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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi All,

I know lots has already been written about towing with an Outback but unfortunately I still a bit confused and would welcome any advice, suggestions or opinions, about towing a utility trailer with a Subaru Outback. (My wife and I are moving ~3000 mi from Pennsylvania to Vancouver, BC and plan to buy a utility trailer to bring the minimum necessary clothing, books, furnishings)

In particular, then, a few very specific questions. Thanks in advance for your time and help.

1. Does anyone have any experience with the *real* towing capacities of a 2007 Subaru Outback (XT, MT). Factory specs say I should be able to tow 2700 lbs safely with my factory installed class I hitch, but I get nervous thinking about dragging all that weight up through the Rockies...Should I expect the smell of a burning clutch? Any advice?

2. It seems that trailers with larger wheels are more stable and probably easier to take cross country. I've found a nice 5x8 with 15" wheels, which looks more solid than the usual Walmart 12" wheel version, but of course it's heavier by ~250 lbs.). Any preferences?

3. Most trailer forums emphasize suggest strongly that a trailer over 1,000 lbs or so should be fitted with breaks, which makes sense. Anyone do this themselves and/or know the approx. cost?

4. Any advice for the, um, lead-footed among us about optimal towing speeds to keep the car in good shape?

Thanks again!

ade678
 

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Meh.
I has wagons.
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Somebody Else's XT
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Talk to Seabass, he's probably done more xc towing than anyone in an XT. I've got my time in the XT but only just bought a hitch for the odd utility haul across town.
 

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76 Posts
Hi! Did you do the move with a utility trailer? I'm trying to figure out what I am going to do, either cargo (enclosed) or utility (open).
 

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Your primary issue will be cooling and braking. The less the trailer weighs the more cargo weight you can haul. Open trailers have weight advantages over enclosed. Typically cheaper to find also. Tire size the larger you go the more dependable the bearings and tires on long trips.

Ill dig around for the thread similar to yours. We covered trailer ideas and packing tips for some one doing a similar trip. He targeted about 1500lbs given he was crossing hot AZ and climbing the front range. I recall
 

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On the Super Mod Squad
2002 3.0 VDC Wag + 2018 2.5 Leg Ltd
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Talk to Seabass, he's probably done more xc towing than anyone in an XT. I've got my time in the XT but only just bought a hitch for the odd utility haul across town.
should be @Seabass ?
 

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2005 3.0 R n totaled
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If you want to be comfortable and not worry too much about your car's limits, avoid mountains, if and when moving from East Coast to West Coast. Try to avoid those Rockies... Although it may take more time and it's a longer drive, take I-10 West (from JAX) and hook up with I-5 in SoCal North....
Also, drive most of the time at night...
This may be water under the bridge since the original inquiry was placed here 2 years ago....
 

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On the Super Mod Squad
2002 3.0 VDC Wag + 2018 2.5 Leg Ltd
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If you want to be comfortable and not worry too much about your car's limits, avoid mountains, if and when moving from East Coast to West Coast. Try to avoid those Rockies... Although it may take more time and it's a longer drive, take I-10 West (from JAX) and hook up with I-5 in SoCal North....
Also, drive most of the time at night...
This may be water under the bridge since the original inquiry was placed here 2 years ago....
good catch. ...I missed that,...everyday its a wormhole here.

 

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2005 3.0 R n totaled
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eagleeye:

Is that a modern world Winnebago? ... and they don't stop for anybody..

Dark Helmet: Before you die there is something you should know about us, Lone Star.
Lone Starr: What?
Dark Helmet: I am your father's brother's nephew's cousin's former roommate.
Lone Starr: What's that make us?
Dark Helmet: Absolutely nothing! Which is what you are about to become.
 

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2014 Outback 2.5i touring package
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If you want to be comfortable and not worry too much about your car's limits, avoid mountains, if and when moving from East Coast to West Coast. Try to avoid those Rockies... Although it may take more time and it's a longer drive, take I-10 West (from JAX) and hook up with I-5 in SoCal North....
Also, drive most of the time at night...
This may be water under the bridge since the original inquiry was placed here 2 years ago....
That's a long way south. If the origin is in the US northeast and the final destination is the BC coast, the best mountain-avoiding route would be to cross the border in Manitoba and follow the yellowhead highway (#16 and #5), then take highway 1 at Kamloops. Still a bit longer than taking I-90 to Seattle, but the highest elevation on the whole trip is under 1200 m (4000 ft).
 

