Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
2016 Subaru Outback 2.5i Touring
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
so my 2016 Outback (around 90,000km = 55k Miles) battery is getting old and weak, i'm noticing specially in colder days below -15 C (below 5 F) that it hesitates a bit to starts, or if parked for couple of days. Question is:
1/ do i need to take any precaution steps before/while changing the battery so the car doesn't throw any codes or confuse the computer, ...etc. ?
2/ do i really have to go with a Subaru battery from the dealer or any other brand will do? my only worry is sometimes i have to leave my car parked in the winter for a week or two or more due to work ( #ArmyLife ), any preferred battery type or brand that won't die out if left in the cold parked for couple of weeks?

Thanks a bunch
 

·
Registered
2016 Outback 2.5
Joined
·
576 Posts
Stay away from the OEM and get an EVERSTART from Walmart or something similar. Much better battery.

I've never thrown codes when changing the battery, just have to reset everything, like the seatbelt chime, radio, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,182 Posts
Don’t use your tongue to check to see if the battery is charged.

Radio presets should stay. Anything you customized in the center information display will need to be redone.

The auto up / down feature of the power windows will need to be reset.
 

·
Registered
'15 Outback 2.5i Premium
Joined
·
2,347 Posts
i couldn't care less about radio presets, never actually used the radio.
how do you "reset" the seatbelt chime?
"Reset the seatbelt chime" means you will have to turn it off again if you had previously done so and wish to keep it silenced.

Not that it matters in your case but for the sake of completeness, the radio presets are not lost when you disconnect the battery.

The trip meters will be reset, so if you use them monitor fuel economy on a tank-by-tank basis or other things, that info will be lost. As already noted, the automatic window reset procedure will also need to be done; it's easy.

I think that the ECU will have to "relearn" optimum settings, so it might not run quite as well for a little while.

Any Group 25 battery will be a drop-in replacement. Most (perhaps all) aftermarket batteries have better specs than the factory battery. Group 24 batteries are slightly larger, but are reported to fit nicely in the tray, and Group 34 batteries probably will, but some might need a spacer (they're longer but not quite as tall); these tend to have better specs than Group 25 batteries.
 

·
Registered
'19 Outback Premium; EcoHitch, 19mm RSB, & Orsini vinyl design (see avatar)
Joined
·
57 Posts
....how do you "reset" the seatbelt chime?
You can do the procedure seated or just leaning into the car. Click and unclick (buckle & unbuckle) the driver's seatbelt 20 times within 30 seconds. That will turn off the chime so you can drive, unbuckled, without the chime going. If it doesn't work on the first attempt, just keep doing it until the car accepts. Once, I had to repeat 5 times before the car switched it off. The process DOES work (on all Subarus).

Search for Bruceyyy's video or any of the multitude on YouTube.
 

·
Registered
2016 2.5i Limited, 2013 Tesla Model S 85
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
Any Group 25 battery will be a drop-in replacement. Most (perhaps all) aftermarket batteries have better specs than the factory battery. Group 24 batteries are slightly larger, but are reported to fit nicely in the tray, and Group 34 batteries probably will, but some might need a spacer (they're longer but not quite as tall); these tend to have better specs than Group 25 batteries.
No. The Group 34 usually has higher CCA rating but lower total amp-hours or kWh than a Group 24. There is nothing inherent about 24 vs 34 that this must be so, its just one of those things that happens to be. Marketing will have you believe CCA is the magic number by which to loosen your pursestrings, but its irrelevant unless you are trying to crank a 6.7L diesel.

The Group 24 will be harder to find than a 34. Don't be fooled with a 24F which is plentiful, the terminals are swapped compared to the 24 and 25.

I bought a Group 24.

Oh, and on first start with the new battery my Outback thought it was an Impreza. It figured out on its own.
 

·
Registered
2019 Outback Limited 2.5i
Joined
·
202 Posts
Well, if you've ever shorted one and had it blow up in your face, there's that to watch out for. Being sprayed with battery acid isn't pleasant. Was dealing with the two 12V batteries in my old M-131A and not near a source of water...
 

·
Registered
2017 Subaru Legacy Sport
Joined
·
67 Posts
To change the battery, to be safe, you want to start by disconnecting the battery :p. I didn't take any special precautions in terms of using a memory saver or anything like that and I didn't have to reset any information, nor was it lost. Any group 25 battery will drop right in with nothing else to worry about. You can get a Duracell group 25 with a 3 year warranty at Sam's Club for ~$100 plus you get the core charge back from your old battery even though it is the OEM battery. I would reccommend getting a deep socket to make taking the bolts off easier. I was able to do it with just a wrench but could only do an 1/8th of a turn at a time so it definitely took me longer than it needed to.
 

·
Registered
2019 Outback Limited 2.5i
Joined
·
202 Posts
To change the battery, to be safe, you want to start by disconnecting the battery :p. I didn't take any special precautions in terms of using a memory saver or anything like that and I didn't have to reset any information, nor was it lost. Any group 25 battery will drop right in with nothing else to worry about. You can get a Duracell group 25 with a 3 year warranty at Sam's Club for ~$100 plus you get the core charge back from your old battery even though it is the OEM battery. I would reccommend getting a deep socket to make taking the bolts off easier. I was able to do it with just a wrench but could only do an 1/8th of a turn at a time so it definitely took me longer than it needed to.
If the OP wants to go back with the anemic battery Subaru used. Most will want to upgrade to a group 24 or 34 as recommended in this thread: Gen5: Replacing the original battery with BETTER
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,222 Posts
I didn't take any special precautions in terms of using a memory saver or anything like that and I didn't have to reset any information, nor was it lost.
Pretty much the same when I replaced the battery in my wife's '17 Forester a while back. Only thing that needed to be reset was the auto windows.

