Subaru Outback Forums banner

21 - 40 of 63 Posts

·
Registered
2020 Forester (Looking at Outback)
Joined
·
2 Posts
Since the Covid shutdown, I have worked from home. Other than a trip to the dealer to replace a failed battery in April 2020, I have only driven 179 miles in my 2017 Outback Touring. I love my dealer and trust them to take care of my car. I do not mind paying extra for preventative maintenance and advice to keep the car in top condition. So I put off my oil change and service for a while. They nagged me via email, so I asked, “It‘s been ten months and I’ve driven 179 miles, do I need an oil change?”. I think they said Subaru recommends the change every six months whether you hit the mileage limit or not. I told them to go ahead. They will even pick up and deliver the car. What are your thoughts on routine service over time? BTW, I haven’t turned a wrench since 1982 so I am not a DIY guy for modern cars. Thanks for your thoughts. Love this forum.
When my wife's 6 month came due, we had put 303 miles on it. The service manager declared it a record.
He also said all those cold engine trips more than justified the 6 month oil changes.
Besides, some old timers believe in doing the first oil change at 100 miles to flush out the break-in byproducts.
My 12 month was only another 351 miles.

Congratulations on breaking my record !!! 😁

Saturday, I will make a 400 mile round trip to Dallas.
I'm sure my Subi will appreciate getting a chance to stretch. 😁
 

·
Registered
2019 Subaru Outback Limited 2.5i
Joined
·
55 Posts
If you’re no longer under warranty and not driving much, synthetic oil needs to be changed annually. You can do it yourself for $20-$25 including filter. You should also drive your car once a week to bring the oil up to temperature and burn-off any moisture/condensation in the engine.
 

·
Registered
2011 Outback 3.6R Limited
Joined
·
23 Posts
The crude oil in the ground is not the same thing in your oil pan. It’s been refined and reformulated blended with other chemicals, detergents and additives. Once in your engine it starts to breakdown as it is heated and cooled, mixing with unburned fuel as part of internal combustion process. Over time, it won’t stay homogeneous and it looses some of its lubrication properties. Oil is cheap insurance to protect something that is expensive to replace as your engine. Gasoline is another refined and reformulated chemical that is even less stable than oil. For me, I’d rather spend small money changing important fluids than big money replacing engines and drive components. But that’s just my opinion.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I'd be more concerned about RODENT infestation or spiders, debris clogging drains, wipers hardening, flat spotted tires, dead battery, brake problems, exhaust issues, mildew, hardened seals and rubber bits, maybe even some paint or rust issues.

Nothing destroys cars faster than letting them sit unused. I've purchased tens of vehicles that have sat for extended periods, and I've seen a lot of issues. RARELY have I seen engine oil or internal corrosion issues, noisy, collapsed lifters on occasion.

Before you "fire it up" for a drive, I would recommend turning over the engine several seconds with the starter, no spark, to get oil circulating before hitting the power.

Maybe someone can tell us how to kill the spark on these engines?
On my garage queen Mazda, I don't kill the spark. I just pull the fuel injector relay and turn it over until I see an oil pressure on the gauge. Then I plug the relay back in and start it up. Killing the spark will cause oil dilution and wash out of your cylinder wall oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I bought a Gen6 (non turbo) when they first came out, about 18 months ago. After Covid hit, the driving went way down. It only has about 6000 miles now, at 18 months old. I had the first service done at about six months, and have received notice that I am due by Subaru's automated reminder system. I called the service area of my dealer and they said nothing was needed, but I should call sometimes in Feb (I'm now due) and use yearly as the time limit (not 6 months) for oil change.

I live outside town, so when I do drive the car, it is a minimum of about six miles at about 40 mph each way to local shopping. It gets fully warmed up with this.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SilverOnyx

·
Registered
2020 Outback Limited XT
Joined
·
173 Posts
We don't drive a lot anymore, retired, We put on only 3,600 miles in 6 months. Called the dealer about an oil change, and they told me I could wait till I put 5,000 miles on it. Of course I have no proof of this phone conversation.
 

·
Registered
2018 Outback 2.5i Limited with Eyesight
Joined
·
163 Posts
We don't drive a lot anymore, retired, We put on only 3,600 miles in 6 months. Called the dealer about an oil change, and they told me I could wait till I put 5,000 miles on it. Of course I have no proof of this phone conversation.
Putting about 10k year my Outback and about 3k on the wife's Forester. I get the same from the dealer, but not in writing, so I change it. Life was so much earlier on my old Accord and it told you when to change the oil.

