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2012 OB , 2017 Impreza
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Discussion Starter #1
I was at dealership yesterday to have fluids changed. (CVT, Front/Rear diff, oil and brake.)

When I asked about the Brake fluid change... the service-writer said they usually just change the fluid in the reservoir. (I know that any bonehead can suck the fluid out of the reservoir and pour in fresh for about $3 ... but this DOES NOT help the ABS nor calipers) Then, I asked "Is this what Subaru means in the owners-manual?" ...they quickly said that would be a "brake system FLUSH".

To make matters worse.... when they attempted to bleed the calipers, one of them was stuck and not able to be opened. (All along, I thought they were bleeding the calipers every time during past visits... If they HAD been, the bleeder-nipple would not have been stuck)

When I asked if my 100K mile extended warantee covers the caliper.... he said NO, a stuck bleeder-nipple is caused by corrosion which is NOT covered by the warantee.

Similarly, the CVT fluid change had two prices. One that is simply a drain/fill.... and one which FLUSHES the entire system. According to the bill, they used a 2nd generation CVT fluid (CVT-II). (different from what my 2012 originally had in it)

I can attest that the fresh CVT fluid really quiets down the transmission. The slight 'whine' which has been there for over 50K miles is now nearly inaudible.
 

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2012 OB , 2017 Impreza
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Discussion Starter #3
I recall that no such thing as a flush on the cvt. Drain fill only.
That is NOT what I was told.

After being given the choice between drain/fill -vs. FLUSH, I opted for full FLUSH whereas they hook up to machine which pumps fluid thru the Xmission-case, Torque-converter, piping, and radiator. Also, I was charged for the full number of quarts of CVT fluid which ALL of this entails. (at over $20 quart) Plus, they indicated that a CVT re-programming was involved after this process.
 

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Bruce it could be a special equipment thing but I’ve done two via our busy dealer that clearly did lots of cvt drain fill jobs given they dont question you or give you the run around and actually said at the 60k check they simply just do the drain fill. I recall this was a discussion before here given like 2/3rds fluid is not drained in the simple drain fill.

I will say there was a noticable reduction in noise ie smoother? Possibly due to the upgraded fluid maybe? It was pretty noticeable though!
 

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'14 Subi OBW, '18 Subi Forester
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When I asked about the Brake fluid change... the service-writer said they usually just change the fluid in the reservoir. (I know that any bonehead can suck the fluid out of the reservoir and pour in fresh for about $3 ... but this DOES NOT help the ABS nor calipers) Then, I asked "Is this what Subaru means in the owners-manual?" ...they quickly said that would be a "brake system FLUSH".

To make matters worse.... when they attempted to bleed the calipers, one of them was stuck and not able to be opened. (All along, I thought they were bleeding the calipers every time during past visits... If they HAD been, the bleeder-nipple would not have been stuck)

When I asked if my 100K mile extended warantee covers the caliper.... he said NO, a stuck bleeder-nipple is caused by corrosion which is NOT covered by the warantee.
A common issue, unfortunately. They only did the turkey baster thing on my reservoir of my '02, as they basically refused to even try and open a 10 year old bleeder.

From that point forward I now apply some penetrating oil to the bleeders on each car every time I rotate tires. I'm still not sure it will really help as even my 2014's calipers, rotors and hardware are pretty rusty going into it's 4th winter.
 

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2001 VDC Wagon - White pearl - 302,000 km
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A common issue, unfortunately. They only did the turkey baster thing on my reservoir of my '02, as they basically refused to even try and open a 10 year old bleeder.

From that point forward I now apply some penetrating oil to the bleeders on each car every time I rotate tires. I'm still not sure it will really help as even my 2014's calipers, rotors and hardware are pretty rusty going into it's 4th winter.
If you can get the bleeder screws loose, I would remove them, coat the entire thread with anti seize compound, then reinstall them. This process will systematically drain a couple ounces of fluid from each caliper. This is a good thing, since your braking system is a blind-ended system. All the heat generated from braking is absorbed by the fluid in the caliper. This process breaks down the fluid so it should be bled out from time to time to introduce new fluid into the caliper.
I've had success removing bleeders by striking the end of the bleeder with a hammer first.
 

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2017 3.6R Limited (Wifes), 2009 3.0R Limited 125k (Mine)
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If you can get the bleeder screws loose, I would remove them, coat the entire thread with anti seize compound, then reinstall them. This process will systematically drain a couple ounces of fluid from each caliper. This is a good thing, since your braking system is a blind-ended system. All the heat generated from braking is absorbed by the fluid in the caliper. This process breaks down the fluid so it should be bled out from time to time to introduce new fluid into the caliper.
I've had success removing bleeders by striking the end of the bleeder with a hammer first.

Careful with the anti-seize on the bleeder nipples. If you do use it make sure it is only applied to the upper threads. The lower threads will allow some of the anti-seize to end up in the fluid. It would be a small amount but abs systems and calipers do not need much to cause issues.

A little PB blaster and if that fails low heat will aid in removing stubborn bleeders.
 

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