Subaru Outback Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of October's Outback of the Month Challenge!
1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have decided to buy a 2013 Outback 2.5LTi. I have looked around the forums a bit and see that there are a wide variety of ways people here buy there cars, and there really weren't any recent threads that compared the methods. Is there a general consensus of the best way to go (ie Costco, IMBA VIP, email several dealers)? Many thanks.
 

·
Registered
'13 2.5Ltd w/EyeSight ::::: '02 2.5Ltd AT
Joined
·
95 Posts
The dealer with the car on his lot can usually offer the best price. Have you checked dealer inventory in your area to see if anyone has the car trimmed with the goodies you want?
 

·
Registered
2017 Outback, 14 Jeep Grand Cherokee, 07 BMW E-93
Joined
·
604 Posts
By far the lowest prices I have seen is to canvas the dealers in your surrounding area for best price and then show them the best price you received and see if they wish to match or better the price.
Unless you have a long term repore' with your dealer I don't think anything else touches this method which is what I learned from the 2013 Offical Outback thread...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
238 Posts
From time to time I do buy cars for our small fleet when another old worn out beater goes out of service.
Your emotional and psychological condition is very important. Dealers pray on emotionally unstable consumers.
The best approach that worked to my advantage includes following:
1. Research all the related information about your soon to be purchased car. All things related to its pricing, utility, reliability, longevity, cost of ownership, manufacturing rebates for the dealer and consumers, e.t.c. Make sure that this particular car model will fit your user profile at least 80% for all your imaginable use cases. This later will help you to avoid buyer's remorse.
2. Go through a couple of dealerships to get a sense how your selected model is being sold - consumer demand, overstocking and so on. Send few emails with a request for a quote. Be straight and honest with the dealers. Let them sense that you are not a dumb, desperate and financially challenged brainless consumer. That a car is just another commodity for you without any emotional attachment.
3. Make trading in your old car a separate deal irrespective of purchasing a new car. Do not conflate these two things together.
5. Do not test drive car right before the negotiation. Most of the people can develop that emotional personal attachment which dealers try to exploit to their advantage. Tell them that you know how that car looks on the inside and drives. So what, it's just another piece of four-wheeled metal.
4. During the negotiation stage present your research material on dealer invoice price, hold back from the manufacturer, other dealer perks, floor plan, other deal quotes and so on. Calculate potential dealer's profit right in front of him/her. Ask a straight question, what makes that bloodsucker think that he/she deserves more than 2% of the healthy profit. Negotiate without mentioning any additional consumer rebates and Costco auto programs. If he/she starts telling you a violin story about his/her hungry kids, ask for a tissue and cry along or advise him/her to find a real job.
5. After you settled on the comfortable to you price and options, during the payment or deposit stage give to the dealer that Costco Auto rebate form to fill out or any other rebates, and get in writing the car final price minus those rebates. This will prevent the dealer from factoring in these extra money to his/her advantage. At this moment the dealer is psychologically locked to close the deal and extra milking of a few hundred dollars will not destroy it. If he/she starts crying again, ask for a tissue and cry along or say that you did not negotiate hard enough.
6. If you buy your car using debt money (loan) I cannot advise how you should be begging your bank or credit union for it. But it's not a good idea to do it through the dealership. If you buy using cash, then before you go to the stealership register with your county an entity (trust, corporation or LLC) which will own the car. Separate yourself from the ownership. When you sign purchasing papers/contract, give their financial dept. the name of that entity and registry number for their whatever reporting purposes. Do not give them your private information, especially SSN. Demand that the MSO to be given directly to you, so you will be doing all the titling without any dealership strings attached.
7. Drive off happily in the new car or wait patiently for a factory ordered one.
 

·
Registered
2011 OB 2.5i Prem CVT HK/AWP, Ruby Red Pearl
Joined
·
3,321 Posts
OP.<O:p</O:p
Learn MSRP/Invoice.<O:p</O:p
Search the inventory (~2xx OBs), give your specs/options, no need for Costo et-al (you’ll get that walking in), shoot an email to Hueberger Subaru Colorado Springs.<O:p</O:p
Happy hunting.<O:p</O:p
 

·
Registered
2005 Outback XT Ltd
Joined
·
162 Posts
My father has been in the car business for over 30 years. When i buy a new car i pay dealer cost + delivery fee. Rarely do i need to drop his name, I have saved friends 1000s by doing this, and you won't believe how easy it is.

Call the dealership closest to you that has the car you want.
Ask for the Fleet Manager.
Tell him, "I know the exact car i want, i don't want to deal with the BS, what can you do for me?"

