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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I picked up my 2018 Outback Premium last week. I'm hearing bad things about the stock tires. I mainly drive highways but do plenty of camping and light off road adventures and occasional driving in snow as well. What would be a beefier tire that could handle these situations well? Would you recommend getting new wheels for it? I've been reading about 17" Method wheels with All-Terrain tires. How much does that affect mileage and road noise? What tires have you switched to on the latest generation Outback? Thanks!
 

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2016 Outback 2.5
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642 Posts
There are several threads on here about the YOKOHAMA Geolander GO15 A/T's. I just bought a set myself based on the user reviews.

My use is similar to yours.

I haven't had them long enough to form an opinion, other than the road noise isn't bad. I was a little worried about that.
 

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2005 Outback Wagon 3.0 L.L. Bean
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1,023 Posts
andsand2.
Please update your geographic location in your profile.
It will assist forum members in the ideal tire selection based on your climate.
You mentioned occasional snow.
You may wish to consider some All Weather tires. I do not mean All Season tires which we are all familiar with.
Whatever you decide, make sure to get XL (extra load) rated tires. They are more robust and durable.
 

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2017 Outback 2.5i
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96 Posts
Take a look at the Continental TerrainContact ATs. New tire on the market, first AT from Continental. 3 years in the making and over 2 million miles of testing. It's supposed to be a good road biased AT tire that'll treat you well on the road(quiet, smooth) while still being able to take off road.

I don't have these tires yet but I did look into them. Reviews seem good. Firestone Destination ATs are good to. IMO BFG TA K02s are way too expensive.
 
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Tire & Wheel Specialists
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950 Posts
Hi,
I picked up my 2018 Outback Premium last week. I'm hearing bad things about the stock tires. I mainly drive highways but do plenty of camping and light off road adventures and occasional driving in snow as well. What would be a beefier tire that could handle these situations well? Would you recommend getting new wheels for it? I've been reading about 17" Method wheels with All-Terrain tires. How much does that affect mileage and road noise? What tires have you switched to on the latest generation Outback? Thanks!
You could go with 17 inch Method MR502 or MR501 Rally wheels and Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015 225/65R-17 tires. This is a good off-road tire that is also snow flake approved for severe winter conditions. These tires ride very quiet and smooth. They should not have much effect on mileage. I have been running them for a couple of years and love them.

Here is a link to them online:

Geolandar A/T G015 225/65R-17 tires | Discount Tire Direct

Method Rally Wheels | Discount Tire Direct

Please let us know if you would like a quote.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all of your suggestions and expertise! I'm in Oregon so wet traction is definitely important too :) I think something like the Sparco Terra would be better suited to my wallet. It seems both these and the Methods are similar to the stock wheels in weight?
 

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Long story short:

Yokohama Geolander, Michelin A/S or Pirelli P4. Yoko because they are highly recommended (including above) and the least expensive. Michelin A/S, same reasons but pricier. Pirelli because that is what I now drive on as they were out of my first two choices. I really wanted the Geo's.

Long story:

I have a 2011 OB with 85K miles on it. I drove other cars while my wife drove the OB to about 70K miles. We then switched cars about one and a half years ago. She drives the '14 Sierra A/T (crap Goodyear tires) and I was horrified by the Bridgestone tires (with 30k miles on them).

Since she didn't complain and I didn't know, I replaced the OEM Bridgestones after 40K miles with the same OEM Bridgestones. I then put 10K miles on them and I just could not believe how bad they were. I felt like I put my family in danger. I also own a Honda Accord and rarely drove the OB, except for family vacations (and got the crappy front passenger seat complaint every 10 minutes).

Anyway, I NEEDED tires with an impending snow storm. Only thing Mavis had in stock that I would accept were the Pirelli p4 all season plus. (Mavis is real close to our home and they always give me a huge break on tires and brakes and do my car fast because I've been going there for 20 years).

My wife was stunned when recently she drove it. Her comment was it drove better than the day we bought it. She's right. Straight as an arrow, no rattles and real tires. If the Geo and Michelins are that much better, then good for those that own them. These are great, especially as a 3rd choice in a desperate situation.

Do as much research as possible but lose those tires because you basically live in a rain forest, the sooner the better. They aren't even remotely as good as the above alternatives. I'm probably the 100,000th person to complain about these tires. They flat out suck.

Been a member since 2010 and this is my first post. Next post will be about the crappy front passenger seat as they've fixed the other shortcomings (CVT noise, low beams and oil leak). But 4 way/no lumbar is a serious shortcoming, especially in the top of the line model.

Good luck with the car, I love mine (as long as I'm driving) even with the shortcomings.
 

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2018 3.6R Limited - Magnetite - LP Adventure lift
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508 Posts
Im looking at the following

Continental terrain contact

Yokohama Geolandar AT

Falken Wildpeak AT3
 

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Rain

I'd buy whatever was rated best in the rain. As a retired police officer, I can look back at my monthly reports (since thrown out) and could tell you what days it rained, Always a 3 to 6 in the PAR box (Police Accident Report). Blank or the occasional 1 on other days. It's unbelievable how people drive in the rain. In the snow, outside of the idiots who think 4X4 means ice isn't an issue, most people drive with caution. I refuse to drive in the rain if at all possible.

