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I bought a Century BM12V Battery Monitor (see my earlier post) & connected it to our 2019 Outback 3.6R today. So far I am quite impressed with the unit including the Owner’s Manual that came with it.

In the next post I’ll attach a few relevant scanned copies from the Owner’s Manual which lists what other tests can be done.
Wow thanks for the comprehensive set of measurements. I suspect the Gen 6 outback isn't at 14.xV at idle. Maybe I'll go ahead and get a bluetooth monitor so we can compare notes.

Is the app for the Century BM12V the same as the one in this video?


Also this seems to be the same app: BM2 - Apps on Google Play
 

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(Australian spec) 2019 MY19 Outback 3.6R CVT.
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The App for the Ansel BM300 does look the same. That’s if it this one. The anceltech website won’t let me download anything (I was after a manual) without signing in. Most of the Apps for those Battery Monitors I looked at all looked very similar but some got better reviews than others.

This is the Century BM12V App. If you click on the ‘Developer > Visit Website’ link near the bottom of that page it will take you to leagend website, yet I can’t find the Century BM12V on that site. The author of the Century BM12V App is taiwanyichengkeji who also wrote the BM2 App for the Matson Battery Monitor I linked to in an earlier post. These are the Apps written by taiwanyichengkeji.

Yet the BM-2 link you posted takes me to a website that shows that App’s author as wanbarolu. Perhaps there was/is two authors for the BM-2 App, or perhaps I’m missing something!

My Outback was a bit above idle at 900rpm (revs were still dropping). I think they eventually drop down to about 750rpm. I’ll do some tests sometime later on that. I would be surprised if the gen6 didn’t get up to about 14V at 900rpm, but maybe you are right.
 

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2020 touring XT
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SilverOnyx... This is what I am seeing...
Today, I checked V with factory display. It was 11.7. I turned engine on with factory display on and it went up to 14.2V.
Then with display on factory setting, I turned engine off. It went down to 12.7 and keep going down every few seconds. And around 12.5 it started to slow down dropping then around 12.3, it is keeping 12.3-12.4.
I had my key in a pocket also.
 

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My Outback was a bit above idle at 900rpm (revs were still dropping). I think they eventually drop down to about 750rpm. I’ll do some tests sometime later on that.
I checked this & it was still charging (indicated by the BM12V reading of 14.23V to 14.24V) after the revs dropped to & settled at 700rpm at idle with the climate control turned ON (I never turn this OFF).

I drove with factory mode display and it shows almost constant 14.2 V. and 12.6 when parked and engine off.
That part looks pretty good. Going by your last post it sounds like your gen6 still shows 14.2V when it is idling, is that correct? Having your key fob close to the vehicle will keep certain modules awake & therefore increase the normal drain on the battery. But I can’t understand why your battery voltage as indicated by the Factory Settings screen is getting down to 11.7V, I would expect it to stabilise at around 12.2V to 12.3V. Do you keep the remote fob within range of your Outback? If you don't then it looks like you need to check the battery dark current over a period of time to see what is going on (sorry if you have covered this before, I didn't go back through the topic to check).

For comparison; I went for a short drive up the street this morning & the Factory Settings screen showed 14.1V to 14.2V all the time the engine was running & the BM12V varied from 14.20V to 14.27V. Before starting the engine it was 12.6V.

When I got back home I sat in the vehicle for a while & 3 minutes after switching the engine OFF something must have gone to sleep because the volts displayed from the BM12V increased slightly (easy to see on the graph). I noticed a difference between the Factory Settings screen which showed 12.6V & the BM12V which showed ~12.8V.

After the engine had been turned OFF for about an hour the BM12V reading was 12.89V (I was away from the vehicle, the door wasn’t opened & the remote wasn’t anywhere near the vehicle). I’ll see how it drops over the next few days.
 

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2018 Outback 2.5i Limited, No Eyesight, No Navigation
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So I have a brand new (1100 miles) 2020 Outback XT. Because of the social distancing mandates I haven’t driven the car in 10 days. Went to take the cat to the vet today and the battery is totally dead. Nothing lights up, not even small led’s. Luckily it was in the garage and not locked. I understand about parasitic drains, and I assume this is why the battery is dead. What if I was in an airport with the car locked? Has anyone else experienced a similar problem? Is there a way to unlock the car or at least release the hood if the battery is dead.
The original poster apparently refuses to read the manual and probably this thread too. The original poster still has just this one post after 20 days.
 