Gary
 

·
Registered
2015 Outback 3.6R Package 23
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
I think oil change interval for a low mileage car depends on how the car is stored. If it's in a heated garage, 18 months should be fine. If it's outside in a humid place with big temperature swings where you get condensation, 6 months couldn't hurt. Look at your brake rotors. If they're oxydized, change the oil at 6 months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,029 Posts
I don't know what you are going to classify as a "modern engine" but you might want to talk to Toyota before stating they don't build-up sludge. Toyota paid a class action settlement in 2007 because of engine sludge. This was a direct result of stretching out oil change intervals on many post 2000 vehicles. They have since changed their recommendations drastically.

They are not the only manufacturer who has gone back and decreased mileage for oil change recommendations or recalibrated their automated reminder systems. There is little problem with sludge build-up in the OP's particular case but oil changes because of miles or time is still the number one cheapest maintenance step you can take.
Actually, the “gelling” was a direct result of incorrect oil port sizing within the heads and the use of syn oil prevented the problem..... and since then Toyota promoted 10K OCI’s using Syn oils.
 

·
Registered
2018 OB 2.5 Ltd, No Eyesight, No Navigation
Joined
·
3,016 Posts
Non-OCD oil changes will keep the car running fine during the warranty period. But if you think you might keep your Outback for 20 years and/or 250k miles, you should perform OCD oil changes (every 6 months).

In fact, it may be EASIER if you do it at least every 6 months. Here is why... Let’s say you have an EZ Oil Drain valve down there, while the oil filter is on top of your superior 2.5 engine. That’s great. If you change your oil every 6 months, your skills will be in good practice and you can knock out the oil change like brushing your teeth. In contrast, if you wait for a year, your skills will get rusty and the process will take longer. For example, you will forget if you use an oil pan or an old oil bottle to capture oil, and you will cause a spill that you have to spend 30 minutes cleaning up. So, you effectively spend the same total amount of time but end with only one oil change per year. That is NOT great.

By the way, the last oil change on my 2.5 OB was so easy and mundane that I seriously did not remember doing it 3 days afterwards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,029 Posts
I think oil change interval for a low mileage car depends on how the car is stored. If it's in a heated garage, 18 months should be fine. If it's outside in a humid place with big temperature swings where you get condensation, 6 months couldn't hurt. Look at your brake rotors. If they're oxydized, change the oil at 6 months.
spot on.... and driving a car long enough to throughly and heat up the oil and engine every few days minimizes if not eliminates moisture issues especially when garaged (heated or otherwise).
 

·
SubaruOutback.org Founder
2021 Outback Limited 2.5L - 🍦The Ice Cream Man🍦
Joined
·
5,507 Posts
I HAVE DELETED SEVERAL POSTS IN THIS THREAD

I don't know exactly why so many posters have veered off into the realm of politics and other non-related topics but it needs to stop immediately. Politics are forbidden on this website.
 

·
Registered
2015 Outback 3.6R Package 23
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
Non-anal-retentive oil changes will keep the car running fine during the warranty period. But if you think you might keep your Outback for 20 years and/or 250k miles, you should perform anal-retentive oil changes (oil change every 6 months).

In fact, it may be EASIER if you do it at least every 6 months. Here is why... You have your EZ-Drain valve down there and your oil filter on top of your superior 2.5 engine. That’s great. If you change your oil every 6 months, your skills will be in good practice and you can knock out the oil change like brushing your teeth. If you wait for a year, your skills will get rusty and the process will take longer. For example, you will forget if you use an oil pan or an old oil bottle to capture oil, and you will cause a spill that you have to spend 20 minutes cleaning up. By the way, the oil change on my Outback is so easy and mundane that I seriously did not remember doing it 3 days later.
When I replace my 3.6R with a turbo, I'll DIY with an oil extractor and let the dealer do it once in a while just to get the car eyeballed. When it's that easy, it's not a big expense to change the oil frequently. $25 for a jug of Mobil One at Walmart if it's not on sale and an OEM filter bought online. Rotate tires when the snow tires go on and off. Engine air filter and cabin air filter every summer in my driveway like I do now. Wiper blades every couple of years like I do now. I keep forgetting to do the rear one that's sitting here.
 