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It's my bad, guys! I dragged this up to ask how it went. Thanks for all the links, subiesailor.
Its no big deal,...although it is sad when someone is answering a question for a problem car that was scrapped 10 years ago, that was owned by a member that has not signed in since.

probably someone back there with a thread asking about the best wax for a brand new 2004 Deep Sapphire,...whereas today there is a current one asking the same about 2015 Lapis blue pearl

http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/64-detailing/238042-best-wax-lapis-blue-pearl.html#post2662193



 

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here watch:

@fotomoto

putting the @ symbol in front of a name may get the members attention, vs. finding something that they quoted. on this forum it is called a "mention"

sometimes people just type my name or EE and i don't see it, unless I just randomly come back to the thread

Edit: and rasterman typed of seabass long long ago before this became possible back in the end of last year.
 

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That's a long way south. If the origin is in the US northeast and the final destination is the BC coast, the best mountain-avoiding route would be to cross the border in Manitoba and follow the yellowhead highway (#16 and #5), then take highway 1 at Kamloops. Still a bit longer than taking I-90 to Seattle, but the highest elevation on the whole trip is under 1200 m (4000 ft).
Finally I know driving details about the Northern route... thanks for your driving tips. I have driven many times from Los Angeles,Seattle and Vancouver to Okanagan through Kamloops, hauling kinds to hockey camps - but I have never been beyond Calgary/Edmonton (coming from West). Now I live in Deep South, right next to I-10, and I drive frequently Santa Monica/Jacksonville/JFK-New York several times a year...
 

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Hi All,

I know lots has already been written about towing with an Outback but unfortunately I still a bit confused and would welcome any advice, suggestions or opinions, about towing a utility trailer with a Subaru Outback. (My wife and I are moving ~3000 mi from Pennsylvania to Vancouver, BC and plan to buy a utility trailer to bring the minimum necessary clothing, books, furnishings)

In particular, then, a few very specific questions. Thanks in advance for your time and help.

1. Does anyone have any experience with the *real* towing capacities of a 2007 Subaru Outback (XT, MT). Factory specs say I should be able to tow 2700 lbs safely with my factory installed class I hitch, but I get nervous thinking about dragging all that weight up through the Rockies...Should I expect the smell of a burning clutch? Any advice?

2. It seems that trailers with larger wheels are more stable and probably easier to take cross country. I've found a nice 5x8 with 15" wheels, which looks more solid than the usual Walmart 12" wheel version, but of course it's heavier by ~250 lbs.). Any preferences?

3. Most trailer forums emphasize suggest strongly that a trailer over 1,000 lbs or so should be fitted with breaks, which makes sense. Anyone do this themselves and/or know the approx. cost?

4. Any advice for the, um, lead-footed among us about optimal towing speeds to keep the car in good shape?

Thanks again!

ade678
The 12" wheeled trailers will work just fine. The max weight usually is close to the OB max towing. I have 12" tires on my popup and it tows just fine from MD to FL (Walt Disney World) going down I-95.

The big thing to keep in mind is that ALL trailer tires* are rated for a max speed of 65mph.

SOA says over 1k requires brakes, it is not that hard to add them your self as long as the axle has a square mounting flange behind the tires. If it doesn't have one, then it can be welded on. Check etrailer for videos on added brakes.

Avoid an open trailer with a ramp, they function as a parasail on the highway.

*there are a few tires rated for 75mph but they are much larger tires for much heavier trailers
 

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2005 3.0 R n totaled
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^^^

Again, the OP's post is like 2 years old.... - don't you think ade678 reached his/her destination by now?

Cm'on guys - wake up now?
 

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2011 outback 3.6R LT. 2015 Outback 2.5 (white) eyesight, tow pakage, skid plate, moon roof
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Bigger tires are always better. They help keep trailer more level without a drop hitch. Bigger tires have more tread surface and carry load better.
I never had any trouble towing except for small 12 inch tires on a Chalet A frame pop up camp trailer on a hunting trip in a 2011 outback. both factory tires and spare failed on the highway.
The were Carlson original tires, I had to stop and replace them with Goodyear heavy duty tires.
Always use shift paddles on hills both up an down. This helps avoid excessive up and down shifting. When it down shifts I lock it down. Also use engine to hold down hill speed.
 
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