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... I’ll see how it drops over the next few days.
Unfortunately I had to terminate this particular test because my better half had to go out in the Outback. I would have liked the test to run at least another day to see if the battery voltage was going to settle at ~12.62V.

I’ve attached screen captures (click to enlarge) taken on my Samsung Tab S4 from the Century BM12V of the relevant voltage details over a 55 hour period (22-Apr-2020, 23-Apr-2020 & 24-Apr-2020 on three consecutive screens), plus cold & warm engine cranking Voltage results. I’ve added comments in red text. The screen capture showing 14.25V inside a blue circle was just after starting the engine cold on the 24-Apr-2020.

[edit] I noticed on my PC when I expand an attached thumbnail image, the row of thumbnails along the bottom of the screen hides the x axis scale. In case anyone has the same problem, the x axis scale is one hour per division from midnight to midnight on each of Voltage graphs. The x axis scale is one second per division on each of the Cranking Voltage graphs. The x axis scale is one minute per division on the graph in the last image (14.25V inside a blue circle). [/edit]

Except for when the Outback was driven on 22-Apr-2020, the doors had been locked & both remote fobs kept out of range. The battery had been 80%+ charged with a CTEK MXS 7.0 charger six days prior to the 22-Apr-2020.

The Bluetooth range on the Samsung Tab S4 & Century BM12V combination is that good I don’t even have to go into the garage to see what the battery voltage is or has been at any stage. :cool:

(1)_2019-OB-3.6R_BM12V_Volts_22-Apr-2020.jpg (2)_2019-OB-3.6R_BM12V_Volts_23-Apr-2020.jpg (3)_2019-OB-3.6R_BM12V_Volts_24-April-2020.jpg
(1) Volts 22-Apr-2020. (2) Volts 23-Apr-2020. (3) Volts 24-April-2020.
(4)_2019-OB-3.6R_BM12V_Cranking-Volts-cold_22-Apr-2020.jpg (5)_2019-OB-3.6R_BM12V_Cranking-Volts-warm_22-Apr-2020.jpg (6)_2019-OB-3.6R_BM12V_Cranking-Volts-cold_24-Apr-2020.jpg (7)_2019-OB-3.6R_BM12V_Voltage-screen.jpg
(4) Cranking Volts cold 22-Apr-2020. (5) Cranking Volts warm 22-Apr-2020. (6) Cranking Volts cold 24-Apr-2020.
 

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Unfortunately I had to terminate this particular test because my better half had to go out in the Outback. I would have liked the test to run at least another day to see if the battery voltage was going to settle at ~12.62V.

I’ve attached screen captures (click to enlarge) taken on my Samsung Tab S4 from the Century BM12V of the relevant voltage details over a 55 hour period (22-Apr-2020, 23-Apr-2020 & 24-Apr-2020 on three consecutive screens), plus cold & warm engine cranking Voltage results. I’ve added comments in red text. The screen capture showing 14.25V inside a blue circle was just after starting the engine cold on the 24-Apr-2020.

Except for when the Outback was driven on 22-Apr-20, the doors had been locked & both remote fobs kept out of range. The battery had been 80%+ charged with a CTEK MXS 7.0 charger six days prior to the 22-Apr-2020.

The Bluetooth range on the Samsung Tab S4 & Century BM12V combination is that good I don’t even have to go into the garage to see what the battery voltage is or has been at any stage. :cool:

View attachment 482988 View attachment 482989 View attachment 482990
(1) Volts 22-Apr-2020. (2) Volts 23-Apr-2020. (3) Volts 24-April-2020.
View attachment 482991 View attachment 482992 View attachment 482993 View attachment 482994
(4) Cranking Volts cold 22-Apr-2020. (5) Cranking Volts warm 22-Apr-2020. (6) Cranking Volts cold 24-Apr-2020.
Your battery and charging system looks to be performing very well. Is there any reason to suspect that if you ran the test a few more days, a battery could start self-discharging more rapidly?
 

