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2016 Outback
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Discussion Starter #1
I put a lot of miles on my car - probably the majority highway. I picked up my 2010 OB in December 2009 and I have 79,000 miles. We replaced the rear pads this past summer and my shop says the fronts are still good!?

Am I just an awesome driver or is that what you guys are finding??

Thanks.
 

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I put a lot of miles on my car - probably the majority highway. I picked up my 2010 OB in December 2009 and I have 79,000 miles. We replaced the rear pads this past summer and my shop says the fronts are still good!?

Am I just an awesome driver or is that what you guys are finding??

Thanks.
Subaru's generally speaking run 60-70-100K on the pads pending use and driver etc. Nope your pretty much normal. Sorry
 

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2016 Outback
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Discussion Starter #3
Subaru's generally speaking run 60-70-100K on the pads pending use and driver etc. Nope your pretty much normal. Sorry
LOL I'm just going to assume I'm special :)

This is my first Subie and I had no idea. Very cool :)

I'm used to 60K on a car or SUV being a good amount of miles in a set of pads!
 

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Lord of ScoobyMods, ,
19' Impreza Sport 5 dr / 01' Forester S / 13' OB CVT / 10' Legacy 3.6R / 99 Mita MX-5
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I find it odd that the rears needed to be replaced before the fronts though. Generally speaking, since about 70% of the stopping power is through the front brakes, those wear out first. Maybe the rears were sticking?
 

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Peaty wife had rears wearing first on her VW for many years. I had a hard time sorting that out also. However a mechanic friend explained in cases where the driver does very light brake use over a long distance vs a heavier foot on the brake over a shorter distance in many cases the rear brakes take up a fraction more in the very light braking application and with the right driver and doing the very light brake pressure over a period of time you can see the rears worn out before the fronts.

Wouldn't surprise me if thats the same case here.
 

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Lord of ScoobyMods, ,
19' Impreza Sport 5 dr / 01' Forester S / 13' OB CVT / 10' Legacy 3.6R / 99 Mita MX-5
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1,213 Posts
Interesting concept, could be true. I have to say I fall into the brake a the last minute category myself :)

I still think that the rears were hanging up some though:

TireRack.com - FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

Why are my brakes wearing unevenly?

It’s not uncommon for the front brake pads and rotors to wear out faster than the rears. This is because the front brakes do most of the work stopping the vehicle. As the brakes are applied, the weight distribution of the vehicle shifts foreword on the suspension putting more strain on the front brakes. This is why on most vehicles the front brakes are larger than the rears. It’s also why most front brakes wear out about twice as fast as the rears. This is normal.

Worn out springs, shocks, or struts can allow the vehicle weight distribution to shift faster and more dramatically, overloading the front brakes. This can result in premature front brake wear.

Sticking caliper pistons, caliper slides, or a damaged parking brake can also cause premature brake wear. When this happens, the caliper cannot retract the pad properly when you let off the brakes and it remains in contact with the rotor. In situations like this, it’s typical for the inboard pads next to the caliper piston to wear out very quickly while the outer pad is hardly worn at all. This will generate excessive dust, noise, and heat. It will also wear out the inner surface of the rotor quickly. The tell-tale sign is one wheel with excessive, heavy dusting and noise.

This is not a defect in the pad or the rotor; it’s a failure of the caliper and or the related components such as the piston, slides, or the parking brake assembly.

Keep in mind: the pads don’t move by themselves! The caliper is what forces the pads into the rotor surface and if the caliper sticks, it can’t retract the pads properly which causes excessive pad wear.
 

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OBW H6 VDC, Tribeca, XT6
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positive the front pads were never replaced?

80k front pads still good...so they'll go 100,000 miles...that seems really good to me.

says mostly highway and it's flat up there...
how many miles a day?

i get 40,000 front.
but i live in the mountains and use the brakes.
 

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positive the front pads were never replaced?

80k front pads still good...so they'll go 100,000 miles...that seems really good to me.

says mostly highway and it's flat up there...
how many miles a day?

i get 40,000 front.
but i live in the mountains and use the brakes.
50/50 hills and flat with some towing tossed in so far looking like 60-65K should be attainable for the front pads in my case. Which is more or less identical to our 2001 2.5 GT with similar sized disc in all 4 corners.
 

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2012 2.5 CVT Limited/MR
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I dont know if it applies for the Outback but newer Hondas, use more rear brake (computer controlled) than front to prevent the front end from diving when slamming on the brakes.

EBD- Electronic Brake Distribution
 

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I put a lot of miles on my car - probably the majority highway. I picked up my 2010 OB in December 2009 and I have 79,000 miles. We replaced the rear pads this past summer and my shop says the fronts are still good!?

Am I just an awesome driver or is that what you guys are finding??

Thanks.
I don't have enough miles on my 2012 yet, but I know my 2000 Outback inner front brake pads wore much faster than the outer pads. You might want to make double sure that the inner pads were actually checked and not just the outer pads.
 

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Meh.
I has wagons.
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12,323 Posts
Subaru's generally speaking run 60-70-100K on the pads pending use and driver etc. Nope your pretty much normal. Sorry
I'd love to see that. The constant rush hour traffic kills my front pads. With 3 different drivers over the years, Kaylee has never had a set of front pads make it past 35k before they were shot.
 

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2012 Outback, 3.6R Limited
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Peaty wife had rears wearing first on her VW for many years. I had a hard time sorting that out also. However a mechanic friend explained in cases where the driver does very light brake use over a long distance vs a heavier foot on the brake over a shorter distance in many cases the rear brakes take up a fraction more in the very light braking application and with the right driver and doing the very light brake pressure over a period of time you can see the rears worn out before the fronts.

Wouldn't surprise me if thats the same case here.

This is wrong and doesn't really make sense, the rears wearing faster is a result of the Electronic brakeforce distribution.
 

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2013 Outback 3.6R Limited w/ Sunroof
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Before I sold it, my 2003 Accord V6 used up the rear pads much more frequently than the fronts. That was with mostly highway driving. It also had floating calipers that had a nasty habit of freezing on the guide pins, rendering one side useless and making the other do all the work. I hope the Outbacks don't have that problem as well.
 

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2013 Outback 2.5 Premium 6mt
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Keep in mind that the rear brakes are smaller then the front brakes. So while the front brakes handle 70% of the braking, they probably have 100% or more rotor surface and heat dissipation ability then the rear brakes. If the manufacturer doesn't get the physical brake size ratio calculation perfect so the pads wear perfectly even front to back, you might just end up with a vehicle that wears out the rear brakes sooner then the front just because the rear brakes are too undersized compared to the fronts. Actually, very few manufacturers get it perfect because most vehicles wear out the front brakes first (meaning the fronts are undersized or over biased compared to the rear brakes).

With 4 cylinder Outbacks having large vented front brake rotors and calipers compared to the mediocre sized non-vented rear rotors, I could easily see the rear brakes having to work harder to pull off their 30% share.

It could also be that Subaru purposely made the EBD or proportioning valve so that it applies more rear brake bias during light braking. This would help the rear end track better on less then perfect road conditions.

In summary, I wouldn't worry about the rear set of pads wearing before the front set. Very few vehicles wear their front and rear brakes evenly.
 
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