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2005 Outback XT Ltd. (BLACK/BLACK)
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys. Friday I pick up my new OB XT Ltd. (Black/Black/Auto). First time Subaru owner (89 Toyota LandCruiser before) and I can not wait. Everything I've read sounds amazing.

2 Questions: What do I need to do (or not do) to break her in? How careful and for how long?

Second: Fuel. Must I use 93 Octane? Is that a truth or not?

Thanks for quick replies! Only 36 hours left!!!

Yours,

Rick
[email protected]
 

SubaruOutback.org Founder
2018 Outback Limited 2.5L - 105,000+ miles
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5,122 Posts
Well Rick I had read your email concerning this and I do think its a good idea to post stuff like this on the forums as well, good thinking! :D

Anyway as far as breaking her in, just take it easy for the first thousand miles or so (3000 miles if you want to be extra cautious) and it shoud be fine. Just keep it below 4000 RPM's and try your best to keep it below 80 MPH there hotrod :D Car really doesn't begin truly breaking in until about 10k miles and is usually fully broken in around 20k, although all the time below 10k is crucial as for the longevity of the car. Just treat the car well and it will be fine ;)

As far as fuel, for a turbo car you really need to be using the highest octane gas available. 91 is the minimum, your car can and will run on less than that (no lower than 87 though) but 91 is the minimum recommended octane so that is what you should use. For me at least, here in Omaha the highest it gets is BP Amoco 92 and that is what I've been religiously using since I've purchased the car and have gotten great performance. That being said I like when I can go back home to Illinois (or anywhere east of the Mississippi) and get that good BP or Shell 93 juice, the Hero Wagon loves that stuff! :D
 

Registered
2005 Outback XT Ltd. (BLACK/BLACK)
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, Hero

...as always...a trusty source! I will do my darndest to keep her under 4k and 80 MPH. It's a bit disappointing to here she won't fully break til 20k miles, though. As I had to lease her for business I think I will need to return her at 36k! Anyway. Will do and thanks for the fuel tip. 93 it will be (here in NYC)>

Yours,

Rick.
 

Friendly Subaru Dealer, ,
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Be sure to allow the engine to cool for one minute before turning off the car. The intercooler/turbocharger needs a chance to cool down. Doing this will greatly enhance the life of your car.
 

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2005 Outback XT Ltd. (BLACK/BLACK)
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5 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Re: Letting "Engine Cool"

Luke. Thanks for the response. Do you mean to actually sit and let the engine idle for one minute or so?

Thanks.

Rick
 

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2005 Outback XT Limited
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79 Posts
Luke_Monroe said:
Be sure to allow the engine to cool for one minute before turning off the car. The intercooler/turbocharger needs a chance to cool down. Doing this will greatly enhance the life of your car.
Not true- this is no longer a necessity. This is what turbo timers are for, but you don't need that either. Check the manual.
 

SubaruOutback.org Founder
2018 Outback Limited 2.5L - 105,000+ miles
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Rick I'm sorry I may have mislead you in a way. You don't have to wait until 10k or 20k to go over 4k RPM or 80 MPH. After about 3k miles it will be find to romp on the car all you want ;)
 

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2005 Subaru Outback LLBean
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78 Posts
I'm also breaking-in my 05 Outback LLBean and the manual says to keep it below 4k rpm during the first 1000 miles.
I reached the 80 mph a couple of times but even with that speed my rpm is not even reaching 3k.
It was also mentioned to drive at different speeds.
 

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Turbo "cool down" time.

I was also instructed to wait one minute before shutting the engine off. This concerns me b/c I have a lot of clients that I take to construction sites and appointments and I hate the thought of baby sitting the car for one minute when I have a schedule to keep.

Could someone please expand on this subject and tell me all of you adhere to this reccomendation?
 

OBXT Moderator, ,
2005 Outback XT Limited MT
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I was advised to "vary speeds" as much as possible during the first 1000 miles. Also, I asked specifically about letting the turbo cool down before turning it off and the response from my service manager was, "Technically, it's not necessary, but at the same time it's not a bad idea." That seemed pretty nebulous, so I responded, "If this was your car, what would you do?" He said, "I'd let it cool down."
 

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2005 Subaru Outback LLBean
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78 Posts
And one more thing, the Owner's manual says: Avoid HARD braking.
 

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2008 Subaru Outback
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10 Posts
Hero Boots, I may be mistaken, but I was under the impression that any engine with a compression ration less than 10:1 could, and should run on low octane (87)?

My limited engine knowledge is primarily related to motorcycle engines, but I know that high compression and turbo do not mix. When I looked-up the XT's compression ratio, I found it to be less than 10:1.

I had to switch to 93 octane in my motorcycle because I went to 10.5:1 with a big bore kit.
 

