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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Due to the well-known issues of rapid battery drain on our 2017 OB, we want/need to buy a portable battery jumper. I'm looking at Duracell 1100 Peak Amp Powerpack Pro Jump Starter Pack, listed for $199 at AutoZone. We like all the additional features it provides, but I'm just wondering if anyone can recommend it, or if we need to be looking at something else (ie. another brand, more or less amps). Although we'd prefer to pay less rather than more, our main interest is being able to keep our car running until we figure how the heck to deal with the battery drain issue. We've had to call roadside assistance 4 or 5 times within the last month or so, and added to having just relocated to a new city, the stress of dealing with both issues is becoming unmanageable!

Not looking for battery drain info; I've already found the specific thread on that. Just would like a recommendation for the battery jumper. FYI, we are also replacing the battery on the car with (hopefully) a better battery (Optima Red Top Battery, Group Size 25, 720 CCA).

Thanks for anyone's quick response!
 

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Would not get that one from AutoZone. I have the topvision 2000A and have used it a few times and it works great. Got the recommendation from a guy on YouTube who does very good reviews by actually testing them.


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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Would not get that one from AutoZone. I have the topvision 2000A and have used it a few times and it works great. Got the recommendation from a guy on YouTube who does very good reviews by actually testing them.


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Thanks for the info, but we need the jumper TODAY. As I said, we're at the end of our rope on this dead battery situation, and need to get the car up and running as reliably as possible for at least the short term, or until we can get the problem totally resolved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Noco GB40 is great. Have two, one in each car. But now that I’ve changed the battery to a larger capacity group at Costco, I haven’t had to jump start even when having the car sit for two months outside.
Which battery did you buy? I'm not sure what "larger capacity group" means. I'm not totally mechanically inclined (nor is my husband), but I'm trying to get myself up to speed to figure our unreliable car situation out. :unsure:
 

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2020 White Limited Hybrid
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I have the Norco but haven't needed it yet.

It's been used twice, once for my son't car and once a guy on the highway - purty slick they be
 
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Well, the Duracell unit is large. It has a small tire inflator on it… I haven’t ever found those useful, but if you don’t have an inflator they’re better than nothing.

its heavy. 21lbs. It’s a small 12 volt sealed Lead acid battery inside. It natively runs at 12 V, which is nice, a lot of these other jump starters that are lithium ion are running at just over 7 V when they’re cranking.

I prefer the sealed lead acid types, they don’t have the problems that the lithium ion packs have when they’re left in a hot car, it’s basically a small AGM battery like you to use on a UPS device, or maybe a small electric vehicle like a golf cart. Running at 12 V native it’s going to certainly crank over your car very easily. it’s basically a small AGM battery like you to use on a UPS device, or maybe a small electric vehicle like a golf cart. Running at 12 V native it’s going to certainly crank over your car very easily.

i’ve used that type in the past, even loaned it out to a friend who is too lazy to replace his battery and use that pack to jumpstart his car every day to and from work. After a few months he eventually bought a new battery. That pack would go about 30 jumps before it needed to be recharged. It got heavy use and was great. When the batteries go out in them, you can have the battery replaced. mine lasted about 7 years. Before the battery would not hold a charge anymore.

I just replaced the battery in one a friend of mine has,I think he has more sentimental attachment to it because it went through all kinds of adventures all through Utah in the Southwest. His unit is older, he bought it probably around 2005.

The battery cable connections and clamps always seemed a lot more sturdy and better quality than some of these lithium jump starters. A lot of the lithium jump starters all use the same clamps may buy some third-party company. Companies like Noco may make their own, but a lot of them do not. If the unit gets used a lot, you will certainly appreciate the better quality cable and clamp.

The cables can be a bit short on those units, so it’s not always the easiest to position the jump starter on top of the battery with clamps connected. The good thing about that is it keeps the cables from heating up too much if you’re cranking the car lot with the unit attached. The bad thing is, it’s a somewhat large unit, and not as easy to place around the battery the way a smaller lithium ion unit might be.

Works perfectly well, just might want to practice once or twice attaching the clamps and where you would put the jump starter when you need to use it.

the biggest downside to that Duracell one is the size. It’s not as portable/stowable. The version I used to have was easy enough to lash down somewhere out of the way.

The only problems I’ve seen with some of those, is the wiring for the switch to turn it on and off. Some of those wires and connections are kind of small and they can come loose. I’ve never had a problem taking one apart and re-attaching a wire or soldering a new lead on one if needed. Usually that failure will happen pretty early on in its use. And it’s not that common. Those problems can be repaired, if you’re not afraid to take the case apart. It’s a type of repair you can perform on those units that you really can’t perform on some of these other lithium jump starters. A little more difficult to repair or Nocco unit for example.

bottom line, if you have to get one today, and don’t mind the large size for having it sitting in the back of the car, Want something you can charge up and leave in a hot car and not worry about it,it’s a decent choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That is really helpful information - thanks so much for sharing. Yeah, we need something ASAP. We're replacing the battery today, so the jumper may not be an absolute necessity, but this car is basically our only (semi-reliable) means of transportation. Going out every morning for work, my husband really needs it to start, and to not have to call roadside assistance. There isn't anyone around to help us on a regular basis, so we're on our own at the moment.