Generally these guys, if they are the real fleet manager, will not BS or play games with you, they move a lot of cars and don't have time for it.
See what kind of price you get. This has worked for several people i have had try this online as well as the RL friends and family. I dont even need my father anymore.

I highly recommend not getting a loan thru ANY dealership unless its one of those 0% financing deals. Try to go thru a credit union. If you arent a member of one, have a friend or family member that is get you set up, often times its just a sponsor fee of like 10 bucks. When you get approved for your loan and you can tell the dealer you have been approved for the car and will bring them a cashier's check it will allow them to move the car.

The way you run into trouble is if the dealer has limited stock and their inventory is precious to them. If there are any powerhouse dealerships around you, that's the way to go.
My last car was a 2007 civic. I paid 15.9 for it before taxes
Sold it 5 years and 70k later for 13.9 and got my outback.
Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,818 Posts
I bought mine through the IMBA VIP program.
Very pleased with the process.
Try to keep it simple and avoid trading in. Have financing arranged before you go and do not buy high pressure finance manager add-ons such as extended warranty, wax coatings, Scotch-guard, undercoating or door edge guards.
 

·
Registered
2012 Outback Limited, 2.5i
Joined
·
38 Posts
Also, I live in Denver, so any dealer recommendations would be great.

I live in Fort Collins and I just bought a 2012 2.5i Limited. If you are willing to make the drive I HIGHLY suggest you talk to Dallenbach Subaru in Fort Collins. Those guys are awesome they bent over backwards to get my wife and I financing (bad divorces will screw you lol), they were not pushy in anyway, they never badgered us once about the SOA survey only briefly told us about it and said if we couldnt give them 10's then give them what we thought they deserved and give them a call so they could fix the problem and next time get a 10. They are a family owned dealership and many of the family members work there. They offered $800 under invoice right off the bat without me asking. Shoot me a PM and Ill give you some more info.
 

·
Registered
2020 OB Limited XT
Joined
·
336 Posts
A couple of more things

A lot of good ideas have already been mentioned but unless I missed them there are a couple of more ideas that might help.

1. Buy your Subaru where you want to have it serviced. All other factors being equal you will be better off having your Outback serviced at the dealership that sold it to you as they have more of an incentive to make you happy. For example, many car dealers provide free service loaners but only to those people who purchased their new cars at that dealership.

2. Decide to sell your trade-in yourself independent of the new car purchase. Yes, it will cost you a few dollars and maybe a few headaches but in the end you will be better off to the tune of potentially thousands of dollars.

My $0.02. YMMV

Fred Meloan

PS: When I bought my 2011 Outback I had a Land Rover LR2 as a trade-in. The dealer offered me $18,500 and I sold it independently three weeks later for $21,600.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks, some good stuff here. I will definitely be selling my car myself rather than trading it in.

Subarucop, I'll send you a PM in a few. Ft Collins is no problem.
 

·
Registered
2013 2.5i OB LTD
Joined
·
20 Posts
I used USAA Zag pricing, it was awesome. Other banks also offer this "car buying service"

As far as selling it yourself, keep in mind the tax incentives of trading
 

·
Registered
2015 Twilight Blue Legacy Premium
Joined
·
466 Posts
If you are looking at a car that costs $18k and your car is worth $4k, you are only paying taxes on $14k as opposed to the $18k.
 

·
Registered
2013 2.5i Limited
Joined
·
22 Posts
OP.<o:p</o
Learn MSRP/Invoice.<o:p</o
Search the inventory (~2xx OBs), give your specs/options, no need for Costo et-al (you’ll get that walking in), shoot an email to Hueberger Subaru Colorado Springs.<o:p</o
Happy hunting.<o:p</o

How do you find the Invoice price? I told the dealer the invoice price I found on the the net and he told me I was way off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Inventory on the 2013 Ltd. 2.5i with eyesight is very low. Very few color choices. Most dealers have two at the most. When I last checked, their Outback inventory seems to be 1/2 '12s and 1/2 '13s. I'm hoping those '12s sell out fast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for all the input - I'm going to put together an email and send it out to all the local dealers today or tomorrow. Is there a general rule of thumb as to what is a good deal with subaru? Ie $500 over dealer costs, $2500 below MSRP, etc
 

·
Registered
2011 OB 2.5i Prem CVT HK/AWP, Ruby Red Pearl
Joined
·
3,321 Posts
Cross check Invoice from Truecar/Edmunds/etc.<O:p</O:p
No need to confront your dealer with hardcopies… He’ll make an offer > present your counter > deal or walk.<O:p</O:p
General forum target is -2% Invoice, meaning that’s your Bottom Line price (incl. ‘Fluff Fee’) +TTL.<O:p</O:p
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top