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Other people who have had dead batteries had good luck after Subaru switched it to a new higher CCA stock EFB battery.

 

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2020 Outback Onyx Edition XT
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25 Posts
Could someone tell me how to show the Voltage factory mode display ? All I seem to find is Oil Temperature and Water Temperature at the top of the infotainment display.
 

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2020 Outback Limited
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357 Posts
Just checked my 3/20 build, I have the 620 CCA battery. Only had car since Saturday so don't know if battery issues will plague me yet or not.
 

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Just checked my 3/20 build, I have the 620 CCA battery. Only had car since Saturday so don't know if battery issues will plague me yet or not.
I still have the original 620 CCA battery from an August 2019 build and while I was initially paranoid that it would fail, it's been fine so far. Out of an abundance of caution it's been recharged a couple times with an external CTEK charger. My guess is that some vehicles had batteries that were allowed to discharge to the point where it was no longer healthy when sold - the batteries can no longer hold a charge.

Aside from our specific battery issues, every brand seems to have a certain amount of battery failures. Not sure if it's manufacturing defects, or simply battery chemistry and what happens when a dealer lets a battery get too low.
 

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2020 Outback Limited
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I still have the original 620 CCA battery from an August 2019 build and while I was initially paranoid that it would fail, it's been fine so far. Out of an abundance of caution it's been recharged a couple times with an external CTEK charger. My guess is that some vehicles had batteries that were allowed to discharge to the point where it was no longer healthy when sold - the batteries can no longer hold a charge.

Aside from our specific battery issues, every brand seems to have a certain amount of battery failures. Not sure if it's manufacturing defects, or simply battery chemistry and what happens when a dealer lets a battery get too low.
Yeah. Out of the 10s of thousands of these things they've sold, if it had widespread battery issues I'd think we'd be hearing more about it. Sucks if yours dies, but doesn't seem like it's a very common issue.
 

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I still have the original 620 CCA battery from an August 2019 build and while I was initially paranoid that it would fail, it's been fine so far. Out of an abundance of caution it's been recharged a couple times with an external CTEK charger. My guess is that some vehicles had batteries that were allowed to discharge to the point where it was no longer healthy when sold - the batteries can no longer hold a charge.

Aside from our specific battery issues, every brand seems to have a certain amount of battery failures. Not sure if it's manufacturing defects, or simply battery chemistry and what happens when a dealer lets a battery get too low.
I live in a cold climate too and the Outback has been sitting on the dealer lot for months. I hope it's just a bad battery but these class action lawsuits have me concerned. I just hope it's not a parasitic battery drain that damages the battery.


and

 

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I live in a cold climate too and the Outback has been sitting on the dealer lot for months. I hope it's just a bad battery but these class action lawsuits have me concerned. I just hope it's not a parasitic battery drain that damages the battery.
Not to minimize the need for legitimate class action lawsuits, but lawyers who specialize in class action lawsuits will keep churning them out and many of them go nowhere.

There was an issue with the charging algorithm in the Gen5 outback that has since been taken care of with a TSB, but for our 2020's, the few people who have done actual measurements are seeing 14+ volts charging when the engine is running. That's not to say that there haven't been some people who have had parasitic drain issues, but it's apparently not widespread. In one case, the owner of a 2020 had a fob left in the car and it drained the engine battery because the car couldn't go to sleep with an active fob in it.
 

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2020 Outback Limited
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Out of paranoia I just checked my battery voltage with a voltmeter just now at 12.45v sitting in garage. I drove it earlier today but I'll keep an eye on it and see if it drains abnormally. At least I have one reference point for where it was 2 hours after last being driven...
 

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Not to minimize the need for legitimate class action lawsuits, but lawyers who specialize in class action lawsuits will keep churning them out and many of them go nowhere.

There was an issue with the charging algorithm in the Gen5 outback that has since been taken care of with a TSB, but for our 2020's, the few people who have done actual measurements are seeing 14+ volts charging when the engine is running. That's not to say that there haven't been some people who have had parasitic drain issues, but it's apparently not widespread. In one case, the owner of a 2020 had a fob left in the car and it drained the engine battery because the car couldn't go to sleep with an active fob in it.
Those class action lawsuit lawyers usually go on fishing expeditions for sure and consumers end up with a few bucks while the lawyers make millions. Hopefully, the dealership and/or Subaru will make this right.
 

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Out of paranoia I just checked my battery voltage with a voltmeter just now at 12.45v sitting in garage. I drove it earlier today but I'll keep an eye on it and see if it drains abnormally. At least I have one reference point for where it was 2 hours after last being driven...
That's a good idea and I'll keep an eye on mine when I get it back.
 

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I'm buying one of those portable jump starters too. Roadside assistance is nice but waiting an hour for someone to show up not so much.
 