·
Registered
2017 2.5i Premium Lapis Blue
Joined
·
4,428 Posts
I HAVE DELETED SEVERAL POSTS IN THIS THREAD

I don't know exactly why so many posters have veered off into the realm of politics and other non-related topics but it needs to stop immediately. Politics are forbidden on this website.
I hate when I miss out on the fun stuff. :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Since the Covid shutdown, I have worked from home. Other than a trip to the dealer to replace a failed battery in April 2020, I have only driven 179 miles in my 2017 Outback Touring. I love my dealer and trust them to take care of my car. I do not mind paying extra for preventative maintenance and advice to keep the car in top condition. So I put off my oil change and service for a while. They nagged me via email, so I asked, “It‘s been ten months and I’ve driven 179 miles, do I need an oil change?”. I think they said Subaru recommends the change every six months whether you hit the mileage limit or not. I told them to go ahead. They will even pick up and deliver the car. What are your thoughts on routine service over time? BTW, I haven’t turned a wrench since 1982 so I am not a DIY guy for modern cars. Thanks for your thoughts. Love this forum.
I would be tempted to ask the dealer if they change the oil in the new cars on their lot if they have not sold in 6 months?
 

·
Registered
2018 OB 2.5 Ltd, No Eyesight, No Navigation
Joined
·
3,016 Posts
I would be tempted to ask the dealer if they change the oil in the new cars on their lot if they have not sold in 6 months?
Why would a dealer have any motivation to do so? The dealer will not be owning the car at 150k miles. This kind of OCD maintenance (every 6 months) is for people looking way out to the future. If I knew I was going to trade-in the car in less than 5 years, I definitely would NOT bother changing oil at 6 months and only 1 thousand miles.
 

·
Registered
2017 2.5i Premium Lapis Blue
Joined
·
4,428 Posts
Why would a dealer have any motivation to do so? The dealer will not be owning the car at 150k miles. This kind of OCD maintenance (every 6 months) is for people looking way out to the future. If I knew I was going to trade-in the car in less than 5 years, I definitely would NOT bother changing oil at 6 months and only 1 thousand miles.
I think the point about the dealer doing it was more in reference to keeping up the required maintenance to avoid voiding the warranty. If it will be required by the owner it should be required by the dealer before it is sold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
yikes. 18mi/mo sub-cedes my 85yo mom's buick that is 3yo with only 1,500 miles. Didn't think that was possible.

You're gonna have a heck of an appealing classified ad someday when you go to sell it.
 

·
SubaruOutback.org Founder
2021 Outback Limited 2.5L - 🍦The Ice Cream Man🍦
Joined
·
5,507 Posts
I would be tempted to ask the dealer if they change the oil in the new cars on their lot if they have not sold in 6 months?
I think the point about the dealer doing it was more in reference to keeping up the required maintenance to avoid voiding the warranty. If it will be required by the owner it should be required by the dealer before it is sold.
A new vehicle warranty does not begin until a new vehicle is sold and thus a dealership would have no imperative to perform an oil change according to a time based circumstance.
 

·
Registered
2017 2.5i Premium Lapis Blue
Joined
·
4,428 Posts
A new vehicle warranty does not begin until a new vehicle is sold and thus a dealership would have no imperative to perform an oil change according to a time based circumstance.
That was part of the point I was trying to help clarify. The required maintenance intervals aren't as important for actual service life as they are for keeping the warranty intact.

It wouldn't be cost-effective for small vehicles but you could just periodically do engine oil samples and never change the oil until the sample results said it was time.
There are semi trucks running around for well over 100,000 miles and even double that on the same oil doing just that. If the sample shows the base number getting low (base being oil's version of an antacid) they can just add some base and keep running as long as the rest of the sample shows good. For diesel engines you can even get oil filters with base in them (Luber-Finer TRT) to replenish the base so the oil change time can be extended.

Obviously with big trucks there are larger amounts of oil and pretty high cost oil changes so doing change intervals based on oil samples can be very cost effective. Since an oil sample may cost about the same as just changing the oil it wouldn't be as practical to use that for smaller engines. But it would be interesting to see how long a regular car engine could go before an oil sample showed it was time to change it.

Personally I am just going to keep changing the oil in my Outback every six months.
 

·
Registered
2018 OB 2.5 Ltd, No Eyesight, No Navigation
Joined
·
3,016 Posts
I think the point about the dealer doing it was more in reference to keeping up the required maintenance to avoid voiding the warranty. If it will be required by the owner it should be required by the dealer before it is sold.
OK, I get that explanation, but I am thinking the maintenance records would include miles and sale date. So the car could sit on the lot without an oil change and without consequence for future maintenance records.
 
21 - 40 of 63 Posts
Top