Only AWD owners know the plus of AWD when you hit a puddle going too fast. FWD cars snow plow and RWD cars kick out in the rear. At least with a RWD car you have a shot at steering out. I'll never own either again (when I sell the Accord). The OB has a small learning curve in conditions but it's almost idiot proof. Almost.

Ratings are relative, biased, false and sometimes true. All 3 you listed are rated from 'eh' to great, depending where you look. Same goes with the tires I bought. All I know, is I have two houses. One has a dirt road with a 1000 ft dirt driveway (plowed to 3 inches). The OB handles both way better than the truck with the new tires. At out real house, it's a paved 600 ft driveway going up from zero to maybe 25 degrees and again, the OB handles it better. It's the crap Goodyear stock tires on the truck, which are getting changed soon. No more winters on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks again for all the great insight. I?ve read some negative things about the Duellers in the wet. I like what I?m hearing about the Pirellis. A/T might not be worth the trade-off in road noise considering the amount of light off-roading I do. Any opinions on Sparco vs Method wheels? Sparco is a bit more in my price range and seem to be top rated in Europe?
 

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2018 Outback 2.5i, Premium w/Eyesight Vision
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Picking up a 2018 Premium 2.5i today and wondering about the stock tires and if I should plan on an immediate swap for the Geolandar's. Live in Denver but have a place up by Mt. Antero. Dirt road to cabin which frequently has snow/ice.

Want something that will do well on roads at speed, majority of drive to cabin is 65 MPH and give good dirt and snow traffic. Would love something that has some off-road capabilities for when we go to some of the trailheads on 4x4 trails.

Will the stock tires get me through the snow capably or am I looking at buying new tires ASAP?
 

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377 Posts
Im looking at the following

Continental terrain contact

Yokohama Geolandar AT

Falken Wildpeak AT3


Any thoughts on tire diameter of the newer Conti Terrain 27.6 (225/60-17) vs the stock Bridgestone duelers at 28.5? (225/65-17) I guess the engine will turn higher rpm at a given speed? Lower mpg's? Don't know.
 

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2015 Outback 2.5i
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137 Posts
I have been using Hankook Dynapro's and have been very happy with them. Great in snow, ice and rain. Also these were extremely well priced with a $100 rebate from TireRack.

Erik
 

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2017 Outback Touring
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11 Posts
Better tires

I have had my '17 for a year and a half now and I really have the OEMs. So I just had Vredrestein Quatrac 5s installed on my car. So far so good. I am almost at 500 miles on them and have already noticed that they are quieter, the MPGs are improving and more comfortable ride. Of course we seem to be having a dry spell (Oregon) so I don't know about rain nor snow yet. We keep everyone posted. Oh and they also did not break my wallet. Got some long trips in the near future so we have more to say after them.
 

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2017 Outback Touring
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11 Posts
I found the Duellers to be horrible in the snow. Even light snow.
 

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Nokian WRG3....By far the most sure footed all season tire out there I have used. They have the winter snowflake certification and I get 50k miles out of them all year round in Northeast driving.

Best tire cost vs. performance is the General Altimax RT43. As my cars get higher mileage and I know I am putting the "last" set of new tires on I switch to the Altimax.

When my Outback was new I found a second set of wheels and mounted the Nokians. I used the stock tires in the summer and the Nokians in the winter. I got over 90k miles between the 2 and would have easily gotten to 110k miles but we hit a pothole and blew out one of the Nokian's about a month ago. There was too much difference in tread depth to buy just one tire so I had to get 4 new ones (Altimax as car has almost 100k miles).

I have run Nokians on the following cars and have found them unstoppable in the snow and fantastic in the rain and dry:

2013 Outback
2007 Volvo XC70
2001 Saab 9-5
1997 Mercedes S500
2001 Audi A8

I am currently running the General Altimax on:
2001 Honda Accord
2007 Volvo XC70
2013 Outback
 

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2007 2.5 L Obsidian Black Outback XTL
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602 Posts
I had Pirelli P0's on an Italian sports car and they were fantastic for dry pavement and the car could corner to the point where you would be smacking your head against the side window. They were not so good on the snow and wore out very quickly. The rubber was very soft and at the point where if you drove over gravel the little stuff would stick to the tires. They only lasted almost two years and wore out by 20,000 miles.

I have been following this thread because of my desire to lessen the dry stopping distance, very good rain performance and not horrible on snow.

In stopping part of the equation for what works is related to the brake pads/hydraulics/hoses but what seems to make the most difference is where "the rubber meets the road" in surface area, tread and rubber composition (hardness). The Duelers are a narrow tire and I know that has an advantage of providing better fuel economy.

Has anyone done comparative measurements of how different brands of tires affect stopping distances?
 
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