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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just had to replace the brake line assmbly underneath the hood of my outback.(what a pain) There's plenty of air throughout the system now and I'm not sure how t start getting the new brake fluid through the system. I've read the order that I'm supposed to bleed them in but haven't seen anything about the master cylinder. I opened the front passenger bleeder and filled the reservoir but it's not going into the system. Do I need to do something with the master cylinder first? Thanks for any input.
 

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2021 MGM Outback 2.5i Premium with Tungsten Grey seats
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2,293 Posts
Did you bench-bleed the MC before installing it? That would GREATLY reduce the amount of air entering the system after installing it.

What year/trim vehicle? Sometimes there is a need to connect a diagnostic tool to cycle the ABS motors to properly bleed the ABS unit. I don't have info on if this is even needed on any Subaru but having the year/trim info for the vehicle would help others trying to help with that.
 

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2017 OutBack Premier, 2019 Forester Ltd, 2016 370z Rdstr
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Toolindieguy,

Year, model, mileage? Give us this info every time you post.

If there was still fluid in the MC before and after you changed the line, the MC won't need bleeding. Start at the passenger rear wheel. bleed it first, then the driver rear, the passenger front and driver front. Yeah, sometimes the manual has a different order but it still amounts to the same thing. The ABS system is not a concern if you haven't had it apart.

If you don't have a helper to pump the brake pedal, get one. Fill the MC reservoir before and after each wheel bleed. Then have the helper put the brake pedal to the floor and hold it there. You then open the bleed screw and then lock it lightly after any fluid and bubbles come out. Have helper let the pedal up and then repeat until you have no more bubbles from that wheel. Tighten the bleed screw. Then repeat at all of the other wheels and top up the fluid. Test drive and done.
 
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