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(Australian spec) 2019 MY19 Outback 3.6R CVT.
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... I just checked my battery voltage with a voltmeter just now at 12.45v sitting in garage. ...
12.45V is too low if you measured that after the car has been resting for about an hour (since opening then closing the rear hatch, having the infotainment unit on, or having the front doors open - these cause a considerable amount of current to be drawn from the battery & will drop the voltage for a short period).

Your battery voltage should be a minimum of 12.6V, but ideally a fair bit above that. I would suggest a good long run to charge the battery or put the battery on a good quality smart charger like a CTEK for a couple of days.
 

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(Australian spec) 2019 MY19 Outback 3.6R CVT.
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My guess is that some vehicles had batteries that were allowed to discharge to the point where it was no longer healthy when sold ...
That is what I’ve always suspected. Flatten or discharge a lead acid battery too much & some damage will be done to the battery.

Even if the battery hasn’t been flattened or discharged too much prior to the new owner taking delivery, the dealer should fully charge the battery before handing over the vehicle. Otherwise a new owner could get caught with a battery that is in a lower stage of charge than ideal if the vehicle doesn’t get driven much.

The early alternator charging algorithm in the early gen5 Outbacks & early gen6 Legacys was a problem, & the US did have some fairly small batteries in their vehicles, but once these were rectified there shouldn’t be a problem except for the above scenario. But the cold temperatures that some parts of the US & Canada experience is also a challenge for the battery.
 

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So, I'm joining the dead battery club. I traded in my '18 Crosstrek for a 2020 Outback two months ago and it was fine until about two weeks ago when it went dead. Since then I've had to jumpstart it four times and the battery was dead by the next morning. I did take it in to the dealer and they replaced the 620CCA battery today.
Question: I did switch out the puddle lights with the aftermarket Subaru Projector Lights (discussed elsewhere in this forum). I also replaced the dome and trunk lights with brighter LEDs. Could this have possibly been the cause for excessive battery draining? I'm assuming the puddle lights switch off when the doors are closed? Has anyone else who has done these simple modifications had any problems? Thanks!
 

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(Australian spec) 2019 MY19 Outback 3.6R CVT.
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Question: I did switch out the puddle lights with the aftermarket Subaru Projector Lights (discussed elsewhere in this forum). I also replaced the dome and trunk lights with brighter LEDs. Could this have possibly been the cause for excessive battery draining? I'm assuming the puddle lights switch off when the doors are closed? Has anyone else who has done these simple modifications had any problems? Thanks!
No. I haven't used the projector lights, but LEDs draw considerable less current then the equivalent factory fitted incandescent globes, therefore there is less drain on the battery.

The puddle lights should switch off as soon as the front doors close, you can check this by opening the driver’s door & operating the door switch to see if they switch off as soon as you press the door switch. Do the same with the passenger front door. That will prove the door switch operation. If the interior lights are timing out after the user pre-set time when the doors close (the default should be 30 seconds but it can be reduced) then the doors are operating the door switches correctly & the BCM is dimming & switching the interior lights off correctly (you may not see LEDs dim though).

Jump starting a battery won’t charge a battery up (well it will a bit but hardly at all), it will only supply current to allow the modules to control the start sequence & to supply the starter motor with enough current to turn the engine over & therefore start the car. After jump starting, the battery will need to be charged, either by driving the car a considerable distance or by charging it with a quality smart charger like a CTEK. Did you do this?

I would suggest monitoring the battery voltage with a voltmeter (if you don’t own one a reasonably cheap digital multimeter will do the job). Leave the bonnet unlatched & measure the voltage at night & again in the morning. See my earlier posted voltage graphs in this topic to get an idea how slow the battery voltage falls overnight. When you say “it was fine until about two weeks ago when it went dead”, how much was the Outback driven prior to this? Enough to keep the battery in a good state of charge?

You probably know this, but make sure the cargo hatch is closed, that can discharge a battery overnight if left open. Make sure the interior lights are off but with LEDs fitted that isn’t as much of a problem. But using the infotainment unit without the car running takes a considerable amount of current.

You can monitor the volts via the Factory Setting screen on the infotainment unit (which is good when you are driving), but when the vehicle isn't being driven it requires opening/closing the driver’s door. A voltmeter is better, or if you want to go the extra mile I can highly recommend a battery monitor similar to what I have posted about in earlier posts.
 

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2020 Outback Limited
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Just checked again this morning and it's around 12.42. HOWEVER, this is with a $2.99 Harbor Freight voltmeter. I actually have 3 of them. So I tried all 3

Voltmeter 1: 12.42v
Voltmeter 2: 12.61v
Voltmeter 3: 12.70v

So I guess moral of the story is a $2.99 voltmeter is adequate to get you in the ballpark, but obviously not terribly accurate. Based on the last 2 readings I am good :) Maybe I'll get a better voltmeter for S&G sometime.
 
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