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Twilight Blue 2015 3.6R with Eyesight
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5,023 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A couple weeks ago I replaced the tires on my 2015 3.6 with Nexen CP 672.
The originals were wearing down quite a bit and needed to be replaced before winter.
I got a set, mounted, balanced, and alignment for $612.
So far they ride really nice, have good sidewalls, stiff enough to handle corners very well, and track very well in heavy rain.
It'll be interesting to see how they perform in snow.
@ 31kmi, the old Bridgestone Dueler H/P Sport AS tires were really starting to show their wear, and I wasn't about to spend almost $1k for a set of those.
Nexen is a company in South Korea, and from all I've been reading, they're pretty good tires.
They have a 70k warranty, but then again, the Bridgestone's had a 50k warranty.
Let's face it, AWD vehicles eat tires for breakfast, and look for more to eat for dinner.
I most likely could have got the old set prorated for a new set, but what a hassle...
Anyway, I guess I'll see how well these hold up.
Stay tuned!
 

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Premium Member
2015 Legacy 3.6R ES, 2014 Forester Touring ES, 2005 Jeep Liberty Limited
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3,246 Posts
Price should not be a determining factor but the specifications which closely mirrors your driving conditions and personally needs. If your commute is mainly expressway then High Mileage with the best MPGS, a hard tire (tyres)would reflect that specifications would the be best. Now, for my needs that would be the worst tires, because of weather, stopping distance is the highest priority so high mileage would be compromised for a softer quieter tire.
 

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451 Posts
I think if you list all tires from worst to best, you will find that the best tend to be more expensive. The #1 resource for tires is Tire Rack. They have the best comparisons and the best reviews. They really took the mystery out of tire buying.
 

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2017 Forester Touring 2.5i
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48 Posts
I have Original Bridgestone Dueler H/L 400s on my Forester. Don't think they will make it to 20k miles. Extremely expensive tires at $200-220 each and crap in the rain and snow.
So sometimes expensive tires are still horrible tires.
 

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06' Outback 3.0R
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219 Posts
do quality expectations change based on the price of the tire?

ive run Duglas xtra-track II (walmart) on 3 vehicles in a row now, theyre super cheap ($65-85) and i love them, very good in all conditions, i typically get 2 full seasons out of them.. acceptable for a $65 tire? i think so, acceptable for a $200 tire? i wouldnt think so.

it also depends on tire compound, regardless of price a soft tire with bigger lugs like a A/T or snow tire isnt going to last nearly as long as a harder compound street tire
 

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Premium Member
Twilight Blue 2015 3.6R with Eyesight
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5,023 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Price should not be a determining factor but the specifications which closely mirrors your driving conditions and personally needs.
I really goofed with the title of this thread.
Instead of cheap tires, I should have said affordable high-quality tires.
Nexen CP 672 tires are a very good tire, at a reasonable price. What I meant to say is, the OEM Bridgestone Dueler H/P Sport AS's are crapy, VERY over priced, lack luster tires.
For what a set of them costs, I could get two sets of the Nexen.
I understand that higher mileage tires can have VERY hard rubber, That's why I'll NEVER have a set of Goodyear tires on my car... LOL!
Thinking about it, I really wish I could change the title of this thread to Affordable High-Quality Tires, not cheap tires...
As for them having really hard rubber, no, they don't The sidewalls are stiffer than the Bridgestone, and you can really feel it in the corners, but they're also much quieter than the Bridgestones, and corner ALLOT better. Another BIG problem I was having with the Bridgestone's was TERRIBLE handling in the rain. At only 31k miles, they shouldn't be that bad, but they are.
And last winter was a nightmare! I'd say, these tires, on a 2WD vehicle, are worthless!
The ONLY reason I didn't get stuck last winter was #1 It didn't snow much. And #2 AWD.
The first winter in this car was, well, a little disconcerting... Why? Because I could tell that these tires were mediocre at best in the snow.
So far, these tires are so much better than the Bridgestone's it's not funny.

@Brucey Do you think you could change the title of this thread to
Affordable High-Quality Tires
The title is way too misleading...
I also apologise for putting it in the wrong section...
 

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On the Super Mod Squad
2002 3.0 VDC Wag + 2018 2.5 Leg Ltd
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27,048 Posts
updated thread title,

no longer "cheap",
 
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Premium Member
Twilight Blue 2015 3.6R with Eyesight
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5,023 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
3 things you never cheap out on

Tires
Self defense / carry ammo
sushi
LOL! It's not "Cheaping Out" It's choosing a good quality, inexpensive, tire.
I'll never forget spending over $900 on a set of Yokohama Avid Envigor tires for my 2009 Outback. They were great, for the first thousand miles...
After that, the performance went down the toilet so fast it wasn't funny...
Just because tires are expensive, means NOTHING about their quality. the same thing goes for a Glock 9mm. Expensive gun, that's a piece of garbage... :wink2:
 
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2010 2.5 CVT Limited
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2,006 Posts
Here's another perspective.

If a driver doesn't use their car but 5k miles per year, does the additional cost of 70k mi tires over 30k mi tires make sense?(other performance factors notwithstanding)
Most folks wouldn't keep the same set of tires on their vehicle for 14 years.
 

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Premium Member
Twilight Blue 2015 3.6R with Eyesight
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5,023 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Update

OK, I have some time and approximately 18k miles on them.
The last 2 winters they really did very well! The wet traction isn't bad either.
The road noise started off great, and hasn't really changed much. I'll never forget the $980 Yokohamas I had on my 2009 Outback got really noisy after only a couple thousand miles, and only got worse as time went on...
Checking the tread, it really looks great! I'd say they have at least 2 more years left on them!
Since getting these tires I can tell you one thing, when it comes time to replace them, I'll be getting another set!
 

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Premium Member
2017 Subaru Outback 2.5 Limited
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58 Posts
Not an automobile tire but I experienced a blowout on my two-year old utility trailer on Chinese tires last year. The trailer maybe had 500 miles on it at the time and was always stored protected from UV rays. It wasn't overloaded either.

The problem, I believe, is the source of raw materials. Granted, trailer tires may not have the quality control required of automobile tires. To replace the two tires, I found that Goodyear made a trailer tire in the USA rated for 87 mph. They were twice the price but had excellent reviews from RV owners. I also had them balanced which really helps while pulling it unloaded.

I now drive on the average of only 5K miles a year but it is just four little patches of rubber between you and the road. In the past I have used seven years as a guideline for replacement. I would still spend the extra money on high-rated rubber with the knowledge that they may be replaced due to age rather than mileage.
 

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2014 Subaru Outback 2.5 Premium
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600 Posts
I always shop around for deals when it comes to tires. They are the most expensive maintenance item on a car and I don't like to cheap out but I also don't like spending 1000.00 on a set either. I try and stick with Michelin on my main driver which would be the Outback. I do this because ever since we owned a 98 Buick Century that had Michelins I have been a believer in them. This car would get through any amount of snow you threw at it, rode great on the highway, had great stopping and the tires lasted forever. I bought the car with 60k miles and the tires had about 15k on them and when I sold it the car had 150 and the tires were only starting to get to the replacement stage. Ever since I put them on the Outback and they are doing just as good. They wear incredibly slow and give great traction in the elements. That being said I usually wait until I find them on sale or with a rebate so I can keep my costs down. Usually if I stay ahead and know in the next year I need tires I can hold out for a good deal.
 
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