Replacing the battery in the Subaru is no different than other cars.
 

·
Registered
2015 3.6R Limited w/ES
Joined
·
2,769 Posts
...Any group 25 battery will drop right in with nothing else to worry about...
The same can be said for the 24 and 34, which is why they're such popular replacements.

If you want to be thorough about it, according to the FSM, you should also perform the throttle and idle relearn after any battery disconnection. Although it seems most people skip this without issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
My 19 outback had some corrosion on the battery and positive connector. The replaced it with an "upgraded battery" that said should be better. They admitted that subaru has used batteries that were under-powered but are switching to bigger batteries.
 

·
Registered
2016 2.5i
Joined
·
1,768 Posts
Don’t use your tongue to check to see if the battery is charged.

Radio presets should stay. Anything you customized in the center information display will need to be redone.

The auto up / down feature of the power windows will need to be reset.
Yeah, that. My presets stayed.
I did not notice anything about the center information display either. Can you give a few examples what would need to be redone?
 

·
Registered
2016 2.5i
Joined
·
1,768 Posts
Oh, and on first start with the new battery my Outback thought it was an Impreza. It figured out on its own.
LOL.
I agree that for a car like an Outback, the total Ah are more important than CCA. But in most cases, these numbers somewhat correlate (higher CCA most of the time means higher Ah).
 

·
Registered
2017 Subaru Legacy Sport
Joined
·
67 Posts
If the OP wants to go back with the anemic battery Subaru used. Most will want to upgrade to a group 24 or 34
I don't believe the OP felt the OEM battery was "anemic". The battery I recommended was they one I have personally used after doing extensive research and seeing other's experiences with different than OE battery sizes that do in fact fit. The battery I recommended has a significantly higher CA and CCA compared to the OEM battery, comes with a nice 3 year warranty, and is less expensive than any of the other higher capacity batteries I have seen recommended.

If his 356 CCA OEM battery has been fine for 55,000 miles, then I would not expect a 625CCA battery to be "anemic."

If the OP wants to spend more money for a higher capacity rated battery, then by all means do so! Choice is good, and there are many correct solutions to this battery question!
 

·
Registered
'15 Outback 2.5i Premium
Joined
·
2,347 Posts
No. The Group 34 usually has higher CCA rating but lower total amp-hours or kWh than a Group 24. There is nothing inherent about 24 vs 34 that this must be so, its just one of those things that happens to be. Marketing will have you believe CCA is the magic number by which to loosen your pursestrings, but its irrelevant unless you are trying to crank a 6.7L diesel.
As I recall from shopping for batteries almost a year ago, the CCA rating of Group 34 batteries (and HCA, when given) were always higher than the equivalent Group 25 battery of the same brand when both were offered, sometimes by 10% or more. I do not recall the other common measures of capacity - Ah or RC - ever being lower on the Gp. 34 - only the same or slightly higher. Maybe I didn't look at a truly representative sample of batteries or I'm remembering incorrectly, but I'm not going to go back and re-do the research until I need to buy a battery again.

The volume of Gp 25 and 34 batteries are almost identical even though the dimensions differ. This gives an indication of the maximum amount of active electrode and electrolyte that can be stuffed inside the case, which is a limiting factor for the storage capacity with a given type of chemistry and construction. Gp 24 batteries have larger volume, so it's not hard to see why they typically beat similar Gp. 25 and 34 batteries in storage capacity.
The Group 24 will be harder to find than a 34. Don't be fooled with a 24F which is plentiful, the terminals are swapped compared to the 24 and 25.

I bought a Group 24.
Given little to no advantage in the specs that mattered most to me (Ah and RC, not CA), I saw no reason to select a Group 34 battery instead of Group 25. The battery I selected was not offered in Group 24 size; if it were, I might have gone for that.
 

·
Registered
2016 Subaru Outback 2.5i Touring
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I don't believe the OP felt the OEM battery was "anemic". The battery I recommended was they one I have personally used after doing extensive research and seeing other's experiences with different than OE battery sizes that do in fact fit. The battery I recommended has a significantly higher CA and CCA compared to the OEM battery, comes with a nice 3 year warranty, and is less expensive than any of the other higher capacity batteries I have seen recommended.

If his 356 CCA OEM battery has been fine for 55,000 miles, then I would not expect a 625CCA battery to be "anemic."

If the OP wants to spend more money for a higher capacity rated battery, then by all means do so! Choice is good, and there are many correct solutions to this battery question!
I'm certainly not looking to spend more money unnecessarily (not much of disposable income left after buying the car in cash couple of months ago) but i wouldn't mind spending a little extra for something better.
I'm more concerned about a battery that'll hold up to Canadian winter and not sh*t the bed and die on me if left parked for a week or more.

P.s. i am somewhat mechanically inclined having worked on my previous car and used to be a motorcycle mechanic. But since I'm new to the Outback -and to cars that aren't 15 years old- i figured i'd ask in case I'm missing anything i should/shouldn't be doing that's specific to this car
 

·
Registered
2019 Outback Limited 2.5i
Joined
·
202 Posts
I don't believe the OP felt the OEM battery was "anemic". The battery I recommended was they one I have personally used after doing extensive research and seeing other's experiences with different than OE battery sizes that do in fact fit. The battery I recommended has a significantly higher CA and CCA compared to the OEM battery, comes with a nice 3 year warranty, and is less expensive than any of the other higher capacity batteries I have seen recommended.

If his 356 CCA OEM battery has been fine for 55,000 miles, then I would not expect a 625CCA battery to be "anemic."

If the OP wants to spend more money for a higher capacity rated battery, then by all means do so! Choice is good, and there are many correct solutions to this battery question!
20200219_133532.jpg

You don't know jack about batteries, just admit it.
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top