Again, thanks for the detailed information!:)
 

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All that being said, I do use a lithium ion one now - Weego brand. I’ve not had the lithium ion ones last as long, but right now I need a smaller size and portability.

I always have jumper cables in the car, those are easy and require little to no maintenance. Only need another car.
 

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All that being said, I do use a lithium ion one now - Weego brand. I’ve not had the lithium ion ones last as long, but right now I need a smaller size and portability.

I always have jumper cables in the car, those are easy and require little to no maintenance. Only need another car.
Be careful using jumper cables on modern cars. It may be an Internet rumor, but I've read that modern car electrical systems can react badly to jumper cables. The new lithium battery packs have electronics to prevent frying the cars electronic systems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
We have the jumper cables covered, too. We'll be working on "the other car" soon, I hope. This is our first Subaru; not sure yet if it'll be our last. Seems a lot of the newer cars have so much technology that the same problem we're having could crop up on new makes/models.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Okay, I'm confused now. I read the description of the lithium battery starters, and saw that feature; so, should we be looking at a lithium instead of regular? Pretty sure my husband knows how to jump a car properly, so I think we'll be okay. I need to learn the proper way, though, so I can do it if he's not around. I used to know but jumping a car only once or twice in literally decades means I need a refresher course.
 

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Just my 2 bits, but I'd just replace the stock Subaru Group 25 battery (if you haven't already) with a Group 24 or 34 800 CCA normal (lead acid) battery and carry the jumper cables.
 
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Be careful using jumper cables on modern cars. It may be an Internet rumor, but I've read that modern car electrical systems can react badly to jumper cables. The new lithium battery packs have electronics to prevent frying the cars electronic systems.
That Duracell unit has that reverse polarity protection, over voltage protections. Two year warranty… my weego jump starter was only an 18 month warranty.
 

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2014 Outback 3.6R Limited, HK audio, no nav.
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I know you can't get this today, but this is what we bought and had to use it twice as our last battery 'gasped 'n' died'. We also have a vampire drain problem, and got this via Amazon to have just in case, only to have to use it twice less than a month later:
LOFTEK Portable Car Battery Jump Starter (Up to 7.0L Gas or 5.5L Diesel Engine), 12V Power Pack Auto Battery Booster with Built-in LED Light, Red
 

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20 Outback Premium; former 19 Outback Premium, 85 GL Wagon, 87 GL-10 Wagon
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If your tailgate release is mechanical and works with a dead battery, Hulkman is the best and easiest to use, but it's too thick to fit under the seat. If you can't get into the back with a dead battery, then get the biggest lithium jump starter that will fit under the seat.
 

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2012 OB Limited 3.6Rrrrr
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@betsy - please share what you ended up doing?

Per what everyone here suggested + my own 2 farlings...
1. replace battery with East Penn-made group 24 or 34 800CC lead-acid battery
2. look at what is ranked here... again IMHO, the NOCO is excellent, I've three myself & sons each have one
Hands-On Review: Best Jump Starters for Emergency Starts and Portable Charging
3. also, if plan on parking any "extended" time, might also look at "battery tender"; I've two of these from NOCO "Genius10",,,
Automotive lighting Tool Font Automotive exterior Automotive tire
 

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I have a Noco genius 1100 that has kept an Optima battery in top condition in a race car we bought for our son in 2017. I've been wanting a portable jumper since my really old Energizer died. I scored a Noco GBX55 on cyber Monday for about $120. Can't go wrong with Noco.
 

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Outback 2011 3.6R Premium (sold Jan 22)
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Once you purchase and install the optima red top 720cca battery you will not need a jump pack (unless you leave the light on in the luggage compartment).

The jump pack will probably sit in the vehicle for many months and be discharged when you do need to use it 😉

Seagrass
 

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I have had a NOCO in my car since 2014 when I drove a Jeep Wrangler that I traded in for my 2016 OB. Never needed it in 85K miles that I drove the 2016. Traded that in for a new 2019 OB and stored the NOCO in that car. To date, I have only used the NOCO once to jump my neighbors Subaru Forrester when she left her cargo light on. It worked perfectly. I recharge it every six months when I also change out the batteries in my flashlights and headlamps that I keep in my “get-home” bag that I keep in my OB. Since we do the spring forward, fall back time change, that triggers my change battery thing and recharge activity twice a year. Smoke detectors too. The gear in my get-home bag changes with the winter/summer season anyway so our time change thing works as a good trigger to get stuff done.


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