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Is there any reason to suspect that if you ran the test a few more days, a battery could start self-discharging more rapidly?
No, except of course when it gets near the end of its Ah capacity.

But even a battery that is disconnected will slowly lose its charge. Our previous gen6 2016 Liberty (Legacy) 3.6R had the exact same battery brand & type as in our current Outback. My records for that Liberty shows that prior to flying overseas on a five week holiday I disconnected the battery, gave it an overnight charge with the CTEK MXS 7.0 charger (charged to 80%+), & left it disconnected until we got home five weeks later. I measured the battery voltage before re-connecting & it measured 12.52V. That battery was less than two years old.

The longest I have left the Liberty in our garage without being driven with the battery still connected was for a three week period while we were away on holidays. It started without any issue when we got back.

The only issue I have had with a battery in a Subaru while not being driven was with our previous SJ Foz XTP which had a smaller battery (48Ah CCA 390A) than our Liberty & Outback. After a three week holiday with the XT sitting in the garage while we were away I came home to find the battery flat (measured only 1.77V). I put this down to leaving my OBDLink LX Bluetooth OBD2 adaptor (used for Torque Pro & ActiveOBD) plugged into the OBD2 port. I assumed the OBDLink LX adaptor didn’t go to sleep & kept communicating with the vehicle. After that, my golden rule is don’t leave anything plugged into the OBD2 port if the vehicle isn’t being driven for a while.

At the moment I’m running a test with one of the remote fobs sitting beside the Outback communicating with it to see how the Voltage trend compares, but I expect that to be terminated due to the vehicle needing to be used for essential use.

Not only does the Century BM12V tell me what’s going on with the Outback’s battery & charging system, it also shows me that the CTEK MXS 7.0 charger is doing the right thing (not that I had any doubts, I treat CTEK as the benchmark of smart chargers).
 

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Is there an easy check to see if the keys are within battery draining range?
If by battery drainage range you mean fob communication range, then yes there is.

To check if the fob is within communication range (different to operating range) of the vehicle; After locking the doors, for the next 10 minutes the LED on the fob will flash at a rate of once every 3 seconds if close to the vehicle. After 10 minutes the vehicle enters the power saving mode to protect the battery in the vehicle & the battery in the fob (the LED on the remote indicates this by stopping flashing). During this 10 minute period move away from the vehicle until the LED on the remote stops flashing, the fob will now be out of communication range (but make sure the 10 minute period hasn’t expired).

To check if the fob is out of operating range; keep moving away from the vehicle while locking & unlocking the doors with the fob until it no longer locks or unlocks the doors. I can lock & unlock the doors of our Outback in the attached garage from anywhere in our house, & it isn’t a small house.

I doubt that the fob being within communication range has much impact, if any at all, on the discharge rate of the vehicle battery. With the doors locked & the fob within range, my voltage measurements over a few days aren’t showing a worse battery discharge rate than with the doors locked & the fob out of range (after the above 10 minute period). I’ve yet to do current measurements to confirm any difference.

I haven’t yet tested the above with the doors unlocked except for the fact that the above 10 minute communication period doesn’t apply.

[edit] Corrected operating range to communication range & added a paragraph about operating range. [/edit]
 

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I would agree that it might be largely on factory fresh cars. When I first started test driving Outbacks, 2 of the 4 on the lot that they took out for me needed a jump. I've seen this before when shopping for other brands. I'm not convinced this is a bad battery issue as much as an initial condition charge coupled with months of sitting during transit and dealership storage. I think new user things like storeing the keys in the car, leaving interior lights on , etc are surely a large portion of the reports as well.

FWIW, I was initially concerned with all the reported dead battery reports but have had no issues myself ( even after leaving the hatch open for 18 hrs). Of course, I havn't let the car sit for more than a day or so without running it. Especially in these times, a regular drive to nowhere in my new OB does my mind good.
2020 Outback Limited Purchased new April 20, 2020 Dead Battery April 23, 2020

It is either the battery or computer or just a lemon of a new car!!
Drove new car home Monday night, drove it about 10 miles on Tuesday, parked in garage nothing left on and FOB at least 50 ft away, new car would not start on Thursday April 23rd and has been at dealership ever since. Dealer said "it needs a new Remote Sending Unit" they kept car, replaced it and it did not start the next day at the dealership. So dealership is keeping car and Monday May 4th 2020 will have to contact Subaru Tech support!!

