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My wife's 2017 Outback Limited has just about 40,000 miles on it now and one of the tires wore down to the wear bars. The other 3 tires were still good.
We decided to replace all 4 tires since I believe with all wheel drive, all the tires should be the same.
My wife has the car down at a local tire shop and they tell her that the car needs rear brakes and they should be replaced.
She called me and I told them we would wait on that.
My experience is that the front brakes wear out before the rear and we have never had the front brakes replaced yet.
How could the rear brakes be worn out in only 40K miles?
So now I have to pull all the wheels off to check the brake pad wear, since I am told you can't see the pads with the wheels on.
This gets so frustrating taking the car to shops and they say you need something, that may not be true.
Next weekend, I will pull the wheels and let you know what I find.
 

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2019 Subaru Outback
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The only thing I could think of would be the parking brake on, but I don't even know if that's possible with the Subaru system. You're right it is suspicious.
 

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Yep..... 40k is about right...... forget everything we experienced in previous years with regard to brake wear of earlier braking systems. Subaru’s Adaptive cruise control, eyesight, AWD and primary brake force shifted to the rear will do that .
 

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Electronic Brake Force Distribution... rear brakes can take more load, and are adaptive based on input from vehicle speed sensors and an inertia sensor. There's a blurb in your owner's manual about it.

"The EBD system maximizes the effectiveness of the brakes by allowing the rear brakes to supply a greater proportion of the
braking force. It functions by adjusting the distribution of braking force to the rear wheels in accordance with the vehicle’s
loading condition and speed."​

Good idea to be aware that the rear brakes may not outlast the front.
 

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'15 Outback 2.5i Premium
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My wife's 2017 Outback Limited has just about 40,000 miles on it now and one of the tires wore down to the wear bars. The other 3 tires were still good.
We decided to replace all 4 tires since I believe with all wheel drive, all the tires should be the same.
40,000 miles on the OE tires is pretty good. Based on posts on this forum, some people do better, but more don't do that well.

Why one so much more than the others? If you still have them (it may be too late), see if all four were identical. Someone else here posted a few days ago that three of his original tires were the same but another had a different temperature rating, so that goes to show the possibility that one might have different wear characteristics than the others. That's a long shot, but means that we can never know for sure that they are all labeled the same without checking!

At this point, replacing all of them is most likely the right choice. How much tread was left on the other three?

My wife has the car down at a local tire shop and they tell her that the car needs rear brakes and they should be replaced.
She called me and I told them we would wait on that.
My experience is that the front brakes wear out before the rear and we have never had the front brakes replaced yet.
How could the rear brakes be worn out in only 40K miles?
So now I have to pull all the wheels off to check the brake pad wear, since I am told you can't see the pads with the wheels on.
This gets so frustrating taking the car to shops and they say you need something, that may not be true.
Next weekend, I will pull the wheels and let you know what I find.
As others have already said, the rear brakes typically wear more rapidly than the front brakes on these cars, old assumptions notwithstanding.

"How could the rear brakes be worn out in only 40K miles?"

There is not enough information for us to answer that. Brake life can depend heavily and on your local circumstances and driving style.

If you don't trust any shop, you have little choice but to do the work yourself or lean on a friend to do it for you.
 

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2015 3.6R Limited w/ES
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I got 60k out of my rears (at which time the pads were worn right to the wear indicators), and I drive it pretty hard, but mostly on flat land. If the rotors are clean and smooth, you can easily get away with just a pad replacement, IME.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The other 3 tires had 3 - 4/32 left on them.
At first we were just going to replace two and leave the two best tires on the rear. Since it is AWD, we were told it is best to replace them all.
When I get a chance to check the brakes, I will, next week looks too busy for it now. I will have to start keeping mileages on when they are checked and when to check them next.
I didn't know the computer uses the brakes on all 4 wheels to adapt to driving conditions. I will keep that in mind for reminders to do service on it.
Thanks for the help.
 

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Subaru uses the rear brakes to assist with mitigating excessive nose dive, since they are tiny, they wear really fast. I had to do mine at 40K on my 13 legacy...replaced with lifetime pads so we will see how long they last.
 

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R.I.P. 2009 OB 2.5i 5MT
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The other 3 tires had 3 - 4/32 left on them.
At first we were just going to replace two and leave the two best tires on the rear. Since it is AWD, we were told it is best to replace them all.
When I get a chance to check the brakes, I will, next week looks too busy for it now. I will have to start keeping mileages on when they are checked and when to check them next.
I didn't know the computer uses the brakes on all 4 wheels to adapt to driving conditions. I will keep that in mind for reminders to do service on it.
Thanks for the help.
4/32 is already pretty worn. They won't pass inspection if down to 2/32 which is where you are when you are worn to the wear indicators , but at 4/32, it's common sense to replace.

40K miles is pretty good mileage on an AWD vehicle.
 

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2019 Subaru Outback
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I was rotating my tires today and my rears seem to have plenty of pad left, but I only have 12,400 miles so they should! But looking at them it's hard to believe they would be used up in another 30k.

But I have noticed something else. The rear tires seem to wear slightly faster than the front tires. Is that the experience of other people?

Also, as long as I'm diving OT, I was impressed how quickly the TPMS sensed the correct tire location. I don't think I had gone even a mile. Much nicer than on my Chevy where I need to reprogram them.
 
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