especially if it is a humid day, you've done more harm than good
if you must add fluid, at least do it on a day of low humidity
 

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some people over maintain their vehicle, for example, they see the level is 1/10th inch low from full, and they have to top it off

in doing so, especially if it is a humid day, you've done more harm than good
if you must add fluid, at least do it on a day of low humidity
If you are talking about brake fluid, people should not be topping it off at all (for the reason you mentioned, more harm than good).
It's a sealed system and the reservoir is there to provide the extra fluid needed as the pads wear.

As long as there isn't a leak, it doesn't need to be touched except for flush schedule.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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I remember another thread where this came up... if you are looking at the online version of the maintenance schedule, there are a few misprints. One was this thing about replacing fuel lines. I would ignore that and use the list/chart in the warranty and maintenance booklet.

Spot on Walker. I fell into a bit of a trap with an online chart that is almost identical to the actual booklet. The wording is quite different when it comes to defining sever driving.

A
 

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I certainly hope it is just a typo. I can't even understand changing the brake fluid after only 30,000 miles. That will be about a year for me. I am 75 yrs old and have been driving 60 yrs. I have never changed the brake fluid it a car.
Brake fluid is hydroscopic and absorbs water from the atmosphere. I've been twisting wrenches since the 1940s and have had to replace corroded brake cylinders more times than not when the corrosion pitting was too deep to hone out! I personally replace my brake fluid every two years. Be careful about the type of brake fluid that you use and spend a little extra to use what is recommended. If you have someone to pump the brakes for you the hardest thing for me now is getting up afterwards :) If you are alone buy a set of Russel Self Bleeding Valves. Good luck
 

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'19 Outback Touring 3.6R
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Brake fluid is hydroscopic and absorbs water from the atmosphere. I've been twisting wrenches since the 1940s and have had to replace corroded brake cylinders more times than not when the corrosion pitting was too deep to hone out! I personally replace my brake fluid every two years. Be careful about the type of brake fluid that you use and spend a little extra to use what is recommended. If you have someone to pump the brakes for you the hardest thing for me now is getting up afterwards :) If you are alone buy a set of Russel Self Bleeding Valves. Good luck
I buy direct from speedbleeder.com I believe THEY are the original and everyone else just copied them.
 
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