SO YES there are issues with the New 2020 OUTBACK LIMITED that the Subaru Dealership mechanics can NOT figure out and have to contact Subaru USA. TOTAL FRUSTRATION
 

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2020 Outback Limited Purchased new April 20, 2020 Dead Battery April 23, 2020

It is either the battery or computer or just a lemon of a new car!!
Drove new car home Monday night, drove it about 10 miles on Tuesday, parked in garage nothing left on and FOB at least 50 ft away, new car would not start on Thursday April 23rd and has been at dealership ever since. Dealer said "it needs a new Remote Sending Unit" they kept car, replaced it and it did not start the next day at the dealership. So dealership is keeping car and Monday May 4th 2020 will have to contact Subaru Tech support!!

SO YES there are issues with the New 2020 OUTBACK LIMITED that the Subaru Dealership mechanics can NOT figure out and have to contact Subaru USA. TOTAL FRUSTRATION
Totally sucks. Questions and suggestions in order, i.e., try #3 in house before moving on to #4.
  1. Did they give you a free loaner?
  2. Keep meticulous records because the clock is ticking in terms of lemon law; hopefully it won't come to that, but just in case.
  3. Talk to the GM at the dealership and nicely ask for another car.
  4. Talk to SOA and nicely explain your disappointment. They can help with putting you in a new car, or as a minimum offer you a free extended warranty to restore your confidence in the brand.
  5. Above all, be nice to everyone you deal with. We have been through this process with Honda and Subaru and they both are very supportive and interested in happy and loyal customers, especially the ones who are nice and not nasty. Cars are just machines, people have relationships and feelings. They would much rather have a customer who has worked through an issue with a positive outcome than one who goes away frustrated.
 

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$10, problem solved (2 fobs), for in-house, or left in-car: Amazon.com: Mini Faraday Bag for Key Fob (2 Pack), TICONN Faraday Cage Car Key Protector - RFID Signal Blocking, Anti-Theft Pouch, Anti-Hacking Case Blocker (Carbon Fiber Texture): Automotive
I have one of these in my console, for when I want to leave the fob in the car (although now I about the super-cool-fob-disable process, thanks @Kevin ), and the 2nd one is used to store my backup key, in the house (I got these right after purchase, figured I didn't want to even think about someone being able to get into my car, because I maybe left the fob too close, in the house or otherwise).

My car hasn't been started in two weeks (wife works in health-care, so she's been having to be in-office part of the time, so she grabs groceries on the way home), and it was fine today, when I went out to hook up the charger
I logged 575 miles on my road-bike last month, and 75mi on my car. That's a silver-lining the cycling's been great, roads feel safer than in many, many years (riding solo, that part's getting old, but there are worse problems...) ;-]
Lol no kidding.
The outback stays in the garage a lot lately, much more biking though.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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Totally sucks. Questions and suggestions in order, i.e., try #3 in house before moving on to #4.
  1. Did they give you a free loaner?
  2. Keep meticulous records because the clock is ticking in terms of lemon law; hopefully it won't come to that, but just in case.
  3. Talk to the GM at the dealership and nicely ask for another car.
  4. Talk to SOA and nicely explain your disappointment. They can help with putting you in a new car, or as a minimum offer you a free extended warranty to restore your confidence in the brand.
  5. Above all, be nice to everyone you deal with. We have been through this process with Honda and Subaru and they both are very supportive and interested in happy and loyal customers, especially the ones who are nice and not nasty. Cars are just machines, people have relationships and feelings. They would much rather have a customer who has worked through an issue with a positive outcome than one who goes away frustrated.
Good suggestions, but I don’t know why there is an emphasis on being nice. OK, be nice to start, but sometimes being nice does not work. And the dude just dropped $35k for a pain in the ass.
 

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Stuff happens. The only time I get upset is when a place isn't trying to make it right.

Take this high pitched fan rattle I noticed a week into my last Nissan. Dealership said turn the radio higher.
 
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