Tokyo's between my toes
2001 Wintergreen Outback 5MT
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6,684 Posts
It used to be true that you'd have to idle a turbo engine because (if you've been running it hard) the turbo can take a long time to quit spinning at high RPM. People would shut down the engine while the turbo was still spinning, and that would cut the oil pressure = roasted turbo bearings.

I don't know if this has been addressed in the newer designs, but go by whatever the manual says.
 

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2005 OB XTL
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Luke_Monroe said:
Be sure to allow the engine to cool for one minute before turning off the car. The intercooler/turbocharger needs a chance to cool down. Doing this will greatly enhance the life of your car.
FYI, I got the following information from SOA :

For current turbo-charged Subaru models, it is not necessary to perform a
'cool down/idling' procedure, as was recommended with past turbo models. Our
current turbo engine has far greater cooling capacity and coupled with
technological advances, makes this practice no longer necessary.

To further explain, the heat contained in the turbo charger will begin to
vaporize the coolant in the turbo charger after the engine is stopped. The
hot vapor will enter the coolant reservoir tank, which is the highest point
of the coolant system. At the same time that the vapor exits that turbo
charger, coolant supplied from the right bank cylinder head flows in to the
charger. This action cools the turbo charger down. This process will
continue until the vaporizing action in the turbo charger has stopped or
cooled down.

I hope this information is helpful to you, but should you have further
questions, please let me know and I'll do my best to assist you further.
Thanks again for your comments and I hope you'll enjoy driving your new
Subaru for many miles to come. Have a Happy Thanksgiving!!
 

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02 OB sport, 2.5, 5MT, WRX seats/catback/rear bar, Hellas, Home Despot CAI and roof rack
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the SOA response makes perfect sense. water cooling on the center bearing section of turbos is the single main reason why "coking" of oil in turbo brgs ain't theproblem it once was.

there's no magic to 1 minute shutdown....what's generally meant is that, water cooled bearing or no, it's better not to shut down the turbo right after it's been working hard. during normal, non-boosted driving, the turbine and impeller blades essentially freewheel and the turbo develops very little heat aside from what's normally present in exh manifold. if you haven't been using the boost in the last couple of minutes before you shut off engine, no real need to worry abt a cooldown period. only if you've been into the boost or driving hard during last couple of minutes of operation will this still be an issue.

IOW, just use common sense. there's nothing other than basic heat transfer physics going on here. you don't even have to park turbo cars facing Mecca or chant arcane incantations while shutting em down any more......:D
 

OBXT Moderator, ,
2005 Outback XT Limited MT
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Cptoversteer,

Yeah, but I get a lot of strange looks as I do my ritual dance as the turbo cools in the Hannafords parking lot. It's worth it as people steer clear of me from then on as I shop...:rolleyes:
 

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Formerly 04 Outback 3.0R VDC, now 2011 Mitsubishi Pajero GLS DiD
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doc5339 said:
Hero Boots, I may be mistaken, but I was under the impression that any engine with a compression ration less than 10:1 could, and should run on low octane (87)?

My limited engine knowledge is primarily related to motorcycle engines, but I know that high compression and turbo do not mix. When I looked-up the XT's compression ratio, I found it to be less than 10:1.

I had to switch to 93 octane in my motorcycle because I went to 10.5:1 with a big bore kit.
doc5339 - the Turbo boots the effective compression ratio, the one listed on the specifications is the non-booted nominal ratio but it can be much higher than that when the turbo is on full boost, say 50% higher and thus the need for higher octane fuel
 

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02 OB sport, 2.5, 5MT, WRX seats/catback/rear bar, Hellas, Home Despot CAI and roof rack
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think in terms of overall cylinder pressure at moment of combustion, whether it's from normally aspirated volume of air at high static comp ratio or from a lower ratio with more mass of air-fuel mixture stuffed into cylinder by a blower. Jondalar is right, effective comp ratio on turbo engines gets astronomical fast.

turbo stuffs in more air-fuel in a % roughly equivalent to the # of bar (atmospheres) it is boosting, reduced slightly due to less than 100% efficiency of turbo....ie, at 1.5 bar (approx 7.5-8 psi of boost, or 22-23 psi absolute), you're compressing 50% more mixture into the same space when the compression stroke happens. if you're running anything over abt 8.5:1 static comp on a turbo engine, your effective comp ratio will get over 12-13:1 well before you hit 10 psi boost. i don't have figures handy, but computed all this out for a turbo conversion a couple of years back.
 

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Break-in Period

I thought this deserved a new thread.

Dealer recommeded taking it easy for the first 2000k due to the break-in period. Does anyone have additional info about that?

What's happening during this period?
What's considered "taking it easy?" (besides the obvious)
what can I expect to change after the break-in period?
 
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