Subaru Outback Forums banner
61 - 66 of 66 Posts

·
Registered
2005 OBW 2.5L, 1989 Subaru Justy, RIP Blu
Joined
·
7,355 Posts
2012 Subaru maintenance schedule and new car break-in period

Interestingly if you use regular oil it is 3750, if you use synthetic it is 7500. How oddly noncommittal:

Engine Oil/filter*1
2.5L 4 cylinder Outback, Legacy (except GT turbo)
5w-30 oil synthetic oil recommended by not required
1st oil change by 7500 miles or 7.5 months.
Subsequent oil changes at least every 7500 miles or 7.5 months
Note: this is the minimum required. If you use regular oil, its suggested to change the oil every 3750 miles or 3.75 mos
 

·
Registered
2014 Outback 2.5 Premium
Joined
·
373 Posts
I have yet to see proof that changing my oil at 3750 is a detriment.
 

·
Registered
2005 OBW 2.5L, 1989 Subaru Justy, RIP Blu
Joined
·
7,355 Posts
it's not. I am from the school that there is no such thing as too many oil changes. Some see it as a waste of money, some see it as insurance.
 

·
Registered
Car: 2008 Tribeca, 2010 LGT, Sold: 2005 XT Limited
Joined
·
2,926 Posts
Running extended service intervals in naturally aspirated non turbo), Subaru engines is perfectly fine with a top tier, full synthetic. (Amsoil, Pennzoil Ultra, Mobil 1/EP, etc). In the case of the turbo engines I'd be more conservative, but you can still run significantly longer than with a cheap conventional oil under the same conditions. For example I've been doing 10k oil/filter change intervals in my Audi TT turbo (1.8L/225 Hp), with a variety of Amsoil formulations and oil analysis results are consistently excellent.

TS
Do these measure 'sludge' or 'coking'? I'm honestly asking as I'm not sure standard oil analysis tells the full story for turbos. I do know they measure 'shear' which is important for our turbos.
 

·
Registered
2011 Outback Limited/2.5L/CVT
Joined
·
390 Posts
Tdelker,

You can indirectly tell how well the oil is holding with regards to deposit control. This is done by looking at key parameters such as the TBN, fuel dilution, viscosity change, the solids level and/or the levels of oxidation/nitration, depending on the lab doing the testing. Oil analysis is akin to doing bloodwork and you do need some experience to know what parameters to focus on.

The propensity for any lubricant to "coke" inside the turbocharger housing is highly dependent on driving habits. For example do you just shut down the engine after a hard, fast run or do you drive easily for the last few miles, or at least let the engine idle before shutting it down??? Even with the cheapest oils you can get decent turbo life if you allow the turbo to cool and change oil frequently. The PAO/ester synthetics are probably best for long turbo life, followed by the better Group III synthetics. This is based primarily on their respective resistance to thermal and oxidative degradation, as well as the robustness of the additive chemistry.

TS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
it's not. I am from the school that there is no such thing as too many oil changes. Some see it as a waste of money, some see it as insurance.

There have been several studies that show "aged engine oils provide lower friction and much improved wear protection capability. These improvements were observed as early as the 3000 mile drain interval and continued to the 15000 mile drain interval".

The Effect of Oil Drain Interval on Valvetrain Friction and Wear

So you may be dumping the oil just as it is improving.
 
61 - 66 of 66 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top