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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to buy this trailer:

Pursue Flyer Mini Camper

It's tongue weight is higher than recommended (250-350), but it's well under the 2700lb tow capacity.

I was looking at the EcoHitch class 3 (good to 350) and I was also going to get brakes on the trailer to mitigate over working the car brakes.

I understand the chassis/suspension may not like the tongue weight, but would stiffer springs help that? I've seen Rallitek springs (1.5 inch lift/18% stiffer).

I've looked at transmission coolers, but it seems the CVT needs a specific operating temperature and overcooling could be an issue. The amount of time the trailer will be towed versus regular use during the rest of the year doesn't seem worth it.

I've seen one guy on an owners group page towing it around without any problems reported by him so far.

Is there anyone out there towing at or above the tongue rating that has any words of wisdom?

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2013 BRZ 2005 OBXT
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A higher tongue rated receiver does not increase the max tongue weight of your vehicle just a fyi.

Its not due so much to the suspension as it is a limitation of the construction of the subframe that its attached to.
 

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Yep, my words of wisdom are buy a vehicle capable of towing that much tongue weight. Stiffer springs are not going to change the max tongue weight.
 

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Or since you already own the car find a camper that will meet your needs and your towing capabilities. There are some campers out there that will meet the light tongue weight restrictions. Look for ones with the axle more center or the load.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the responses. I understand that no one component can change the max tongue rating. I am looking to mitigate stress to the vehicle when towing so close or slightly over the limit and learn if there are any tricks or reassurances from anyone that has experience pushing the limit. I've seen people relocate the 35lb refrigerator that's mounted right near the front to aft of the axle on the inside to reduce tongue weight when towing.

Would a hitch like a DrawTite or Curt be better? They mount at multiple points under the chassis versus the EcoHitch mounting straight behind the bumper.

I've also heard of different ratings in different countries and was unsure if Subaru uses different chassis in different countries? Australia has the tongue weight (tow ball down load) as 150kg (330lbs).


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Brucey
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If you want to keep your vehicle safe then follow legal guidelines for your country. I never really bought the "but it's higher rated in other countries"

Buy a different vehicle or buy a different trailer. You can't legally tow something with a 350# tongue weight.
 

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350 is the empty weight. This is typical rookie RV or boat buyer they buy max size or over sized per their vehicle specs. Then they put stuff in them like people, gear etc. If you start over limit it only gets worse from there.
 

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Thanks for the responses. I understand that no one component can change the max tongue rating. I am looking to mitigate stress to the vehicle when towing so close or slightly over the limit and learn if there are any tricks or reassurances from anyone that has experience pushing the limit. I've seen people relocate the 35lb refrigerator that's mounted right near the front to aft of the axle on the inside to reduce tongue weight when towing.

Would a hitch like a DrawTite or Curt be better? They mount at multiple points under the chassis versus the EcoHitch mounting straight behind the bumper.

I've also heard of different ratings in different countries and was unsure if Subaru uses different chassis in different countries? Australia has the tongue weight (tow ball down load) as 150kg (330lbs).


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There are a couple of similar sized trailers you might look into. They are lighter and have a lower TW.

Here are a couple. I don't know much more about them other than what's on their websites.


https://tab.nucamprv.com/tab-teardrop-camper/?tab=3

Little Guy Worldwide

http://golittleguy.com/trailer/model/5wide/41/
 

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2007 2.5 L Obsidian Black Outback XTL
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I don't think that any competent person who understands vehicle behavior while pulling a trailer can give you assurances. Increasing the tongue weight of a trailer changes the loading of the front steering wheels compared to the rear wheels on the car. Lots of tongue load at the trailer actually reduces the weight resting on the wheels that steer. The car can get this floaty-boaty type feeling going down the road as the car tries to do a wheelie. You might try to change directions and the car delays that for a fraction of a second or you go around a curve and the car doesn't. A truck driver who has to adjust axles on an 18 wheeler will really understand that effect.

You can do lots to change the tongue weight on a trailer by how you load it. For about ten years our family did lots of camping with a pull-behind trailer. If the boys could not lift the tongue to set it on the ball hitch then it was too heavy. It was then climbing back through the little door of the pop-up camper to move the cooler to behind the trailer axle to lighten the tongue weight. A couple of times we had hilarious incidents where the tongue weight went negative and the front of the trailer popped up in the air. Usually we hit the road when the weight was (probably) around a hundred or so pounds.

The gross vehicle weight is going to affect the mounting points for the hitch, transmission and your ability to stop. On the road we had one full day in Sandusky Ohio while a garage replaced the transmission. Another full day in Somerset Kentucky while the differential was replaced after eating up the gears pulling a hill.

Our car had the electric brake box that you always banged your left knee against, Air shocks with a pressure filler under the back seat and some hideous hitch that was welded in to place.

Almost every cross country trip something else would break down and give us a day or so in some out of the way location. Sometimes those were more memorable then the destination.. like the time the boys jumped in a pond at a campground.. only to THEN realize it was the cesspool.

I always said that they were sh^theads, it just proved the point.
 
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Yeah the light 2.5L up front doesn’t give you warm and fuzzy turning ability. 350 on the Hitch would be nutz. You’ll be banging off the rear bump stops on the highway while the front tires skip along giving poor steering traction.

Get a lighter trailer
 

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Yeah the light 2.5L up front doesn’t give you warm and fuzzy turning ability. 350 on the Hitch would be nutz. You’ll be banging off the rear bump stops on the highway while the front tires skip along giving poor steering traction.

Get a lighter trailer
I find our 2018 doesn't sag that much with 440lbs of feed in the trunk and drives pretty normally. I should measure next time we do a feed run.
Even that probably doesn't quite equal 350 on the hitch.
I used to tow about 2700lbs behind our 03 Tracker and sometimes the farmer wouldn't quite load the round bales on balanced and I'm sure some times the tongue weight was around 400lbs. It squatted but drove pretty good at 50mph anyways.
IMO I would always err on loading the tongue a bit more, than going too light! And going a bit slower never hurts.
 

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